Carnivore Diet: The Antithesis to Veganism

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  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    "Science is determined by consensus of research."

    Jesus wept.

    If you disagree with that then clearly you have never heard of the concept of a meta-analysis or confidence intervals.

    Unfortunately, if the recommendations of every major medical institute in the world doesn't align to their personal believe or weight loss journey, than they are incline to disagree with decades of research. And arguing against personal biased makes it even more difficult to have a coherent argument because the sides will never agree.

    Furthermore, I find it interesting that the battle is always low fat vs low carb when there is a huge middle ground. What we do know from the research is regardless of lifestyle/diet, weight loss and exercise have the greatest impact on metabolic health. If the diet you are following doesn't drive that, than there will be little change. Layne Norton, PhD put it a good way during an interview with Dom D'agistino, PhD on Joe Rogan's show. It essentially was, "people spend so much time chasing the 5% benefit when the 95% benefit comes from weight loss and exercise".

    And before the argument can be made, yes, there is significant research regarding the benefits of blood glucose/insulin control with those with diabetes, PCOS or insulin resistance. But that is specific to that population. And that population should absolution have a more controlled approach to carbs. But that other 90% of people, just need to find what foods and macro combo helps adherence/compliance be the greatest.

    I agree. I would have liked to have kept this as animal based vs plant based since there are LCHF and LFHC vegans and vegetarians out there. Those who are animal based will have lower carbs, of course.

    But it's more like the other 50% of the population may need to ( or should) watch macros for health reasons. ;) I get your gist though. Not everyone needs to watch their macros. :)
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,502 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Steakhouse, IME, is easy for low carb or keto.

    I would not think that there was any point to going to a restaurant if one were carnivore. How many steakhouses are organized is that you choose your meat and then the table gets various sides. Bread may well be on the table (as in most restaurants, I generally don't eat it either). I

    So the issue for a carnivore would be that they can't eat the sides. If not being able to eat the whole meal bothers you (I frequently go to restaurants before the theater or symphony so can't take leftovers and half of it gets wasted sometimes. Bummer but hardly unique to carnivores, and if it were a personal side you could ask them not to add it to the plate, even though it would not lower the cost.)

    I wouldn't be surprised if you get comments (from others chomping away at the meat) like "are you sure you don't want these delicious brussels with bacon" or whatever the side is -- creamed spinach, asparagus. That's hardly "vegans being superior," it's people being people.

    Same with those Brazilian places -- lots of meat to fill up on, but you'd have to ignore all the sides.

    If the point of carnivore (which I think it really is in many cases) to have a boring but satisfying enough diet where you won't really ever want to overeat, tempting yourself with a bunch of sides you like might make it harder, which is why I'd think restaurants would be disfavored. Also, assuming you know how to cook meat and get good quality meat, most of the benefit and interest of a restaurant would be gone, as anything interesting they do in preparing a meal or combining flavors would be something you don't want, as most cuisines do include a wide variety of ingredients. Most I go to certainly do have many dishes featuring vegetables, which is why I think people who slam restaurants as unhealthy don't pay attention to the choices or have a narrow view of the restaurants that are out there. (But in any case the restaurants are going to be higher cal than a typical meal, even if they come with lots of veg.)

    Wrong on all accounts. Steakhouse meals are structured so that a steak meal comes with sides and one cannot buy the steak a la carte. I am not talking about appetizers for the whole table, which are a separate item to purchase.

    The responses I get are most often from omnivores, but that is the most populous group. It often goes something like this:
    Omnivore co-worker, fellow member of various groups, etc: "Would you like a donut, grapes, etc.?
    Me: "No thanks, I don't eat plants."
    Omnivore: "You don't eat plants?! That is really unhealthy. You need plants to live."
    And so on... yes, this conversation happens even in Iowa. You can call me a liar if it helps you feel better, but I have had this conversation almost in those exact words many more times than I can remember each conversation individually...

    I'm confused because on the last page you mentioned 'the "moral superiority" vibe from vegans' but your example here is of omnivores, with no undertones of moral superiority whatsoever. They are simply sharing their utterly unsurprising belief that a healthy diet includes plants.

