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Honest opinions on weight loss surgery

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  • OddDittyOddDitty Member Posts: 248 Member Member Posts: 248 Member
    Jetrail wrote: »
    Hi , i was looking for some honest opinions on weight loss surgeries such as gastric bypass and sleeves etc. While it's great people are bettering their health do you feel the person who makes hard lifestyle changes and loses the weight on their own works harder ? Is it wrong to feel that way? . I guess to me when you decide to change your lifestyle and really grind for what you want health wise it seems slot harder vs losing weight with surgical help, maybe I'm wrong but I'd like some opinions, like I said it's still grwat when anyone betters their lifestyle

    Maybe it depends on why you're doing it? I have a friend who had to get it because she had to lose the weight quickly to save her life. It worked and she's doing wonderfully.

    And then there's those for whom weight loss is a major issue (see MY 600 POUND LIFE) where there's also a time factor in saving the life or in controlling diabetes.

    But if a person can demonstratively lose the weight, why put yourself through that pain? I knew a woman years ago who needed to lose 100 pounds. And she had no threatening conditions. She just wanted to get thinner faster.

    She ended up with a bunch of sagging skin (which can happen and has happened to me without surgery, but not as badly).

    She then went back to her old ways and regained 50. I felt very bad for her!

    This is just my opinion based on what I've seen. It really seems to be a matter of why you want it as to whether or not you should get it.
  • twatson4936twatson4936 Member Posts: 121 Member Member Posts: 121 Member
    If you make no lifestyle changes then this will just be a temporary fix, I've seen people do this and lose a ton of weight only to gain most of it back many years later. I have also seen it cause health issues, like bowel obstruction.
  • lcoulter23lcoulter23 Member Posts: 565 Member Member Posts: 565 Member
    I'm 10 weeks post op, 11 weeks tomorrow. I had to do a year of medically supervised weight loss before insurance would cover it. I had gastric bypass. I lost almost 50 pounds preop. Most was while on a mostly liquid diet because my stomach didn't digest food correctly. I'm now down to 254 from 340. I'm still on mostly liquids because my tiny stomach doesn't tolerate much and my taste buds have changed drastically, but if I hadn't made the changes pre-op, in preparation for surgery, I'm not sure I would ve doing as well as I am. I did have to have a second procedure because of complications, but it was all worth it just because my digestion problem seems to be fixed. I'm also off of a handful of meds I was on before surgery. Surgery is only a tool. If you aren't willing to put in the hard work, it will not be a success. I watch what I eat and stay on plan every day. This was my last resort, and it was worth it to me just to be able to eat a tiny bit of real food again. My stomach is the size of 3 baby fingers put together in a fist. My max consumption is about an ounce at a time. I'm still learning my full signal. Also, I have to force myself to eat because I'm never hungry. My foos I can eat right now are cheese, yogurt, and sometimes chicken thigh or hamburger meat and mashed potatoes.
  • WillingtoLose1001984WillingtoLose1001984 Member Posts: 241 Member Member Posts: 241 Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I had the gastric bypass and the results have been life-changing. I most appreciate getting my mobility back, though getting off all my medications was a big plus.

    I had the gastric sleeve and it has changed my life. I am now in onederland from highest weight of 330. I had such a hard time losing weight before because I was a volume eater and severely depressed. I've had to deal with the depression and exercise but it is so much easier to lose weight. I know I will have to keep up the discipline because I get hungry when I don't exercise. It is still a lifestyle change and mindset change. I try to eat healthy and I take my vitamins every day. I have a more physical job which helps burn calories too. I try to burn as much as I can most every day. I hate being fat. I've been that way my entire life and I want to be thin now. The wls gave me so much hope that I can get there and not struggle so much with food every day.
  • NicoleL874NicoleL874 Member, Premium Posts: 681 Member Member, Premium Posts: 681 Member
    What would be more expensive, weight loss surgery, or hiring a trainer and dietitian to help you make lifestyle changes? I've been thinking that this would probably be a better option than surgery--unless you were too heavy to move.

    Before my surgery, I had nutritionists, dieticians, personal trainers, memberships to a variety of gyms. I was incredibly motivated and honestly tried. My body would not let go of the weight.

    I ended up moving to a new area, had a hard time finding a PCP that I liked. I finally did. The second time I met her, she asked me about surgery, I flat out refused. The third time I met her, she gave me a brochure for the surgery department. I threw it out. I was trying. I could do it on my own. I had the tools, I knew how. But, my body wouldn't let go of the weight. The fourth time I met her, she told me I had to go to an information session if I wanted to see her again. I did.

    She saved my life. I went. I listened to a very magnanimous man speak about the surgery and how it could save me. I left there, researched three other local programs. That man became my surgeon.

    It had nothing to do with money. I'd be willing to bet I spent almost $10k on gym memberships and training before surgery. I had multiple food sensitivity tests, I had auto-immune tests, all paid for out of pocket to try and figure out why I wouldn't lose weight.

    After surgery, I continue to pay my gym membership. I paid for one year, twice a week personal training. The second year, I paid for once a week training. The third year, I continued once a week for about six months. I know continue at the gym, but know how to work out and don't feel I need the trainer anymore, but will absolutely pay again if I feel like I do.

