Baked goods

24

Replies

  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,270 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    Lillymoo01 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    Lillymoo01 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    Why do you think you can't you have burgers (or anything else) while losing weight?

    Maybe fitting a burger and a donut would be difficult to manage and stay within calories if it were on the same day. Having a burger one day and a donut on another .... now that is doable. Besides nothing like a homemade burger with a salad on the side.

    Not at all difficult for me, not that I actually like donuts though. And of course the size of the burgers and donuts or baked goods (or whatever) makes a big difference to whether it would be difficult for the OP.

    But I'd really like an answer from the OP as the question is a very odd one and probably indicative of a much bigger knowledge or mindset issue than simply baked goods or burgers.

    @sijomial are you subtly bragging about your calorie allowance again?
    @Lillymoo01

    Just a little nudge against the dieting culture of eating tiny amounts of "diet foods" to lose weight.
    Yes some people do need a small calorie allowance. But too many people unthinkingly choose that option when it's inappropriate and make the process harder and less likely to be successful long term.
    Pick lowest activity level, fastest rate of loss, don't take exercise into account.....

    Also moderation of portion sizes is an option instead of exclusion which might be of help to the OP.
    From the database (I haven't checked the accuracy):
    A burger on it's own 221cals and a mini donut (both Sainsburys) 51cals which should be easy for anyone to fit into their day.

    Agree with all the above. To be honest though most people get minimal if any exercise so for many taking exercise calories into account is a non-starter.

    https://time.com/5324940/americans-exercise-physical-activity-guidelines/

    Federal physical activity guidelines recommend that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week, in addition to muscle-strengthening activities at least twice a week. But according to the new NCHS report, which drew on five years of data from the National Health Interview Survey, only about 23% of adults ages 18 to 64 are hitting both of those marks. Another 32% met one but not both, and almost 45% did not hit either benchmark.
  • Lillymoo01
    Lillymoo01 Posts: 2,868 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    Lillymoo01 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    Lillymoo01 wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    Why do you think you can't you have burgers (or anything else) while losing weight?

    Maybe fitting a burger and a donut would be difficult to manage and stay within calories if it were on the same day. Having a burger one day and a donut on another .... now that is doable. Besides nothing like a homemade burger with a salad on the side.

    Not at all difficult for me, not that I actually like donuts though. And of course the size of the burgers and donuts or baked goods (or whatever) makes a big difference to whether it would be difficult for the OP.

    But I'd really like an answer from the OP as the question is a very odd one and probably indicative of a much bigger knowledge or mindset issue than simply baked goods or burgers.

    @sijomial are you subtly bragging about your calorie allowance again?
    @Lillymoo01

    Just a little nudge against the dieting culture of eating tiny amounts of "diet foods" to lose weight.
    Yes some people do need a small calorie allowance. But too many people unthinkingly choose that option when it's inappropriate and make the process harder and less likely to be successful long term.
    Pick lowest activity level, fastest rate of loss, don't take exercise into account.....

    Also moderation of portion sizes is an option instead of exclusion which might be of help to the OP.
    From the database (I haven't checked the accuracy):
    A burger on it's own 221cals and a mini donut (both Sainsburys) 51cals which should be easy for anyone to fit into their day.

    So much truth in this. As I am not even 5 foot I would only be able to eat 1200 calories is I were sedentary to lose weight and not a huge amount more to maintain. Thank God for those exercise calories which gives me a much more sustainable calorie amount as I could imagine eating so little. I struggle to grasp how others who are much larger survive on such a piddly amount and the fact that they try is the main reason for failure.
  • Strudders67
    Strudders67 Posts: 959 Member
    [/quote] So much truth in this. As I am not even 5 foot I would only be able to eat 1200 calories is I were sedentary to lose weight and not a huge amount more to maintain. Thank God for those exercise calories which gives me a much more sustainable calorie amount as I could imagine eating so little. I struggle to grasp how others who are much larger survive on such a piddly amount and the fact that they try is the main reason for failure.[/quote]

    Same here. I'm a little bit taller but my maintenance calories are 1340. Whilst it's do-able, my exercise calories make meals enjoyable.

    And thanks @sijomial for the reminder that mini donuts are only 51cals. No Sainsbury's near here but I'll be right next door to a Tesco and an M&S when I go back to the office tomorrow. Unfortunately, you can't just buy one!
  • callsitlikeiseeit
    callsitlikeiseeit Posts: 8,633 Member
    I eat baked goods and burgers..

    I eat whatever I want as long as I can make it fit in my calories for the day
  • SeanD2407
    SeanD2407 Posts: 139 Member
    Yes it's okay.
  • standout00
    standout00 Posts: 106 Member
    SeanD2407 wrote: »
    Yes it's okay.