    I'm sorry you are confused. Yes, the example given is from an omnivore. Omnivores are more often arguing against this diet for supposed health reasons, not for moral/ethical reasons. Yes, vegans give off the "moral superiority" vibe. Both are true. I get different responses from different people depending on whether they eat vegan, vegetarian (except all sub-sets of vegetarians give similar responses as each other), or omnivore - I thought I explained that previously, but must not have been clear enough.
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Steakhouse, IME, is easy for low carb or keto.

    I would not think that there was any point to going to a restaurant if one were carnivore. How many steakhouses are organized is that you choose your meat and then the table gets various sides. Bread may well be on the table (as in most restaurants, I generally don't eat it either). I

    So the issue for a carnivore would be that they can't eat the sides. If not being able to eat the whole meal bothers you (I frequently go to restaurants before the theater or symphony so can't take leftovers and half of it gets wasted sometimes. Bummer but hardly unique to carnivores, and if it were a personal side you could ask them not to add it to the plate, even though it would not lower the cost.)

    I wouldn't be surprised if you get comments (from others chomping away at the meat) like "are you sure you don't want these delicious brussels with bacon" or whatever the side is -- creamed spinach, asparagus. That's hardly "vegans being superior," it's people being people.

    Same with those Brazilian places -- lots of meat to fill up on, but you'd have to ignore all the sides.

    If the point of carnivore (which I think it really is in many cases) to have a boring but satisfying enough diet where you won't really ever want to overeat, tempting yourself with a bunch of sides you like might make it harder, which is why I'd think restaurants would be disfavored. Also, assuming you know how to cook meat and get good quality meat, most of the benefit and interest of a restaurant would be gone, as anything interesting they do in preparing a meal or combining flavors would be something you don't want, as most cuisines do include a wide variety of ingredients. Most I go to certainly do have many dishes featuring vegetables, which is why I think people who slam restaurants as unhealthy don't pay attention to the choices or have a narrow view of the restaurants that are out there. (But in any case the restaurants are going to be higher cal than a typical meal, even if they come with lots of veg.)

    Wrong on all accounts. Steakhouse meals are structured so that a steak meal comes with sides and one cannot buy the steak a la carte. I am not talking about appetizers for the whole table, which are a separate item to purchase.

    The responses I get are most often from omnivores, but that is the most populous group. It often goes something like this:
    Omnivore co-worker, fellow member of various groups, etc: "Would you like a donut, grapes, etc.?
    Me: "No thanks, I don't eat plants."
    Omnivore: "You don't eat plants?! That is really unhealthy. You need plants to live."
    And so on... yes, this conversation happens even in Iowa. You can call me a liar if it helps you feel better, but I have had this conversation almost in those exact words many more times than I can remember each conversation individually.

    I typically avoid restaurants except in the circumstances described. Sometimes cooking at home is not an option. Example - last week, I had a meeting with a political group at a small local restaurant. I paid quite a bit for a piece of beef brisket as I asked for the sandwich plain, no bun, and no sides... no discount for that either, and I ate more when I came home afterwards. The next day, I had a work lunch at a local restaurant (work paid, so my issue was more about food quantity). Grilled chicken breasts, no fries or bread. I had a tuna pouch I keep stashed at my desk in the afternoon, which helped a bit. The next day, work catered lunch for everyone and had its annual drawing. 2 years ago, I happened to get drawn for the big prize - a TV. I had gone home (I live about 5 min. drive from work). Until my name was drawn, nobody noticed I had skipped. But one need not be present to win. So when my manager was giving me a hard time about skipping, I pointed out that the menu didn't work for me. I didn't make a fuss or ask them to change anything for me, but that is just the facts. This year, I skipped and nobody said anything (they probably didn't notice), nor did I say anything.

    Last week was 3 days where I wasn't traveling, but had potential restaurant challenges. Of those 3 days, I made do with restaurants on 2 that were not as easy to skip. When traveling by car, I can carry some amounts of meat that doesn't require cooking and eat McDonald's beef patties mostly otherwise. When traveling for work, I care less about the cost side, but end up buying snacks to supplement the relatively smaller food amount. The exception is when I travel to our corp. office that is in an area with a lot of vegetarians and vegans. I normally don't have time to go anywhere for lunch and the on-site cafeteria caters to the common interest. In that case, I stop at a Wal-Mart between the airport and the hotel/destination town to get meat snacks that don't require refrigeration and I just eat that for lunches.

