Why is it so hard to stay motivated?!

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Replies

  • Annie_01
    Annie_01 Posts: 3,115 Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    For me, motivation isn't a factor. Habits and behaviors that support my goals are what matter. Motivation comes and goes and can't be relied upon.

    The bolded above is what got me started. Believe me...with the temperatures that we are having (95+ days) I am not motivated to get out in the heat. The goals that I set are what is getting me out there. They have nothing to do with being thin or fit...however being thinner and fitter will help me accomplish what I want to do.

    While being healthier/thinner should be enough motivation I found it too vague. I needed something that I wanted to accomplish. When I found that "thing" everything became much easier...the diet...the working out. This has also carried over into other aspects of my life. I am so much more organized.

    I also made a plan. I found out that I actually do well with a plan/schedule. I have a board right above my desk...in my face...I look up and there it is...I can't deny it...can't forget...it helps to push me out the door or in to my workout area.

    Find your "thing"...plan it out...make a commitment to yourself.

  • Clairin
    Clairin Posts: 95 Member
    If you focus on the nice aspects like how good it is for you, how good you will feel after doing it, the nice people you will see or nice music you will hear. If you have sports clothing you like to wear it helps. It's attitude in part that helps. Many people see sports time as their me time and their release of stress, that's an attitude they have. Also you have to form a routine, a habit, I'm kind of addicted to training, I love the feeling. It's actually called a 'high' for a reason. In truth you need to be disciplined with yourself. I say to myself sometimes 'clair you are going because you are going.' like my mom would have said to me as a child. I bargain with myself sometimes and say ,'ok go for 20 minutes on the treadmill that's all.' typically I get there, loosen up then stay much longer.
  • bebeisfit
    bebeisfit Posts: 951 Member
    So much great advice. Start slow but consistent. 10 or 15 or 20 minutes EVERY DAY. Dont kill yourself, go one step further than the day before.

    I dont know your fitness level but whatever you do, it's more than sitting on the sofa.

    Make it a priority! Do anything. Dance! Fly a kite. Get outside or walk inside with that Leslie lady.

    Do it! Soon, you'll want to do it more.
  • Dcouture11 wrote: »
    I want to workout regularly, I just can’t find the motivation to get out there and do it. I always have an excuse that I’m too busy, have no time, will do it tomorrow, etc... any tips on making fitness into a lifestyle rather than viewing it as a chore? Thanks!

    Figure out what you love that is active.

    I can't sit around. I told myself Sunday was a rest day and ended up on a hike anyway because I was bored out of my mind.
  • pondee629
    pondee629 Posts: 2,487 Member
    Motivation is what allows you sprint at the end of a long run to record a PB. Motivation is what causes the "momentum swings" in any sport or game. Motivation is what allows you press the last rep at your PB weight. Discipline, determination and desire are what gets you through your daily workouts.
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,256 Member
    Motivation is an emotion. If you allow emotions to govern your life you had better prepare for a life of chaos and disappointment.

    Choose discipline. Establish a routine. Set small goals and make sure you hit these. Build these up into habits and behaviors and hold to this. Then set larger goals and repeat the process.
  • CSARdiver wrote: »
    Motivation is an emotion. If you allow emotions to govern your life you had better prepare for a life of chaos and disappointment.

    Choose discipline. Establish a routine. Set small goals and make sure you hit these. Build these up into habits and behaviors and hold to this. Then set larger goals and repeat the process.

    This
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,262 Member
    edited October 2019
    The OP looks pretty young, but I'd like to say the ability to move is a gift. If you don't use the gift it will be taken away from you. It will be gradual over time, but I've had friends who chose not be active "all of a sudden" realize they couldn't run half a block with their kids or participate in a volleyball game at a family gathering without feeling ready to die.

    It's really your choice. I saw a gentleman at the gym a couple days ago using a walker and wearing a WWII veteran hat. He's chosen to use the gift.

    Best of luck.
  • WC1982
    WC1982 Posts: 137 Member
    It’s became a life style for me coming from the military. However as I get older and life happens I now do it more for me and keeping up with my kids
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    MrKilt wrote: »
    Find someone to tell you to get off your lardy a55. When you start getting into it Nd seeing results, you will physicalky start to feel withdrawal symptoms if you do NOT work out. Dont be afraid to ask someone to kick your *kitten* for the first while. Thats why MFP exists.

    I almost wish that the bolded was true for me, almost.
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    I think the two most important pieces of advice here are to find something that you enjoy doing and to allow your goals to drive your motivation. Also realize that there will probably be times that you don't want to do X activity and there will probably be some things downsides to the activity, even if you like it a lot

    For example, I enjoy rowing and cycling and I do both of them a lot. Rowing has more than a few things that make it unenjoyable - I really don't enjoy waking up at 4:15am and I don't always like rowing when it's cold. I also don't like rowinging in difficult water conditions. That said, most of those things are totally worth it to get to row and the rough conditions happen seldomly enough that it's ok - that and it's unrealistic to assume that regattas will always have nice flat water.

    I'm also more or less forcing myself to lift weights. This is despite my general dislike of strength training, discomfort with being in weight rooms, etc. That said, I'm doing it because I know that it will make me a stronger cyclist and a stronger rower. After multiple failed attempts, I ended up having to find a way to do it lowers the barrier to entry - I signed up for a weight lifting class at my alma mater. The accountability of a class is helpful and I'm learning correct technique. It will also, knock on wood, give me enough confidence to be able to continue once the class ends.