    Thanks for your answer!
  • GummiMundi
    GummiMundi Posts: 396 Member
    Jruzer wrote: »
    Maybe just don't have this:

    ayna5lsqji7i.jpg

    Am I weird for wanting to give this a try? :D I kid you not, it looks like it could be an interesting mix of flavours.
  • whoami67
    whoami67 Posts: 289 Member
    I am absolutely flummoxed trying to figure out how baked goods and burgers relate.

    I'd probably prefer to have the burger for a main course then the baked good for dessert.

    But I guess you could eat only the dessert or only the main course or eat dessert first.

    I don't think that donut burger looks very good, but I have always maintained that Krispy Kreme donuts are nothing but hamburger buns with glaze on them and thus I've never understood their popularity, so maybe the donut burger does make sense.
  • glassyo
    glassyo Posts: 6,446 Member
    whoami67 wrote: »
    I am absolutely flummoxed trying to figure out how baked goods and burgers relate.

    I'd probably prefer to have the burger for a main course then the baked good for dessert.

    But I guess you could eat only the dessert or only the main course or eat dessert first.

    I don't think that donut burger looks very good, but I have always maintained that Krispy Kreme donuts are nothing but hamburger buns with glaze on them and thus I've never understood their popularity, so maybe the donut burger does make sense.

    LOL you totally played yourself there. :pensive:

    I like hamburgers and I like donuts but that just doesn't appeal to me at all.

    I actually really just want an In n Burger right now. (Yes, I will go against my beliefs for that stupid burger!)
  • OAS5
    OAS5 Posts: 374 Member
    Jruzer wrote: »
    Maybe just don't have this:

    ayna5lsqji7i.jpg

    My God what are the calories and macros on that! :|
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,622 Member
    By "baked goods" do we mean baked pastry things like donuts???

    Baked goods to me would be anything baked - including things like, say cauliflower bake or frittata- but then question makes even less sense so I think there is some 'cross country lost in translation' going on??

    anyway as others have said, from a weight loss point of view you can eat any combination of foods, as long as it fits into your calorie allowance (of course from a nutrition point of view you probably don't want to live on solely burgers and donuts - I'm sure nobody is suggesting that but just getting my disclaimer in early ;) )

    Me personally_ I never eat burgers.
    Not because they hinder weight loss or anything but just because I don't really like them and I find them hard to bite into without making big mess

    Donuts on the other hand and various other 'baked goods' - my diary is embarrassingly in abundance of such things. :o
  • Lillymoo01
    Lillymoo01 Posts: 2,868 Member
    By "baked goods" do we mean baked pastry things like donuts???

    Baked goods to me would be anything baked - including things like, say cauliflower bake or frittata- but then question makes even less sense so I think there is some 'cross country lost in translation' going on??

    anyway as others have said, from a weight loss point of view you can eat any combination of foods, as long as it fits into your calorie allowance (of course from a nutrition point of view you probably don't want to live on solely burgers and donuts - I'm sure nobody is suggesting that but just getting my disclaimer in early ;) )

    Me personally_ I never eat burgers.
    Not because they hinder weight loss or anything but just because I don't really like them and I find them hard to bite into without making big mess

    Donuts on the other hand and various other 'baked goods' - my diary is embarrassingly in abundance of such things. :o

    You actually had me perplexed and looking for a definition with that one! According to Merriam-Webster....

    baked good noun

    Definition of baked good
    : a food (such as a bread, cake, or cookie) made from a dough or batter that is baked —usually plural
  • AlexandraFindsHerself1971
    AlexandraFindsHerself1971 Posts: 2,893 Member
    I eat burgers and chips for lunch a couple times a week. I eat a homemade English muffin with real butter and homemade jam for breakfast every morning. Sometimes I have chocolate chip cookies or snickerdoodles. (Though right now I am on a Rice Krispies Bar kick.) Sometimes I have a piece of German chocolate.

    Of course, I also eat beef marsala and fettucini alfredo and crab cakes and lamb curry with basmati rice, and tacos al pastor, and there is homemade garlic bread and rolls and naan.

    I'm down forty pounds, and four sizes, so I'm doing something that my body likes.

  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,430 Member
    By "baked goods" do we mean baked pastry things like donuts???

    Baked goods to me would be anything baked - including things like, say cauliflower bake or frittata- but then question makes even less sense so I think there is some 'cross country lost in translation' going on??

    anyway as others have said, from a weight loss point of view you can eat any combination of foods, as long as it fits into your calorie allowance (of course from a nutrition point of view you probably don't want to live on solely burgers and donuts - I'm sure nobody is suggesting that but just getting my disclaimer in early ;) )

    Me personally_ I never eat burgers.
    Not because they hinder weight loss or anything but just because I don't really like them and I find them hard to bite into without making big mess

    Donuts on the other hand and various other 'baked goods' - my diary is embarrassingly in abundance of such things. :o

    I would only include things made from grain flours or close substitutes (e.g., nut meals, buckwheat flour) to be baked goods, just because that's the way I've always heard the term used. Not anything that happens to be cooked in an oven (like a casserole or a roast turkey).
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,834 Member
    By "baked goods" do we mean baked pastry things like donuts???