    I don't eat carnivore to be bland nor to limit intake, though both end up being true whether intended or not. I eat it for better BG management and because I feel so much better (less GI distress, more alert).

    TBH, I will often use my celiac disease as an excuse to avoid eating out. It simplifies things so much. I'll have a coffee or whiskey if there is company that I want to visit with, and that's it. People mostly get that but I still get eye rolls from those who believe a little bit won't hurt.

    I'm another who eats animal based for health issues although I include a bit of plant here and there with greater ease because I don't have the same concerns that T1D puts upon you. That also makes it so that I can eat a bit off plan once in a while - like taking a small serving of a GF meat lasagne which a relative made special for me; I skipped the salad and added meat and cheese appetizers to my plate too. I brought crustless sugar free cheesecake with whipped cream for dessert so no problem there. ;)
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    edited December 2018
    I think it is a bit easier to eat vegetarian than as carnivore.

    When I ate at a family members house the other day, it was a meat lasagne and salad. No other options. If eating 100% carnivore, one is out of luck. Your options then are to say why you are not eating the food, or lie.

    When I ate at a friend's house last week it was potatoes, veggies, wine and ribs in bbq sauce, and dessert. Nothing there is carnivore either unless you wash off the ribs. Lol. Last time I went out to eat at a restaurant, I just had prawns and butter (I am GF too).

    I'm avoiding a work dinner tonight (meatballs in sauce with rice and a salad) because it is not GF or animal. I'll arrive after dinner for drinks or coffee.... Although neither are really carnivore either.

    If one is a vegetarian, you could still have the sides and salad, plus any dessert.

    Eating breakfast out is often the easiest - bacon and eggs.

    I imagine that eating vegan could be just as difficult knowing how many dishes have butter or eggs.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,899 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Steakhouse, IME, is easy for low carb or keto.

    I would not think that there was any point to going to a restaurant if one were carnivore. How many steakhouses are organized is that you choose your meat and then the table gets various sides. Bread may well be on the table (as in most restaurants, I generally don't eat it either). I

    So the issue for a carnivore would be that they can't eat the sides. If not being able to eat the whole meal bothers you (I frequently go to restaurants before the theater or symphony so can't take leftovers and half of it gets wasted sometimes. Bummer but hardly unique to carnivores, and if it were a personal side you could ask them not to add it to the plate, even though it would not lower the cost.)

    I wouldn't be surprised if you get comments (from others chomping away at the meat) like "are you sure you don't want these delicious brussels with bacon" or whatever the side is -- creamed spinach, asparagus. That's hardly "vegans being superior," it's people being people.

    Same with those Brazilian places -- lots of meat to fill up on, but you'd have to ignore all the sides.

    If the point of carnivore (which I think it really is in many cases) to have a boring but satisfying enough diet where you won't really ever want to overeat, tempting yourself with a bunch of sides you like might make it harder, which is why I'd think restaurants would be disfavored. Also, assuming you know how to cook meat and get good quality meat, most of the benefit and interest of a restaurant would be gone, as anything interesting they do in preparing a meal or combining flavors would be something you don't want, as most cuisines do include a wide variety of ingredients. Most I go to certainly do have many dishes featuring vegetables, which is why I think people who slam restaurants as unhealthy don't pay attention to the choices or have a narrow view of the restaurants that are out there. (But in any case the restaurants are going to be higher cal than a typical meal, even if they come with lots of veg.)

    Wrong on all accounts. Steakhouse meals are structured so that a steak meal comes with sides and one cannot buy the steak a la carte. I am not talking about appetizers for the whole table, which are a separate item to purchase.

    The responses I get are most often from omnivores, but that is the most populous group. It often goes something like this:
    Omnivore co-worker, fellow member of various groups, etc: "Would you like a donut, grapes, etc.?
    Me: "No thanks, I don't eat plants."
    Omnivore: "You don't eat plants?! That is really unhealthy. You need plants to live."
    And so on... yes, this conversation happens even in Iowa. You can call me a liar if it helps you feel better, but I have had this conversation almost in those exact words many more times than I can remember each conversation individually.

