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Losing 100 lbs With Phit-N-Phat Podcast Discussion

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  • mmdeveaummdeveau Posts: 65Member Member Posts: 65Member Member
    @mmccloy12 - I'm sorry you had such a hard time with your co-workers. In addition to the pushiness, the unsolicited diet advice would have put me over the top - I would have told her that today wasn't my cheat day. You dealt with it very well!

    I'm lucky that I work with supportive people who respect boundaries and don't push too hard. If anyone's been a food pusher lately, it's been me! I've brought all my leftover Christmas cookies in - enough to put a huge plastic container out two days in a row. Then I brought a large container of leftover cookies and brownies in from my cousin's funeral in and left it in the kitchen. Luckily, a lot of other people also work on my floor, too.

    I can think of one time that I refused something that people questioned. We got pizza lunch as a reward for contributing to United Way. (Food as a reward? Don't get me started.) We had just had pizza at a meeting about two weeks before, too. When people asked if I was going to have any, I just said that I brought my lunch and I was looking forward to eating it. Really, all I would have eaten was one slice of pizza - not worth it. Just because it's free doesn't mean I need to eat it!

    @hlr1987 - Hmm, I know for my mom's pudding I might have taken a serving and then savored a bite or two. And maybe hope no one noticed I didn't finish it! As for your husband, I've only got a similar idea as @theleadmare. Maybe tell him that you'll pack the leftovers for lunch in the next day or two so you can enjoy it again at that time? And then actually eat the leftovers. (I know some don't like leftovers, but I never mind them and I can't afford to not eat my leftovers.) I know the people closest to us often have the hardest time dealing with the changes we make in our lives, and often resist in ways we do not expect or anticipate.
  • hlr1987hlr1987 Posts: 92Member Member Posts: 92Member Member
    @theleadmare the main problem was that I'd already planned for the week where that food would go and my lunches are already prepared. My normal reaction would be to use it as a reason why I couldn't eat reasonably that day and go completely crazy for days after as well. He's normally supportive he just didn't think because he was being an idiot. He's always been in tune with his hunger cues, and wanted more so he just made ALL the food and was a bit surprised when I said no, actually this is enough for me.

    I'm listening to the most recent episode on arguing to be fat and making notes.
    So far my thoughts are- I argue to be fat when there's extra food around because I hate it going to waste. Or when I haven't been able to fit my day into this all or nothing mentality, and done a *kitten* load of exercise or met my macros. It's a lot more comfortable to tell myself that it's pointless to try today, than to say to myself that doing OK is the aim - rather than perfect - because there's not a clear picture of sucess or failure in terms of OK. In the long term, it means that if you take my meal prep away, or if I'm in a situation where every meal is a social event with drinking on holiday, or I can't run, then I've lost my coping mechanism and mentally telling myself I've already failed so go for it, eat and drink everything.
  • AlexandraFindsHerself1971AlexandraFindsHerself1971 Posts: 479Member Member Posts: 479Member Member
    One thing that helps me is that my stomach has shrunk. I CAN'T eat All The Food. Knowing I'll run into that very physical limitation is helpful. It doesn't matter if I pile my plate high, because I have a very limited volume. And I usually do okay with picking things that even if they aren't going to fit my macros, are going to be good food to get me through til the next meal.

    Of course, it helps that I like to cook, I like to cook for others, and in my family I am now in the generation that does the work. (As opposed to the generation that hosts and sits back (mom) and the generation that assists and brings the side dishes (sons) ) I always try to make sure that at a potluck or whatever I bring enough food that even if everything else is stuff I can't eat, I'm safe with a serving of my own food. (But I have fructose intolerance, and IBS, and when everything sweet is bathed in commercial caramel sauce or cherry pie filling, and everything savory is based on beans or kale....(sigh))
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,886Member Member Posts: 4,886Member Member
    mmdeveau wrote: »
    @mmccloy12 - I'm sorry you had such a hard time with your co-workers. In addition to the pushiness, the unsolicited diet advice would have put me over the top - I would have told her that today wasn't my cheat day. You dealt with it very well!

    I'm lucky that I work with supportive people who respect boundaries and don't push too hard. If anyone's been a food pusher lately, it's been me! I've brought all my leftover Christmas cookies in - enough to put a huge plastic container out two days in a row. Then I brought a large container of leftover cookies and brownies in from my cousin's funeral in and left it in the kitchen. Luckily, a lot of other people also work on my floor, too.

