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Treadmill Running vs. Actual Running

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  • firef1y72firef1y72 Posts: 1,280Member Member Posts: 1,280Member Member
    I can run outside for hours but struggle for more than 5min on the treadmill
  • Squish815Squish815 Posts: 98Member Member Posts: 98Member Member
    I find them quite different, and on balance think I prefer running outside however I actually don't mind the treadmill.

    I don't like running outside when it's dark where I live so I use the treadmill at the gym for early morning runs in winter. I also use it in summer when it's too hot as I do NOT cope well in the heat and the gym at least has air con!
  • Stockholm_AndyStockholm_Andy Posts: 625Member Member Posts: 625Member Member
    I haven't read the whole thread so apologies is this has been covered.

    When you run on a treadmill, obviously, the belt is moving not you. So you only have to propel yourself from the belt and land again. You are not pushing yourself against the static ground to gain momentum. The belt has the momentum. (Sorry that's a clunky paragraph).

    Anyhoo. Setting the treadmill to 1-2% incline will more accurately mimic outside running so you'll get a better cross over when the weathers better.

    I live in Sweden now and while running on snow is wonderful trying to run on icy surfaces is a nightmare so a treadmill is a great way to keep it up.
  • mitch16mitch16 Posts: 2,091Member Member Posts: 2,091Member Member
    VioletRojo wrote: »
    In my experience, running on a treadmill is physically much easier than running on the road, but mentally much harder. While running on the road is much harder physically, but easier mentally. The treadmill does some of the work for you, plus you don't get the terrain differences.

    I do think this sums it up... There are some other considerations for me but I don't think they necessarily make it much different--as long as I am running I am happy.

    Running outside--I live in New England so I have to contend with ice, snow, and early nightfall right now. If I time it right though, I can get out and run 4 miles and stretch in under 40 minutes. The roads where I live are narrow and there aren't many sidewalks so I have to contend with running against traffic. The roads are crowned so I do get a shortening on my right side due to that. And we have potholes/irregular road surfaces.

    Running inside--My closest gym is a YMCA so I have to contend with the January crowds. If someone wearing a lot of perfume/BO climbs on to the next treadmill, I have to contend with that. While the weather indoors is consistent, it's consistently warmer than I would choose to run.
  • 4bugsmama4bugsmama Posts: 2,797Member Member Posts: 2,797Member Member
    I've noticed the mechanics of the treadmill and the constant "feed" it gives with the belt, so I am appreciative for the input of increasing the incline to help with my transition to outdoor running. That being said, I also need to work on my breathing, it seems too heavy and I think that tires me out faster than if I could get my breathing under control. Any help with this part (the breathing)?
  • TacklewasherTacklewasher Posts: 7,104Member Member Posts: 7,104Member Member
    4bugsmama wrote: »
    I've noticed the mechanics of the treadmill and the constant "feed" it gives with the belt, so I am appreciative for the input of increasing the incline to help with my transition to outdoor running. That being said, I also need to work on my breathing, it seems too heavy and I think that tires me out faster than if I could get my breathing under control. Any help with this part (the breathing)?

    Run slower.

    How far or long and how fast are you running? Sorry if you've said this already.
  • spiriteagle99spiriteagle99 Posts: 2,238Member Member Posts: 2,238Member Member
    Agreed. Run slower. Start with the pace well below what you plan to run overall. Every 1/4 mile, go up .1. When you get to the point that you are breathing hard, drop the pace. Stay there for a while. If it starts feeling easy, go up again. FWIW, it usually takes me a mile or two to get into the groove. Some days I never do get up to the same pace I usually run outside. You need to listen to your body and run according to that day's fitness, not what you think you ought to be able to run.
  • sarahthessarahthes Posts: 3,399Member Member Posts: 3,399Member Member
    @OldAssDude I admire your perseverance but even I head indoors when it is -26C outside. Like yesterday.

    Mostly because I'm coming back from injury and got fatter while I couldn't run so I'm slow and I don't warm up enough with the short distances I'm running right now so I turn into a Sarahsicle.

    And my glasses freeze.
  • collectingbluescollectingblues Posts: 2,372Member Member Posts: 2,372Member Member
    sarahthes wrote: »
    @OldAssDude I admire your perseverance but even I head indoors when it is -26C outside. Like yesterday.

    Mostly because I'm coming back from injury and got fatter while I couldn't run so I'm slow and I don't warm up enough with the short distances I'm running right now so I turn into a Sarahsicle.