    This is absolutely not about money. Never has been. It was about saving my life before my weight got to the point that it killed me, or one of my comorbidities did.
  • NicoleL874NicoleL874 Member, Premium Posts: 681 Member Member, Premium Posts: 681 Member
    Happy you found something that worked for you, and had a good result!

    Out of curiosity, do you know how many calories you consume daily after surgery, versus before surgery? Do you have any insight into what was causing non-surgical methods to fail for you?


    I would have to go back eons and look, but my bariatric surgeon says that with years of yo-yo dieting, we can seriously mess up our metabolism. I had followed weight watchers to a T, LA Weightloss, Jenny Craig, Nutrisystem, you name it, I tried it. I was on strict 1000 calorie diets up to 1800 calories. My body just got to the point where it wouldn't release anything. Even on his 2-week pre-surgery diet most people lose 10 - 30lbs. I dropped 3.

    Even my first three months post-op were much slower than most other people. My body just hit a point where it decided to let everything go and I ended up exceeding all of his expectations. *shrug* No clue. My body just finally gave in.

    Right after surgery, the first 8 weeks you are really consuming nothing. (On my plan, surgeons all have different plans) The first week was only clear liquids, two weeks full liquids, two weeks pureed foods, two weeks soft foods...this is the stage you can finally add significant calories, but it's still a few hundred calories a day.

    I still eat about 1000 calories a day. If I workout, I add in more. It's not easy, even now. But, it has been worth it. I am active, healthy, happy, way more emotionally stable than I was before. I can't think of one negative for me...
  • cinger0439cinger0439 Member, Premium Posts: 5 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5 Member
    Why are we spending time judging each other via a procedure? Doesn't the world do that enough? I suggest each person do the research, understand what works best for themselves, and does what they need to do. Sharing stories on personal journey's and supporting each other seems more productive and human to me.
  • Diatonic12Diatonic12 Member Posts: 12,488 Member Member Posts: 12,488 Member
    I had to look back through here but @janejellyroll is correct. You've been here quite awhile, so you know the drill. You might want to start your own group or join another for support.
  • missysippy930missysippy930 Member Posts: 2,284 Member Member Posts: 2,284 Member
    cinger0439 wrote: »
    Why are we spending time judging each other via a procedure? Doesn't the world do that enough? I suggest each person do the research, understand what works best for themselves, and does what they need to do. Sharing stories on personal journey's and supporting each other seems more productive and human to me.

    I think there are multiple threads on WLS in the "Motivation and Support" area. Those are going to be geared towards what you're looking for. This is the "Debate" section, where we tend to get more into our personal opinions and assessment of the overall pros and cons of things.

    Besides, @cinger0439 this is a two year old thread. 🤷🏻‍♀️
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 24,328 Member Member Posts: 24,328 Member
    cinger0439 wrote: »
    Why are we spending time judging each other via a procedure? Doesn't the world do that enough? I suggest each person do the research, understand what works best for themselves, and does what they need to do. Sharing stories on personal journey's and supporting each other seems more productive and human to me.

    I think there are multiple threads on WLS in the "Motivation and Support" area. Those are going to be geared towards what you're looking for. This is the "Debate" section, where we tend to get more into our personal opinions and assessment of the overall pros and cons of things.

    Besides, @cinger0439 this is a two year old thread. 🤷🏻‍♀️

    Haha, oops! Completely missed that!
  • aimeekate19aimeekate19 Member Posts: 2 Member Member Posts: 2 Member
    I see this a lot on Instagram. It's the "I lost weight naturally" statement that drives me up the wall. Weight loss surgery is just a tool. That's it. Almost all of the people I personally know that have had it (some the sleeve and a few the gastric bypass - RouxNY) grind it out in the gym on the regular and watch what they eat. The one or two that don't do this have gained back quite a bit of the weight. One is almost at the same weight she was when she got the surgery. By 4 years out, the sleeved patient's stomach has gotten big enough that if they make bad choices when eating, they will gain weight just as easily as someone who has not had the surgery. Sure, they lose weight rapidly in the beginning - they're only allowed to eat first liquids and then soft foods. Their stomach is still healing and swollen for quite a while after surgery. After that initial period, more effort has to be expended.

    Sure, you could easily see this as a waste of money but for the vast amount of people that get this done, it does save their life and create new and healthier habits.

    If you only remember one thing from my post, it's this - everyone has to work at losing weight, whether they have had the surgery or not. It's just the tools they use to do it don't look the same.
  • B_Plus_EffortB_Plus_Effort Member Posts: 265 Member Member Posts: 265 Member
    the people I know who have gotten the surgeries have gained most of the weight back
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 24,328 Member Member Posts: 24,328 Member
    muszyngr wrote: »
    the people I know who have gotten the surgeries have gained most of the weight back

    The sad truth about weight loss is that the vast majority of people who lose weight wind up gaining it back. I think your anecdotes suggest more about the nature of *weight loss in general* than they do about weight loss surgery specifically.
  • IronIsMyTherapyIronIsMyTherapy Member Posts: 463 Member Member Posts: 463 Member
    I don't view surgery as "easy". If someone makes any change with the goal of becoming healthier, I can't see anyone having a problem with it. And if they do, it's really none of their business.
  • VeryKatieVeryKatie Member Posts: 5,790 Member Member Posts: 5,790 Member
    I'm under the impression someone who gets surgery has to be even more diligent, plus survive and recover from a surgery.
    edited October 30
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