    I don't consider bringing in food and leaving it being a food pusher!

    I also had to get over the "if it's free it's the universe telling me I should eat it" thing. In my first real serious job we had a running joke (all thin 20-somethings) that if the workplace paid it had no calories, and I think there definitely was a tendency to eat like that that I adopted for far too long even though it was never a serious comment, of course.

    Thinking about this broader topic of workplace eating, I think having co-workers who noticed what I ate (or commented on it) would be bothersome, whether intended to be supportive or not. (Not saying that's what you were saying, but just where my thoughts went.) I've never been in a situation where co-workers or non family members thought it was okay to comment on my food choices or presume why, and that would make me very uncomfortable (although probably more likely to avoid eating around them, and definitely not likely to eat more.)

    I do get "lemurcat, there are donuts (or cake or bagels or whatever) in the breakroom. Better hurry before it's gone!" and I'll say "oh, thanks, I will!" and then ignore it.

    My office is mostly people who are reasonably health conscious--or who just do their own thing--and don't get food together unless it's an official workplace lunch (which isn't uncommon, every other Friday). On those workplace lunches there are sometimes easy good choices and sometimes not. I like them for social reasons (although skipping because you are busy is not going to be thought of as weird), but have occasionally brought my own food and if someone asks I'll just say I forgot about the lunch and so brought my food, but wanted to be social (or maybe that the place ordered from is not my favorite, which is certainly sometimes true, no one cares about that either).

    One thing that helped me, although I'm sure it would not help everyone, was that I did not talk to anyone at work about trying to lose and most didn't notice until I'd lost a bunch--or at least didn't say anything until then.

    I have had it come up where I am eating with someone who likes to justify ordering things by asking if I want to share (or would have some), and I feel bad saying no (and even if I do and she gets it, she keeps offering it). Because it is sometimes something I find tempting I don't like this, but it's my deal, and I've learned it's okay to say no (or that if I say yes -- like at an Indian place getting naan for the table when I had decided not to have it -- that it was a choice I had agency over, I could have chosen not to have it and no one would really have cared).

    I stopped drinking years ago, and at first I was convinced people would notice or would be wanting me to drink and mostly that hasn't been the case, so I think that past experience was helpful. I also just do consider it weird and rude for others to comment on what someone (including me) is eating that if it did happen I'd be likely to laugh and not feel like I had to get into it. (Again, it's probably helpful that that is more my social surroundings.)

    My family is a little different, but luckily for me not an issue in terms of being food pushers (well, my stepmom is a food pusher and an amazing cook, but cooks super healthfully and is health conscious herself and hasn't been difficult if I eat less of something than she assumes one would, as has happened -- that she's Korean and a little judgy about weight issues is probably one reason she's cool with selecting smaller portions, heh, as she does assume I'm watching my weight but doesn't think ill of it).
    edited February 10
  • mmdeveaummdeveau Posts: 65Member Member Posts: 65Member Member
    Has anyone tried her coffee recipe?

    I've heard about putting butter or oil in coffee for a while. Looking at my diet, I realize I don't get a lot of good fat in it. My nails have been really brittle, and my hair and my skin as been really dry. So I've added a teaspoon to my morning coffee for the past few days. I don't ever envision myself going whole hog with her recipe, though the frother would be nice if it helps emulsify the oil. Stirring works well enough for me!

    Call me crazy, but my skin has felt less dry the last few days. I don't expect that nails and hair would show an immediate effect, but if it's helping my skin this much I'm optimistic.
  • mmccloy12mmccloy12 Posts: 135Member, Premium Member Posts: 135Member, Premium Member
    @mmdeveau I have not tried it but I looked at that the other day. I listened to one of the podcasts that she talked about it and how important it is to get the good fats. I am sure you have seen the recipe and her products that she likes...the cocoa butter wafers and the MCT. Not in my budget for the MCT oil right now, but I may order the cocoa butter.

    Where did you get the oil and did you use the cocoa butter wafers?
  • mmdeveaummdeveau Posts: 65Member Member Posts: 65Member Member
    mmccloy12 wrote: »
    @mmdeveau I have not tried it but I looked at that the other day. I listened to one of the podcasts that she talked about it and how important it is to get the good fats. I am sure you have seen the recipe and her products that she likes...the cocoa butter wafers and the MCT. Not in my budget for the MCT oil right now, but I may order the cocoa butter.