    And my glasses freeze.

    And vice versa: If it's 80/90F degrees, in 80+ percent humidity, I'm not going to run outside and get heat stroke.
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,800Member Member Posts: 5,800Member Member
    I prefer to run & bike outdoors, but I would rather do this on a machine than miss a work out due to climate, conflicting priorities, etc. We sold our elliptical and purchased a nice treadmill last year along with a bike trainer. Whenever we have to be on a tconn, read through documents, or just be in the house with the kids.

    I owe much of my resilience to my high school track coach who ran us snow, rain, or shine.
  • mitch16mitch16 Posts: 2,091Member Member Posts: 2,091Member Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    I prefer to run & bike outdoors, but I would rather do this on a machine than miss a work out due to climate, conflicting priorities, etc. We sold our elliptical and purchased a nice treadmill last year along with a bike trainer. Whenever we have to be on a tconn, read through documents, or just be in the house with the kids.

    I owe much of my resilience to my high school track coach who ran us snow, rain, or shine.

    @CSARdiver--what brand of treadmill/model did you purchase? My husband and I have been looking and the internet searches yield very different results for "quality".
  • rsignorencrsignorenc Posts: 2Member, Premium Member Posts: 2Member, Premium Member
    First off, keep up the running no matter where you're doing it! If you have the right clothing, running outside can not be beat. There's nothing like a run during colder temps to really get a good runner's high going. Good luck!
  • TacklewasherTacklewasher Posts: 7,104Member Member Posts: 7,104Member Member
    mitch16 wrote: »
    A friend of mine (Chicagoland area) slipped and fell on black ice while running this past weekend. Dislocated shoulder and broken finger (requiring surgery). Totally not worth running outside at all costs IMO.

    This is my fear. Especially as I like to run before sunup. Only so much a headlamp can do, so it's off to the gym and the TM.
  • rodmelchingrodmelching Posts: 65Member Member Posts: 65Member Member
    @mitch16 @Tacklewasher . . . have you ever tried yaktraks, rubber and metal cleats that slide over your running shoes for snow and ice? Just curious if anyone has used them in the winter months. I bought a pair at Costco a few weeks back but we haven't had any snow to try them out yet. Thanks . . Rod
  • 7lenny77lenny7 Posts: 3,033Member Member Posts: 3,033Member Member
    I love that you titled this "Treadmill Running vs. Actual Running"!

    I find actual running easier, mainly because I enjoy it so much more than treadmills. I've run outdoors in blizzards and in -35F wind chills and would even prefer that to a treadmill.
  • 7lenny77lenny7 Posts: 3,033Member Member Posts: 3,033Member Member
    @mitch16 @Tacklewasher . . . have you ever tried yaktraks, rubber and metal cleats that slide over your running shoes for snow and ice? Just curious if anyone has used them in the winter months. I bought a pair at Costco a few weeks back but we haven't had any snow to try them out yet. Thanks . . Rod

    @rodmelching I much prefer making screw shoes out of an older pair of running shoes. I've tried the yaktraks and I don't like that I can feel them stretch across my foot and constrict my toes a bit. It's just a feel think for me, it might be fine for you.

    Screw shoes are super easy to make, and super cheap. They don't damage the shoes in any appreciable way either. While I use older running shoes to do it, come springtime I'll take the screws out and use them normally.

    http://skyrunner.com/screwshoe.htm
  • rodmelchingrodmelching Posts: 65Member Member Posts: 65Member Member
    @7lenny7 . . . talk about some serious weather and snow running. Wow . . and the ice beard is a nice badge of honor. Way to get out there. I love putting the first set of shoe print in the snow on the trail but we don't get that much snow in Indiana. I will definetely check out the screwshoe. Thanks
  • OldAssDudeOldAssDude Posts: 1,430Member Member Posts: 1,430Member Member
    7lenny7 wrote: »
    corriepelc wrote: »
    For me, there's nothing better than running outside. I just love the feeling of being free to run wherever I want. I'm lucky as I live in California and even during the winter, I can still run outdoors.

    I'm lucky as I live in Minnesota and even during the winter, I can still run outdoors. ;)
    There is nothing like running outside in a heavy snow. It's magical! Ice beards are pretty cool too.

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    Dude!!!

    Now I got a man crush...

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    I live in Pennsylvania.
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