Rice, cooked and uncooked

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Replies

  • sefajane1
    sefajane1 Posts: 322 Member
    KeelyM423 wrote: »
    Great tip , thank you.

    If you can, weigh the cooked rice once it's cool as the weight will drop quite a bit after the steam has evaporated.
  • tlpina82
    tlpina82 Posts: 229 Member
    KeelyM423 wrote: »
    So to be clear, cooked or uncooked the calories are the same?

    one quick thing that people are forgetting here.

    1 cup of uncooked rice will absorb a lot of water during cooking, turning the volume of 1 cup into about 3-5 cups.
    So, 1 cup of cooked rice (Without oil) has less grains than 1 cup of uncooked rice, making the cooked rice less caloric.

    Again... I am talking VOLUME.

    So... 1 cup of uncooked rice (About 200 grams) contains about 713 calories (a little more for basmatti, a little less for Sona Masoori) / divide that for your yield in cooked rice to get the accurate count.

    713 cals uncooked / 3 cups cooked = 237 calories per cup
    713 cals uncooked / 4 cups cooked = 178.25 calories per cup
    713 cals uncooked / 5 cups cooked = 142.6 calories per cup

    Just a thought.
  • sefajane1
    sefajane1 Posts: 322 Member
    tlpina82 wrote: »
    KeelyM423 wrote: »
    So to be clear, cooked or uncooked the calories are the same?

    one quick thing that people are forgetting here.

    1 cup of uncooked rice will absorb a lot of water during cooking, turning the volume of 1 cup into about 3-5 cups.
    So, 1 cup of cooked rice (Without oil) has less grains than 1 cup of uncooked rice, making the cooked rice less caloric.

    Again... I am talking VOLUME.

    So... 1 cup of uncooked rice (About 200 grams) contains about 713 calories (a little more for basmatti, a little less for Sona Masoori) / divide that for your yield in cooked rice to get the accurate count.

    713 cals uncooked / 3 cups cooked = 237 calories per cup
    713 cals uncooked / 4 cups cooked = 178.25 calories per cup
    713 cals uncooked / 5 cups cooked = 142.6 calories per cup

    Just a thought.

    Or use a food scale!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,871 Member
    sefajane1 wrote: »
    I cooked 1 cup (233g) of dry rice yesterday in 2 cups of water. The cooked rice weighed only 577g, so it's not necessarily 3 x the dry weight.

    Sure. Some of the water evaporates, typically. (I apologize for not pointing that out in my PP.)

    The evaporation is one of the things that makes weighing it dry a better way to do it. Depending on how long you cook the rice, and with how high a heat, in what type of cooking vessel (covered/not, sealed tight/not, etc.), the amount of evaporation will be different. The implication is that therefore the calories for a given cooked weight will vary, based on how much water it contains vs. what evaporated, in addition to how much water was used in the first place.

    But the water itself doesn't materially change the calories from what was in the dry rice, irrespective of how much water evaporates or doesn't. OP seems to be suggesting that cooking rice adds calories. No. ;)
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,282 Member
    Found on google that the difference between rice uncooked and cooked in uncooked times 3.

    So 100gr uncooked rice good for 342 kcal makes 1026 kcal when it's cooked.

    Anybody recognize these calculations

    100g of uncooked rice is going to make 342 kcal of rice regardless...it'll just weigh more after cooking since it absorbed the water...which didn't add calories.
  • KeelyM423
    KeelyM423 Posts: 20 Member
    O my those little grains of rice are causing a storm lol lol
  • nooboots
    nooboots Posts: 480 Member
    I cook up some rice and weigh it dry. I then divide it into portions (say about 4 or however many it makes) and put it in my recipes and have it as 'one serving' each time and the calories are already calculated for me. I dont weigh the cooked portion.
  • MikePTY
    MikePTY Posts: 3,819 Member
    sefajane1 wrote: »
    I cooked 1 cup (233g) of dry rice yesterday in 2 cups of water. The cooked rice weighed only 577g, so it's not necessarily 3 x the dry weight.

    This is why weighing dry (or raw) vs cooked for foods in general is the better way to go about it. Various cooking methods and times will change the amount of cooked weight. So there is no way to reverse engineer dry weight from cooked weight that doesn't allow for a fair bit of margin of error.