    Where did you get the oil and did you use the cocoa butter wafers?

    I don't think the MCT oil is in the budget for me either! MCT is an acronym for Medium Chain Triglyceride. I studied a lot of chemistry and also nutrition as part of my nursing curriculum and could get pretty technical here, but just know that the easiest place to find food-grade MCTs anywhere is in coconut oil -it's just not as refined as the MCT product; off-the-shelf coconut oil also has long-chain triglycerides. So, I am just putting a teaspoon of coconut oil in my coffee at the moment. I use Trader Joe's Organic Triple Filtered Coconut Oil.

    I looked for the cocoa butter wafers at Trader Joe's but didn't find any. I didn't get to check the organic section at my regular grocery store this past week, either. I have a sneaking suspicion Whole Foods will have some but I hate going there for just one thing. And the bag of it she links to on Amazon is just way too big to store if it turns out that I don't like it! I am curious about the taste, though...

    Long story, short: I'm happy using one teaspoon of coconut oil in my coffee for now, while I figure out if it's making a difference for me. I like the amount because it doesn't add too many calories to my day. And if I decide not to continue, I would use the coconut oil for other food preparation. I like my coffee (Trader Joe's Barista Blend) well enough that I can drink it black, I'm not one to make a huge fuss over coffee with some kind of elaborate preparation.
  • aliciap0116aliciap0116 Posts: 180Member, Premium Member Posts: 180Member, Premium Member
    I checked into the coffee recipe as well. It is intriguing but it's not in my budget, calorie or otherwise, at the moment! It looked like 260 calories all in. That would also break my fasting period and I need my coffee/tea to get going. That said, I have tried to add in more healthy fats like avocado, pumpkin seeds, nuts, and full fat dressing, which make my salads more yummy and filling.

    Coconut oil is amazing! I use it on my skin too and I feel like sometimes it is the only thing that will penetrate dry winter skin.

    This week has been a rough one and yesterday I felt so motivated to eat in response to very emotional and stressful day. I relied on the concept she discusses about "revenge" or pity eating and thinking about how eating would not help fix the problem and would just make me feel worse the next day. I did help that I didn't have some fabulous ice cream in the freezer. LOL. But I didn't eat because I was having a bad day and I am glad for it!

    I am listening to the podcast to and from work and while making dinner unless my family is around. I feel like I am reprogramming 48 years of bad habits and thoughts. Love it.
  • mmccloy12mmccloy12 Posts: 135Member, Premium Member Posts: 135Member, Premium Member
    @mmdeveau Good to know, thank you! I already have the coconut oil in the pantry! We have a place called Everman's I am going to see if they have the cocoa butter and possibly try it out.

    I try to include avocados and grab them when I think about it...I usually have almonds everyday if I have them. But I know I can benefit from more healthy fats. I live in a humid climate so dry skin isn't as much of a problem but I know it will still be beneficial!

    @aliciap0116 way to go working through the emotional and stressful day...it is rewarding to get through it and realize that we can break that habit of eating our feelings! I still have some work to do but I feel the same way about the podcasts...I mean some of it isn't rocket science but when she says it, it's like, yeah she is so right! It's like she is in my head :D

    Do you guys remember her talking about sugar in one of her podcasts? She mentioned a book called The Obesity Code...I just downloaded it on Audible...had a free credit. Has anyone read it? The author talks about the intermittent fasting too from reading the intro to it. I sorta do IF in that I rarely eat breakfast, just my coffee...but I do put creamer in it, so technically I am not fasting. But I am curious to see what the book has to say about it and the sugar!
  • AlexandraFindsHerself1971AlexandraFindsHerself1971 Posts: 479Member Member Posts: 479Member Member
    I use coconut oil on my hair, but my own use of fats is just to use them sensibly in cooking; a tablespoon of grapeseed oil in the cast iron skillet to saute meat, or a half-teaspoon of bacon drippings melted over sprouts, or the ounce of heavy cream added to a reduction sauce to finish it.

    I know that for myself, my ability to reduce sugar in my diet is underpinned by the use of fat in an intelligent manner. If I cook low fat, I can eat until I hurt and not be sated. With that little bit of cream in the sauce, let us say, I eat my portion, and I am done. Nothing more wanted. And that's what is helping me lose.
  • aliciap0116aliciap0116 Posts: 180Member, Premium Member Posts: 180Member, Premium Member
    I downloaded a sample of the Obesity Code but haven't read it yet. Sugar is evil, though!! I read Sugar Blues in college and was horrified about what it does to your body. But it wasn't mainstream in 1990; I was young, had a great metabolism, and could eat anything. If only I had started this journey 30 years ago!!