    I typically avoid restaurants except in the circumstances described. Sometimes cooking at home is not an option. Example - last week, I had a meeting with a political group at a small local restaurant. I paid quite a bit for a piece of beef brisket as I asked for the sandwich plain, no bun, and no sides... no discount for that either, and I ate more when I came home afterwards. The next day, I had a work lunch at a local restaurant (work paid, so my issue was more about food quantity). Grilled chicken breasts, no fries or bread. I had a tuna pouch I keep stashed at my desk in the afternoon, which helped a bit. The next day, work catered lunch for everyone and had its annual drawing. 2 years ago, I happened to get drawn for the big prize - a TV. I had gone home (I live about 5 min. drive from work). Until my name was drawn, nobody noticed I had skipped. But one need not be present to win. So when my manager was giving me a hard time about skipping, I pointed out that the menu didn't work for me. I didn't make a fuss or ask them to change anything for me, but that is just the facts. This year, I skipped and nobody said anything (they probably didn't notice), nor did I say anything.

    Last week was 3 days where I wasn't traveling, but had potential restaurant challenges. Of those 3 days, I made do with restaurants on 2 that were not as easy to skip. When traveling by car, I can carry some amounts of meat that doesn't require cooking and eat McDonald's beef patties mostly otherwise. When traveling for work, I care less about the cost side, but end up buying snacks to supplement the relatively smaller food amount. The exception is when I travel to our corp. office that is in an area with a lot of vegetarians and vegans. I normally don't have time to go anywhere for lunch and the on-site cafeteria caters to the common interest. In that case, I stop at a Wal-Mart between the airport and the hotel/destination town to get meat snacks that don't require refrigeration and I just eat that for lunches.

    I don't eat carnivore to be bland nor to limit intake, though both end up being true whether intended or not. I eat it for better BG management and because I feel so much better (less GI distress, more alert).

    You're following a niche diet. I had the exact same issues when I was vegan, plus a lot of ribbing and some family bullying on top of it. Don't go out of your way to tell people you're carnivore and they won't say anything (no thank you is fine the explanation is inviting commentary). Also most of the cost of a meal is the meat, you would not be getting a big discount because you didn't eat extremely cheap ingredients like bread and potatoes. It sucks but nothing you're describing is particularly bad or out of the ordinary for anyone who is veg or has a major allergy, nor is it a sign that carnivores are being judged and ostracized en mass.

    ^This. When I'm offered meat, I simply say "no thank you", I don't add that I'm a vegetarian, because that's the remark that invites a discussion.

    Announcing that one doesn't eat plants is opening oneself up for comments. Just quietly going about eating meat and tactfully saying "no thank you" doesn't.

    I did paleo for a while, and even after that I'd usually not want to waste calories on bread or rice, since I just don't care about it enough to justify the calories. We have an every other Friday work lunch, and I'd go and if there were sandwiches or rice I'd remove the bread/ignore the rice and eat more of the other options (meat/veg) so as to make up for it. Very few people even noticed I was doing this, because I didn't make a big thing of it.

    I have found that sometimes people will start talking about what they don't eat, but usually because they want to discuss it, many do like talking about their food issues and special diets.
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,502 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Steakhouse, IME, is easy for low carb or keto.

    I would not think that there was any point to going to a restaurant if one were carnivore. How many steakhouses are organized is that you choose your meat and then the table gets various sides. Bread may well be on the table (as in most restaurants, I generally don't eat it either). I

    So the issue for a carnivore would be that they can't eat the sides. If not being able to eat the whole meal bothers you (I frequently go to restaurants before the theater or symphony so can't take leftovers and half of it gets wasted sometimes. Bummer but hardly unique to carnivores, and if it were a personal side you could ask them not to add it to the plate, even though it would not lower the cost.)

    I wouldn't be surprised if you get comments (from others chomping away at the meat) like "are you sure you don't want these delicious brussels with bacon" or whatever the side is -- creamed spinach, asparagus. That's hardly "vegans being superior," it's people being people.

    Same with those Brazilian places -- lots of meat to fill up on, but you'd have to ignore all the sides.