    Baked goods to me would be anything baked - including things like, say cauliflower bake or frittata- but then question makes even less sense so I think there is some 'cross country lost in translation' going on??

    (snip)

    Probably. I think you're not USAian? "Baked goods" is standard murcan category name for cookies/cakes/breads kind of stuff, as per dictionary definition from Lillymoo.

    You think pudding is something different from what I think it is, mostly, too, I'd bet. ;)
  • Hanibanani2020
    Hanibanani2020 Posts: 523 Member
    So yesterday I had a piece of cake and a veggie burger and was far from reaching my total calorie intake. Today is weigh day And I’m a kg down so you can definitely eat both and lose. 😊
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,622 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    By "baked goods" do we mean baked pastry things like donuts???

    Baked goods to me would be anything baked - including things like, say cauliflower bake or frittata- but then question makes even less sense so I think there is some 'cross country lost in translation' going on??

    (snip)

    Probably. I think you're not USAian? "Baked goods" is standard murcan category name for cookies/cakes/breads kind of stuff, as per dictionary definition from Lillymoo.

    You think pudding is something different from what I think it is, mostly, too, I'd bet. ;)


    Correct - I am in Australia. I wondered if it was a cross country different meaning thing.

    Do you not have potato bake? Would you not call that baked goods even though it's very name includes ' bake'?
    But it has no flour.

    Interesting.

    Re pudding - I would only call that the sort of thing in my avatar photo - a warm cakey thing, often served with chocolate sauce or custard
    But I do know some english people call any dessert eaten after a meal 'pudding'
    Ie we are having fruit salad for pudding.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,834 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    By "baked goods" do we mean baked pastry things like donuts???

    Baked goods to me would be anything baked - including things like, say cauliflower bake or frittata- but then question makes even less sense so I think there is some 'cross country lost in translation' going on??

    (snip)

    Probably. I think you're not USAian? "Baked goods" is standard murcan category name for cookies/cakes/breads kind of stuff, as per dictionary definition from Lillymoo.

    You think pudding is something different from what I think it is, mostly, too, I'd bet. ;)


    Correct - I am in Australia. I wondered if it was a cross country different meaning thing.

    Do you not have potato bake? Would you not call that baked goods even though it's very name includes ' bake'?
    But it has no flour.

    Interesting.

    Re pudding - I would only call that the sort of thing in my avatar photo - a warm cakey thing, often served with chocolate sauce or custard
    But I do know some english people call any dessert eaten after a meal 'pudding'
    Ie we are having fruit salad for pudding.

    I don't know whether we have what you call potato bake, but we don't call anything potato bake, at least in my part of the country. What is potato bake? Is it like sliced potatos with milk/bechamel, baked? If so, that's scalloped pottaoes.

    Most things that are an assortment of savory ingredients mixed together and put in the over to bake, to make a main dish, would be called a casserole here, but I think over west of here a bit on the other side of Lake Michigan, they might call it hot dish.

    Scalloped potatoes isn't really a casserole, though I can't say exactly why, because it'd still be scalloped potatoes even with something like ham in it. If someone said "casserole" the classic thought would be tuna noodle casserole, probably, with tuna, flat egg noodles, veggies, maybe a can of soup concentrate (or bechamel or the like), maybe crumb/crouton or crumbled potato chip crust.

    I assumed you'd call the thing in your photo a pudding, too, which is why I mentioned it. The main thing called pudding here is a goopy sweet-ish thing made usually with milk and cornstarch and a flavoring (chocolate, vanilla, butterscotch, fruity, . . . ) , sort of a custardy thing but not always with eggs in it, and normally cooked stovetop rather than baked. (Well, actually, usually an instant made from powder these days, or bought made up.) We do call certain things that are cake-like batter but steamed "pudding", but not all of them (for example, Boston Brown Bread is steamed, and vaguely like that, but not called a pudding. We don't do a lot of the steamed batter puddings here, at least in my subculture(s).) But there'd also be rice pudding and tapioca pudding, which is goopy stuff with the named ingredients in it.

    Where I am, "baked goods" are what the dictionary definition earlier said, just cakes, cookies, muffins, cakes, and that sort of thing. They're mostly sweet things. I think people wouldn't freak out if someone included non-sweet bread or rolls as "baked goods", but if someone uses the term, I think mostly of the sweet things.
  • Hanibanani2020
    Hanibanani2020 Posts: 523 Member
    Pudding in America is basically yogo here.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,622 Member
    My avatar is what people here would call,Christmas pudding - has dried fruit in it and usually served with warm custrad.

    You can also get chocolate or other flavour puddings.

    I have not heard of yogo.

    Potato bake: https://theorganisedhousewife.com.au/recipes/no-fail-creamy-potato-bake-recipe/

    Variations on recipe and can be done without bacon pieces - but link shows typical potato bake.