    @mmccloy12 it's controversial but I have read that eating/drinking less than 50 calories will not cause your digestive/endocrine system to kick in, so you won't break your fast unless you are over that amount. In an ideal world I would start the day with green tea (I love Stash Pomegranate Raspberry) but I find things hard on my stomach without a touch of cream or honey. I tend to do plain chai tea with a few tbps of Califia Almondmilk creamer. I love the hazelnut for a touch of sweet.

    @theleadmare smart on the fat. I have been looking to protein for that but your approach completely makes sense.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,886Member Member Posts: 4,886Member Member
    mmdeveau wrote: »
    Has anyone tried her coffee recipe?

    I've heard about putting butter or oil in coffee for a while. Looking at my diet, I realize I don't get a lot of good fat in it. My nails have been really brittle, and my hair and my skin as been really dry. So I've added a teaspoon to my morning coffee for the past few days. I don't ever envision myself going whole hog with her recipe, though the frother would be nice if it helps emulsify the oil. Stirring works well enough for me!

    Call me crazy, but my skin has felt less dry the last few days. I don't expect that nails and hair would show an immediate effect, but if it's helping my skin this much I'm optimistic.

    Oh, is she a bulletproof coffee person?

    I won't do that because it doesn't sound good to me and I like my coffee black (and almost calorie free).

    I do think healthy fats are important, but I'm never low on them since I like them so much -- I eat half an avocado and a couple of servings of nuts and/or seeds daily, love olives, use olive oil in salad dressings (and a little in cooking, although I'm trying not to rely on it as much), and occasional fatty fish.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,886Member Member Posts: 4,886Member Member
    I use coconut oil on my hair, but my own use of fats is just to use them sensibly in cooking; a tablespoon of grapeseed oil in the cast iron skillet to saute meat, or a half-teaspoon of bacon drippings melted over sprouts, or the ounce of heavy cream added to a reduction sauce to finish it.

    I love coconut oil in cosmetic (skin and hair) products. I just love the smell and feel of it.

    I use it in cooking some and again like the smell.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,886Member Member Posts: 4,886Member Member
    Re time-restricted eating, I'm not a fan of Fung at all, but heard Dr. Satchin Panda on a podcast -- he wrote The Circadian Code which gives an argument for why TRE could be beneficial. I don't totally know if I buy it -- I do know that working with one's own schedule is important and I lost 90 lbs easily while eating at 6, noon, and 9 or 9:30, so it's certainly not necessary. However, I've been unsatisfied with that schedule for a while (late afternoon is tougher than it used to be), and mostly eating that late ends up causing me to go to bed too late and I made a resolution this year to really work on improving my sleep.

    Anyway, related to this I read Panda's book and decided to give TRE a try. He focuses on only a 10-12 hour window for most people, not the shorter ones that are typically used for IF. He also gives reasons why earlier may be better (although again I think natural rhythms and schedules are important). For me, breakfast is important since I really prefer to eat after a workout and I run most mornings, so I decided to try eating between 7 and 5. The exception is when I go out to dinner, but even then I typically finish by 7, since we often go out before seeing a play or the symphony. So on those days I skip breakfast or eat between 9 and 7, depending. I thought not having dinner after I got home on weekdays would be hard, but it's not, and I feel like I have more time and also am finding it easier to get to bed at a reasonable hour and sleep better, so for now I'm going to keep this up.

    Although I am doing it and liking it, I really wish that IF wasn't being pushed as something everyone needs to do (as it sometimes seems it is these days). I enjoy the usually common sense advice of the NoMeatAthlete guys, for example (I am not a vegan, but I am actively trying to eat meat less often), but they were also pushing it as something super easy that everyone could do and as if it were the only alternative to eating constantly throughout the day (no matter when my meals are I only eat 3). I think it is possible that for most it's a really easy and doable change, but for a while for me it seemed not possible in that I like breakfast after working out in the morning and could not possibly eat earlier than 9 (maybe 8:30 if everything went well) if I cooked dinner at home, even though I am a fast cook. While I decided to make changes that would work for me, for many thinking they had to give up something like a home cooked dinner would be a huge sacrifice, and my own experience shows it's not actually something that it important to do if the goal is simply health and weight loss.
  • AlexandraFindsHerself1971AlexandraFindsHerself1971 Posts: 479Member Member Posts: 479Member Member
    I think what it comes down to is that everyone's different. I know right off that there's things that I just can't do. Name a food considered healthy, and it probably is either a problem because too much free carbs, too much lactose, too much fructose, or too much fiber, all of which will make me very miserable and often chained to the toilet. Doesn't mean I don't see the point of doing things like eating more leafy greens. (Wish I could)