    If the point of carnivore (which I think it really is in many cases) to have a boring but satisfying enough diet where you won't really ever want to overeat, tempting yourself with a bunch of sides you like might make it harder, which is why I'd think restaurants would be disfavored. Also, assuming you know how to cook meat and get good quality meat, most of the benefit and interest of a restaurant would be gone, as anything interesting they do in preparing a meal or combining flavors would be something you don't want, as most cuisines do include a wide variety of ingredients. Most I go to certainly do have many dishes featuring vegetables, which is why I think people who slam restaurants as unhealthy don't pay attention to the choices or have a narrow view of the restaurants that are out there. (But in any case the restaurants are going to be higher cal than a typical meal, even if they come with lots of veg.)

    Wrong on all accounts. Steakhouse meals are structured so that a steak meal comes with sides and one cannot buy the steak a la carte. I am not talking about appetizers for the whole table, which are a separate item to purchase.

    The responses I get are most often from omnivores, but that is the most populous group. It often goes something like this:
    Omnivore co-worker, fellow member of various groups, etc: "Would you like a donut, grapes, etc.?
    Me: "No thanks, I don't eat plants."
    Omnivore: "You don't eat plants?! That is really unhealthy. You need plants to live."
    And so on... yes, this conversation happens even in Iowa. You can call me a liar if it helps you feel better, but I have had this conversation almost in those exact words many more times than I can remember each conversation individually.

    I typically avoid restaurants except in the circumstances described. Sometimes cooking at home is not an option. Example - last week, I had a meeting with a political group at a small local restaurant. I paid quite a bit for a piece of beef brisket as I asked for the sandwich plain, no bun, and no sides... no discount for that either, and I ate more when I came home afterwards. The next day, I had a work lunch at a local restaurant (work paid, so my issue was more about food quantity). Grilled chicken breasts, no fries or bread. I had a tuna pouch I keep stashed at my desk in the afternoon, which helped a bit. The next day, work catered lunch for everyone and had its annual drawing. 2 years ago, I happened to get drawn for the big prize - a TV. I had gone home (I live about 5 min. drive from work). Until my name was drawn, nobody noticed I had skipped. But one need not be present to win. So when my manager was giving me a hard time about skipping, I pointed out that the menu didn't work for me. I didn't make a fuss or ask them to change anything for me, but that is just the facts. This year, I skipped and nobody said anything (they probably didn't notice), nor did I say anything.

    Last week was 3 days where I wasn't traveling, but had potential restaurant challenges. Of those 3 days, I made do with restaurants on 2 that were not as easy to skip. When traveling by car, I can carry some amounts of meat that doesn't require cooking and eat McDonald's beef patties mostly otherwise. When traveling for work, I care less about the cost side, but end up buying snacks to supplement the relatively smaller food amount. The exception is when I travel to our corp. office that is in an area with a lot of vegetarians and vegans. I normally don't have time to go anywhere for lunch and the on-site cafeteria caters to the common interest. In that case, I stop at a Wal-Mart between the airport and the hotel/destination town to get meat snacks that don't require refrigeration and I just eat that for lunches.

    I don't eat carnivore to be bland nor to limit intake, though both end up being true whether intended or not. I eat it for better BG management and because I feel so much better (less GI distress, more alert).

    You're following a niche diet. I had the exact same issues when I was vegan, plus a lot of ribbing and some family bullying on top of it. Don't go out of your way to tell people you're carnivore and they won't say anything (no thank you is fine the explanation is inviting commentary). Also most of the cost of a meal is the meat, you would not be getting a big discount because you didn't eat extremely cheap ingredients like bread and potatoes. It sucks but nothing you're describing is particularly bad or out of the ordinary for anyone who is veg or has a major allergy, nor is it a sign that carnivores are being judged and ostracized en mass.

    ^This. When I'm offered meat, I simply say "no thank you", I don't add that I'm a vegetarian, because that's the remark that invites a discussion.

    Announcing that one doesn't eat plants is opening oneself up for comments. Just quietly going about eating meat and tactfully saying "no thank you" doesn't.

    That's true in some situations, but when we are talking about co-workers where there is food brought in fairly regularly, there is a benefit to explaining. By answering the way I do, people have finally learned to stop coming around and offering such foods to me. It took a long time for people to believe me (not sure why), but I finally don't have people stopping by with cookies, donuts, fruit, or whatever other plant products they happened to bring in that day.
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    I think it is a bit easier to eat vegetarian than as carnivore.

