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Can somebody tell me where this "1200 Calorie" number came from ?

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  • EvamuttEvamutt Member Posts: 1,719 Member Member Posts: 1,719 Member
    UGH, mfp gave me 1210 calories/day for 1 lb/wk, I can't do that so doing 1/2 lb/wk
  • MikePTYMikePTY Member, Premium Posts: 3,820 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,820 Member
    Evamutt wrote: »
    UGH, mfp gave me 1210 calories/day for 1 lb/wk, I can't do that so doing 1/2 lb/wk

    Remember that doesn't include your exercise. So if you do exercise, that's more calories you can eat while keeping your rate of loss.
  • OooohToastOooohToast Member Posts: 257 Member Member Posts: 257 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    nooboots wrote: »
    1991court wrote: »
    My weightloss is being closely watch by my Dr first off just explaining that first!!

    He put me on a thousand calorie diet a month ago, I told him I feel more comfortable between 1300-1400 so thats what I started at, and lost 20lbs in May. My loss has slowed down but now I am very satisfied at a 1100-1200 calories a day. My goal from mfp is 1300 something... I don't feel deprived or starving, I am usually very full. Just pushing more protein and usually between 70oz - 100oz of water a day.

    When I go maintenance I am sure my calories will change. Shoot when pain management releases me and I can start boxing, I am sure my calories will change. Meaning go up again.

    My stats:
    Height: 5'5
    Sw:224
    Cw:200
    Gw: 145-130 wherever I feel happy.

    A genuine question - just because a doctor is watching the weight loss, how does that make the calorie deficit 'safe'?

    It's not really that it's safe. It's that there is a doctor monitoring your health so if some damage is being done it can be caught before it gets too bad (when a layperson would notice). Often it also means that Rx supplements are being administered to avoid deficiencies and possibly blood work at regular intervals as well.

    Unfortunately, some doctors simply don't know much about weight management and give patients arbitrarily low calorie targets with no further monitoring, which is no different than a person randomly choosing to undereat and accepting the risks that come with that.

    Wow, thats quite some statement.

    Perhaps the assumption re the Rx supplement in the US is more relevant than to us in the UK.

    Dr's here recommend as low as 800 (nutrtionally balanced) calories if the benefits of getting some weight off quickly outweigh the risks. Note I say risks - not known definitely going to happen outcomes which is how it comes across here sometimes. So when we talk about safe, we need to be talking in a more complete context perhaps rather than applying the same to everyone ?

    Being overseen by a doctor isnt just about being montitored for potential issues - its also about ensuring that it is appropriate for someone mentally and physically to even try a VLCD in the first place.

    I went racing through the pre diabetes criteria and was nudging the T2 in Feb this year. 800 calories NET a day later (I was actually consuming 1500), and apart from still being fat, I am back in the normal ranges for the other diabetic markers (FBG, BP and waist size). My calorie intake is upto 1500 - 2000 and I net in anything between 800 and 1500, depnding on whats going on with life.

    I am way more healthy than I was in Feb, I dont have scurvy, I still have my hair and teeth - there's beein an improvement in my skin and hormone balance and my sleep quality has improved immeasurabley. I am also far more inclined to exercise now it doesnt feel like I am dying after the first ten minutes.

    In no way am I saying that this means its ok for everyone - it is not. But to hand out the same lines to everyone about 1200 calories being the absolute minimum before serious issues / nutrtional deficiency is probably not qite right either.

    Finally, I suspect the proportion of people who struggle with maintenance is similar no matter how the weight was lost - not sure we have much scientifc study to prove it one way or the other ?

    This is how VLCD are being introduced in the UK via the NHS - there is lots and lots of good information here and is worth a read for those who are interested in this subject whether you can throw your weight (sorry) behind it or not :) Info is power !

    https://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/diabetes/reversal/#overview


  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 24,047 Member Member Posts: 24,047 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    nooboots wrote: »
    1991court wrote: »
    My weightloss is being closely watch by my Dr first off just explaining that first!!

    He put me on a thousand calorie diet a month ago, I told him I feel more comfortable between 1300-1400 so thats what I started at, and lost 20lbs in May. My loss has slowed down but now I am very satisfied at a 1100-1200 calories a day. My goal from mfp is 1300 something... I don't feel deprived or starving, I am usually very full. Just pushing more protein and usually between 70oz - 100oz of water a day.

    When I go maintenance I am sure my calories will change. Shoot when pain management releases me and I can start boxing, I am sure my calories will change. Meaning go up again.