    I think overall we have to try things and see what works. Even calorie counting; I am sure there are people who find budgeting their calories to be triggering, awful, and non-workable. For me, it's the same sort of game I played with my food budget when I was poor; how much good food can I get for the money?

    I had fast food tonight. Girlfriend wanted a specific thing after her sleep study was over (she did it in the daytime), Boyfriend also finds that to be a food of indulgence and was using food for comfort, and, well, by the time we would have gotten back I would have been too hungry to eat sensibly. So I checked my calories, had an idea of my budget.... and had ten chicken nuggets and about half a small serving of fries, with water (I gave up soda long ago) and brought my day in under budget without any pain. I was pretty proud of that, in the way I used to be when I caught New York Strips on sale and had room in the freezer.

    I'm not going to eat there any more if I don't HAVE to, though. They can go do that together and I'll stay home and make something. If I ate 650 calories of my own cooking I'd be lying on the couch in a happy food coma, too full for anything. This didn't fill me up and didn't satisfy me, and I've had to fend off snacking a couple times before I got home. That's not good food for me. And I'm proud that I can recognize that and say it. And glad that I have a family that will respect it. (And it's nice for the two of them to have a "thing" that's theirs.)
  • aliciap0116aliciap0116 Posts: 180Member, Premium Member Posts: 180Member, Premium Member
    My husband brought home 2 leftover dominos pizzas from school this evening, heated them up in the oven and suggested I just make side salads for dinner. I was happy to make the salads but there was no way I was going to eat left over Dominos. If I have pizza I am going to have amazing pizza and it is going to be hot and fresh! I made an egg omelet instead for myself. Credit to Corrine for not worry about wasting food, hurting feelings or going off track because of someone else’s actions. This is a classic situation where I previously would have rationalized that life intervened and just gone with the flow.

    I should add that he said “so you can’t eat pizza now?” To which I responded that I just don’t care for Dominos and if I’m going to have pizza it better be good. He accepted that but I don’t think he was able to enjoy his pizza as much!
    edited February 14
  • AlexandraFindsHerself1971AlexandraFindsHerself1971 Posts: 479Member Member Posts: 479Member Member
    @aliciap0116: My girlfriend and boyfriend actually say that they don't like going out for dinner much; they'd rather stay home and eat my cooking. So would I. GOOD pizza is pretty easy to make at home.

    Oooo. I wonder if, when we get the new house, my family would go for me putting a wood-fired pizza and bread oven in the back yard? (subsides into foodie ponderings)
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,886Member Member Posts: 4,886Member Member
    Glad you were able to decide to have what you wanted, alicia. I think stuff like that gets easier over time. (I definitely understand how easy it can be to decide "it's just life" and going with the flow, and I also very much understand not wanting to waste cals on a "treat" that's not even a treat.)
  • hlr1987hlr1987 Posts: 92Member Member Posts: 92Member Member
    I had a conversation a while ago about the fact that I wasn't giving up having pastries for breakfast, only recognising that as it wouldn't fill me up for the hours until lunch it wasn't worth eating a stale pastry right now. Good for you @aliciap0116 :smile:
    I have had a very rough plan to build a brick pizza oven in our garden for the last two years @theleadmare, because fresh sourdough pizza is the best thing on the planet (to me) only life keeps getting in the way as usual. Maybe I should make that a motivation this year, and dream about warm weekends again while it rains constantantly here.
  • AlexandraFindsHerself1971AlexandraFindsHerself1971 Posts: 479Member Member Posts: 479Member Member
    I'm just really amazed and proud of myself that in this really stressful time of my life that I'm managing to budget my eating in a way that's good for me. I know that it's only easy because of all the other work that I've done over the years, and all the support I have. Which, today, includes, no one gave me a big bag of candy...because I'm now in a family where we recognize that love is best shown by helping me keep to my diet.
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