    When I ate at a family members house the other day, it was a meat lasagne and salad. No other options. If eating 100% carnivore, one is out of luck. Your options then are to say why you are not eating the food, or lie.

    When I ate at a friend's house last week it was potatoes, veggies, wine and ribs in bbq sauce, and dessert. Nothing there is carnivore either unless you wash off the ribs. Lol. Last time I went out to eat at a restaurant, I just had prawns and butter (I am GF too).

    I'm avoiding a work dinner tonight (meatballs in sauce with rice and a salad) because it is not GF or animal. I'll arrive after dinner for drinks or coffee.... Although neither are really carnivore either.

    If one is a vegetarian, you could still have the sides and salad, plus any dessert.

    Eating breakfast out is often the easiest - bacon and eggs.

    I imagine that eating vegan could be just as difficult knowing how many dishes have butter or eggs.

    Eating as a GF vegetarian isn't easy. Not easy at all. Cross contamination in other people's homes even on supposedly safe vegetable sides has gotten me one time too many. I don't really trust anything.
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    I think it is a bit easier to eat vegetarian than as carnivore.

    When I ate at a family members house the other day, it was a meat lasagne and salad. No other options. If eating 100% carnivore, one is out of luck. Your options then are to say why you are not eating the food, or lie.

    When I ate at a friend's house last week it was potatoes, veggies, wine and ribs in bbq sauce, and dessert. Nothing there is carnivore either unless you wash off the ribs. Lol. Last time I went out to eat at a restaurant, I just had prawns and butter (I am GF too).

    I'm avoiding a work dinner tonight (meatballs in sauce with rice and a salad) because it is not GF or animal. I'll arrive after dinner for drinks or coffee.... Although neither are really carnivore either.

    If one is a vegetarian, you could still have the sides and salad, plus any dessert.

    Eating breakfast out is often the easiest - bacon and eggs.

    I imagine that eating vegan could be just as difficult knowing how many dishes have butter or eggs.

    Eating as a GF vegetarian isn't easy. Not easy at all. Cross contamination in other people's homes even on supposedly safe vegetable sides has gotten me one time too many. I don't really trust anything.

    I understand and empathize. I am in a similar boat.
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    edited December 2018
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    The beginning of this thread was months before hunting season. We did not have venison our geese in the freezer at that time. Those animals are small and won't last a year.

    I realize non hunters would not know that.

    You're painting an incomplete picture of the source of your food when trying to make a counterpoint to the people who give you flak about the environmental impact of it. That incomplete portrait is disingenuous on your part and suits your narrative at the time.

    We had no game in the freezer in July. He struck out hunting last year. I should have mentioned that?

    I also eat dairy, lamb, fish, shellfish, crustaceans, pig, chicken, turkey, and various types of eggs. I mostly eat beef.
    Victim? How? By noticing judgement? How would that make anyone a victim? I have no idea where you got that from. :confused:

    By inferring judgement. You eat a diet that's outside the mainstream, and outside the mainstream of nutritional guidance. People are going to comment on it because it's different. Commenting != judgement.

    I still don't see how noticing judgement makes me a victim.
    What? I feel outside the mainstream and that "undertone" comes across in my posts? I am outside the mainstream. LOL The undertone probably only shows up in response to some peoples' posts....

    I don't understand where you're coming from, truly. If you are happy with your diet, and secure in your choices, there's no need for undertone at all. There's no need to paint incomplete pictures. There's no need to try for silly reaches like trying to make the point that growing plant crops is bad environmentally to counter the argument that cattle farming is bad for the environment. There's no need to try to "prove" universal benefits to how you eat. There's no need to validate anything beyond your own n=1.

    I am disingenuous because I did not mention the lack of venison in my freezer? And that relates to someone saying that plant growing is bad for the environment? :confused:

    As mentioned, the undertone is probably in response to some members and their posts.
    I don't own it? I'm too wishy washy on my stance? I let others sway me from my beliefs too much?

    :D

    I said *my* stance as a vegetarian was wishy washy considering the stances of other vegetarians. Wasn't implying anything about you. I was trying to demonstrate that it's okay to sit comfortably in n=1 just because it works for you for whatever reason you're happy with.

    I know you said that. I should have typed loosey goosey to avoid confusion.

    I'm fine with my n=1. Completely.

    Edited for quotes