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The ad won’t kill Peloton, but this will.....

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  • tbright1965tbright1965 Posts: 844Member, Premium Member Posts: 844Member, Premium Member
    Avid cyclists are more likely to go with https://zwift.com/

    Mount your bike on a smart trainer. Set up your mat, laptop, fan and a big screen TV and you are in business.

    You can upload your workouts to Strava as well.
    I cant decide if the 2,000$ cost of the bike will help of hurt them. It certainly prevents plenty of people from being able to afford it. It might help with membership retention since in addition to the "I'll start back up" mentality already mentioned you have the "well I already sunk xyz money into this, so I can't just give that up".

    After all the hype calms down I can't see it really lasting long term. It is really expensive for most casual exercisers and lacks the social experience many casual exercises seek (lots of people who go to cycle classes enjoy seeing friends there). If you aren't looking for the social scene you can probably get the same thing out of most stationary bikes and a youtube workout video. For more serious cyclists I have a hard time seeing them sink the money into an at home bike. Speaking as a runner, most runners much prefer hitting to road or trails and running with friends. The treadmill is more of a last resort when the weather or timing is just horrible. I wouldn't spend 4,000 on my last resort option. I would think serious cyclists are more likely to put their money into their real bikes.

  • sammie754sammie754 Posts: 15Member, Premium Member Posts: 15Member, Premium Member
    Love my Peloton bike. Going on 2 years and still riding strong.
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 6,279Member Member Posts: 6,279Member Member
    sammie754 wrote: »
    Love my Peloton bike. Going on 2 years and still riding strong.

    I'm glad you like it. What, I think, spelled trouble for Peloton is when their CEO told the story that VCs (Venture Capital Investors) told him that they priced the bike 100% too low originally, when it wasn't selling. By doubling the price, the mystique was born. Sales took off. Problem is, it's still only worth 50% of what the cost is now and people have heard that story.

    This is a known human factor and how we chase aesthetics over reason. If a product is priced too low it loses the luster of being an "exclusive" product.

    A friend owns a specialized audio company and started marketing small, high quality amplifiers at low prices and almost went out of business. He engaged a marketing company who had him increase the size of the units, add lights and a blower (both useless), and quadruple the price and he could not keep up with demand. It pays to know what your customer wants.

  • ritzvinritzvin Posts: 2,488Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,488Member, Premium Member
    For more serious cyclists I have a hard time seeing them sink the money into an at home bike. Speaking as a runner, most runners much prefer hitting to road or trails and running with friends. The treadmill is more of a last resort when the weather or timing is just horrible. I wouldn't spend 4,000 on my last resort option. I would think serious cyclists are more likely to put their money into their real bikes.

    Considering [1] the popularity of Zwift, and [2] that (ETA: smart) direct drive trainers have come down to the $800 price point, I doubt they'll be seeing any cyclists buying these things. ... And there are plenty who will spend that money on a fat bike+studded tires before resorting to virtual cycling.
    edited December 2019
  • traumanurse870traumanurse870 Posts: 18Member Member Posts: 18Member Member
    The ad won't hurt Peloton. But, Ryan Reynolds definitely seized an opportunity when they made the gin ad. LOL!
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 9,598Member Member Posts: 9,598Member Member
    I cant decide if the 2,000$ cost of the bike will help of hurt them. It certainly prevents plenty of people from being able to afford it. It might help with membership retention since in addition to the "I'll start back up" mentality already mentioned you have the "well I already sunk xyz money into this, so I can't just give that up".

    After all the hype calms down I can't see it really lasting long term. It is really expensive for most casual exercisers and lacks the social experience many casual exercises seek (lots of people who go to cycle classes enjoy seeing friends there). If you aren't looking for the social scene you can probably get the same thing out of most stationary bikes and a youtube workout video. For more serious cyclists I have a hard time seeing them sink the money into an at home bike. Speaking as a runner, most runners much prefer hitting to road or trails and running with friends. The treadmill is more of a last resort when the weather or timing is just horrible. I wouldn't spend 4,000 on my last resort option. I would think serious cyclists are more likely to put their money into their real bikes.

    I don't know any cyclists who own a Peleton. I know people with bikes that cost much more, and could afford one, but see zero value in a bike you can't ride (from one place to another). For about 1/3 the price you can get a very good trainer to use the bike you already have and that fits you like a give indoors. And then you can also use it outdoors, which is why you got started in the first place.

    With the trainer option, if Zwift goes out of business there are competitors to turn to. What happens if Peleton goes out of business?
  • pjwrtpjwrt Posts: 163Member, Premium Member Posts: 163Member, Premium Member
    I don't know any cyclists who own a Peleton. I know people with bikes that cost much more, and could afford one, but see zero value in a bike you can't ride (from one place to another)...
    That's me, but I have a stair stepper for our long, rainy winter.

  • bobsburgersfanbobsburgersfan Posts: 2,613Member Member Posts: 2,613Member Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    This is a known human factor and how we chase aesthetics over reason. If a product is priced too low it loses the luster of being an "exclusive" product.

    A friend owns a specialized audio company and started marketing small, high quality amplifiers at low prices and almost went out of business. He engaged a marketing company who had him increase the size of the units, add lights and a blower (both useless), and quadruple the price and he could not keep up with demand. It pays to know what your customer wants.
    Stories like this are why I loved marketing classes in college. It's fascinating what makes people respond.
  • sammie754sammie754 Posts: 15Member, Premium Member Posts: 15Member, Premium Member
    I have both a road bike and a Peloton and prefer the Peloton. There are about 3 months a year that I can actually ride outside and can't ride from one place to another anyways since I live in a rural area.
    edited December 2019
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 9,598Member Member Posts: 9,598Member Member
    I have a road bike and cross country skis. When bike season ends I go to the mountains and follow snowy trails through the woods and meadows. It looks like the world is coated with magic. ❤️ ❄️
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