    My stats:
    Height: 5'5
    Sw:224
    Cw:200
    Gw: 145-130 wherever I feel happy.

    A genuine question - just because a doctor is watching the weight loss, how does that make the calorie deficit 'safe'?

    It's not really that it's safe. It's that there is a doctor monitoring your health so if some damage is being done it can be caught before it gets too bad (when a layperson would notice). Often it also means that Rx supplements are being administered to avoid deficiencies and possibly blood work at regular intervals as well.

    Unfortunately, some doctors simply don't know much about weight management and give patients arbitrarily low calorie targets with no further monitoring, which is no different than a person randomly choosing to undereat and accepting the risks that come with that.

    Along these lines, I was watching an episode from this season's. "My 600 Pound Life". To Dr. Now it was obvious by his patient's lack of weight loss that she was not actually eating 1200 calories. After her not hitting her target weight loss goals for several months while thinking she was following the diet, he put her on a 600 calorie diet. He wanted her to actually eat 1200, and that's what happened.

    It's funny watching him spit out the calculations off the top of his head, "You should have lost 50 pounds this month but you only lost 9, so therefore you are actually eating X-Y amount of calories per day."

    Note: these patients have very aggressive weight loss targets, but for people their size getting the weight off fast can literally save their lives, so is more important than considerations for people who have much less weight to lose, are not monitored by a medical team, and should therefore lose it slower.
  • deannalfisherdeannalfisher Member, Premium Posts: 5,600 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,600 Member
    I honestly am not putting much stock in this because I feel there is unreliable (and poorly available) information for US. I see a dietician. I don't know how they decide on these numbers. They don't tell you everything, you have to research and figure out for yourself what's good for you.

    your dietician should be able to walk you through exactly how they determined their recommendations for you and they should review periodically and adjust...if they aren't doing then - then IMHO they are setting you up for failure in the long-run if you can't afford to continue seeing them or something else changes

    i use an online nutrition service, not a RD, but the chief science office has a PhD, so i trust him - i get my macros reviewed weekly (sometimes twice weekly by a coach) and we tweak my numbers every 2 to 3 weeks based on feedback. They tell me how they calculate (protein is a fixed number, but they will increase it if you ask; carbs/fat are more dynamics depending on the person)
  • apullumapullum Member Posts: 4,896 Member Member Posts: 4,896 Member
    I honestly am not putting much stock in this because I feel there is unreliable (and poorly available) information for US. I see a dietician. I don't know how they decide on these numbers. They don't tell you everything, you have to research and figure out for yourself what's good for you.

    If your dietician won't explain to you how they do their calculations or answer your questions, then you need to fire them and find someone who will help you understand. You're paying this person to give you professional advice. If they leave you feeling like you have to do your own research, then you're not getting the service you paid for.
  • wmd1979wmd1979 Member Posts: 469 Member Member Posts: 469 Member
    try2again wrote: »
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    try2again wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Many years ago I capped my calories at 1200 a day on my 6ft frame dropping down to 178lbs. Didn't kill me, nor was I starving 🤷🏾‍♂️

    1200 is never a healthy recommended amount for a male. Just because it didn't kill you doesn't mean that it was good for your health. Even if it didn't cause any negative health effects, that still doesn't mean it was recommended. There are plenty of smokers who live very long lives. Doesn't mean that smoking is fine.

    How are you quantifying what is good for ones health?


    Very likely, depending on how big of a deficit this represented for you and how long you were in it, you suffered some nutritional deficits and loss of lean muscle mass.

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10569458/why-eating-too-little-calories-is-a-bad-idea/p1

    If I stop lifting weights, taking my vitamins, I lose muscle mass and go into a nutritional deficiency compared to before. That doesn't make me "unhealthy", no different from when I lower my caloric intake to 1200 cal a day.








    What makes you think that anything you are saying is bringing value to this conversation? Just because it didn't kill you doesn't mean it was a wise or healthy decision on your part, and when you try to defend your foolish decisions, it could be encouraging others to make unhealthy decisions as well. So capping your calories at 1200 didn't kill you. Congrats for that. It still wasn't smart regardless of what you think. There is a reason that MFP has a minimum calorie threshold for both men and women, and if you are going to argue against that threshold, you should find another place to do it.

    And worth noting that this poster's profile states, "I don't really care about being 'healthy'".

    Good call out, I hadn't seen that. Just because that poster isn't interested in being healthy, that doesn't mean the rest of us shouldn't strive to be.
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