General Question - Why Do Doctors Push for Surgery?

2

Replies

  • missysippy930
    missysippy930 Posts: 2,577 Member
    edited August 2019
    Generally, I don’t think most doctors push for surgery. From what I have read, surgeons that specialize in WLS require potential patients to lose a certain amount of weight before the surgery is preformed.
    I do think that primary care doctors often times don’t know a lot about nutrition and losing weight, but it’s up to us as patients/consumers to ask questions and get satisfactory answers.
    I seldom actually see my doctor anymore. The PA, is who actually sees me. I know she suggested cutting carbs for me, when I had already lost a lot of weight through moderation and portion control of all foods. All my labs and BP, are good and I’m on no prescription medication. I ignored her advice.
  • nooboots
    nooboots Posts: 480 Member
    sivyaleah wrote: »
    Clarifying one point:

    When I wrote I average 0.5 pounds a week what that means is over this 9 month period, taking my weight loss in total and dividing it by 9 months it equals 0.5 a week.

    However, that does not mean I only lose 0.5 a week. Some weeks I don't lose like on our 2 week vacation for our anniversary (but at least there was no gain). Some, I've lost a pound or a bit more.

    So, the weight loss is not a static number. It fluctuates based on calories in/out and activity - just like everyone else - it just has average to 0.5 a week over time.

    You've done really well and should be proud of yourself. There is nothing wrong with your progress, however I worked out your average loss to be more than 0.5 lb a week, but even if it is, its great
  • missysippy930
    missysippy930 Posts: 2,577 Member
    nooboots wrote: »
    sivyaleah wrote: »
    Clarifying one point:

    When I wrote I average 0.5 pounds a week what that means is over this 9 month period, taking my weight loss in total and dividing it by 9 months it equals 0.5 a week.

    However, that does not mean I only lose 0.5 a week. Some weeks I don't lose like on our 2 week vacation for our anniversary (but at least there was no gain). Some, I've lost a pound or a bit more.

    So, the weight loss is not a static number. It fluctuates based on calories in/out and activity - just like everyone else - it just has average to 0.5 a week over time.

    You've done really well and should be proud of yourself. There is nothing wrong with your progress, however I worked out your average loss to be more than 0.5 lb a week, but even if it is, its great

    OP, I agree with nooboots.
    You are doing great and should be proud of how well you are doing!🌸
  • poisonesse
    poisonesse Posts: 507 Member
    First, a huge congrats on your loss, especially in such a short period of time! Second, I didn't read everyone else's replies, so this is just my take on it. If I were you and my doc pushed for surgery that I already told him I don't need, and that you obviously don't need (you don't weigh enough to warrant surgery) I'd simply find another doctor. I don't know what his personal agenda is, but it sounds like he gets a kick back for every surgery candidate he sends the surgeon's way. And yes, even here in the States, sad as it is to think about it, this DOES happen, and quite often. So yeah, my first move would be to check for a new doctor.
  • amyepdx
    amyepdx Posts: 750 Member
    sivyaleah wrote: »
    Clarifying one point:

    When I wrote I average 0.5 pounds a week what that means is over this 9 month period, taking my weight loss in total and dividing it by 9 months it equals 0.5 a week.

    However, that does not mean I only lose 0.5 a week. Some weeks I don't lose like on our 2 week vacation for our anniversary (but at least there was no gain). Some, I've lost a pound or a bit more.

    So, the weight loss is not a static number. It fluctuates based on calories in/out and activity - just like everyone else - it just has average to 0.5 a week over time.

    That’s what I was going to point out too! I agree you are doing great and there’s no reason for surgery that could potentially mess up your body forever.

    1/2 lb is a 1/2 lb and as someone who has backslid and gained 18 lbs after losing 98, I wish I was back to losing 1/2 lb a week.

    As Dr Now says - if you’re not losing, you’re gaining and he’s absolutely right!

    PS I’m 60 also ;)
  • lovelylosses
    lovelylosses Posts: 27 Member
    edited August 2019
    apullum wrote: »
    apullum wrote: »
    sxekev wrote: »
    Most doctors are unhealthy themselves. They're trained textbook style, and don't know the real reason why people gain weight. Gaining weight is usually a spiritual, psychological, emotional, or mental issue (or a combination of all of them). Knowing how to tackle that requires a specialized coach. A holistic health practitioner or a qualified therapist.

    Gaining weight is caused by consistently being in a calorie surplus.

    Knowing how to tackle that requires understanding how to consistently create a calorie deficit.

    Absolutely what you said above makes sense, but how can a person truly lose weight and keep it off, without understanding why they consistently overate to begin with? If it was truly as simple as calories in/calories out without any psychological or emotional work required, many, many more people would be at their goal weight and maintaining without issue.

    People gain weight when they take in more calories than they burn, on average.

    You stated that "gaining weight is usually a spiritual, psychological, emotional, or mental issue (or a combination of all of them)." However, being overweight does not mean you have any of these "issues." It simply means you overate. Some people have emotional or psychological reasons for overeating. Some do not.

    No I didn’t. You’re replying to the OP I think (I replied to your comment but I’m not the original person who said the above).
  • apullum
    apullum Posts: 4,888 Member
    apullum wrote: »
    apullum wrote: »
    sxekev wrote: »
    Most doctors are unhealthy themselves. They're trained textbook style, and don't know the real reason why people gain weight. Gaining weight is usually a spiritual, psychological, emotional, or mental issue (or a combination of all of them). Knowing how to tackle that requires a specialized coach. A holistic health practitioner or a qualified therapist.

    Gaining weight is caused by consistently being in a calorie surplus.

    Knowing how to tackle that requires understanding how to consistently create a calorie deficit.

    Absolutely what you said above makes sense, but how can a person truly lose weight and keep it off, without understanding why they consistently overate to begin with? If it was truly as simple as calories in/calories out without any psychological or emotional work required, many, many more people would be at their goal weight and maintaining without issue.

    People gain weight when they take in more calories than they burn, on average.

    You stated that "gaining weight is usually a spiritual, psychological, emotional, or mental issue (or a combination of all of them)." However, being overweight does not mean you have any of these "issues." It simply means you overate. Some people have emotional or psychological reasons for overeating. Some do not.

    No I didn’t. You’re replying to the OP I think (I replied to your comment but I’m not the original person who said the above).

    Sorry, you did not say the quoted text.

    It is still true that some people, but not all people, overeat due to psychological or emotional issues. It is not correct to claim that all or most people have psychological or emotional reasons for overeating.