Baked goods

13

Replies

  • Lillymoo01
    Lillymoo01 Posts: 2,868 Member
    The weird thing is that as a fellow Aussie I am well aware of baked potato and tuna bake yet when someone says baked goods I immediately think of things with flour and not this other stuff.
  • Hanibanani2020
    Hanibanani2020 Posts: 523 Member
    Lillymoo01 wrote: »
    The weird thing is that as a fellow Aussie I am well aware of baked potato and tuna bake yet when someone says baked goods I immediately think of things with flour and not this other stuff.

    Me too! People say baked goods and I think of croissants and muffins etc
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,598 Member
    I am in South Australia, I never really hear the term baked goods at all..

    Maybe it is a state difference thing as well as a country difference thing.

    Or maybe it is just me.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,759 Member
    My avatar is what people here would call,Christmas pudding - has dried fruit in it and usually served with warm custrad.

    You can also get chocolate or other flavour puddings.

    I have not heard of yogo.

    Potato bake: https://theorganisedhousewife.com.au/recipes/no-fail-creamy-potato-bake-recipe/

    Variations on recipe and can be done without bacon pieces - but link shows typical potato bake.

    While many people wouldn't add cheese, that's basically what I'd call scalloped potatoes, in a fancied-up version. I don't know why I wouldn't call it potato casserole. Since someone else mentioned tuna bake, I'm betting you'd mostly say "bake" where I'd say "casserole" (and I think folks over in Minnesota might say "hot dish", but they can speak for themselves).

    That would never, ever be called "baked goods" here, even though you bake it.

    I looked up the ingredients for yogo, and it looks like it could be similar to our pudding, but it's not the same. Basic pudding has no yogurt. It's a very old, traditional thing. If I were to make a basic pudding from scratch , I'd put milk, cornstarch, sugar, a pinch of salt and a flavoring (cocoa, say) on the stove (probably in a double boiler) and stir it until it got thick. It's usually eaten cooled, used in cream pies, put in cream puffs, or that sort of thing. Like this: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/44699/chocolate-cornstarch-pudding/ (I'd call the butter in there nice, but optional.)

    There's a lot of regional variation in the US about what things are conventionally called, how they're served, what foods are served routinely, and more.

    As an aside, I'm speaking here entirely about my experiential understanding of local language usage. Dictionary definitions are swell, but they tend to be broadened and averaged (kind of de-regionalized). That's needful, but not really the trajectory of this sub-thread IMO.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,759 Member
    Afterthought: I suspect many people would accept donuts being called "baked goods", even though they're not necessarily baked.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,598 Member
    edited June 2020
    I'm not sure what I would call your version of pudding although I know the sort of thing you mean, that is used as a filling in some pastries.
    maybe Cream filling?

    Was thinking about this overnight (yes yes get a life... :* ) and I would say what you are calling baked goods I would call pastries - and then just to test if this is just me or a more widely known thing I googled it - and The word "pastries" suggests many kinds of baked products made from ingredients such as flour, sugar, milk, butter, shortening, baking powder, and eggs. Small tarts and other sweet baked products are called pastries. Common pastry dishes include pies, tarts, quiches, croissants, and pasties.

    followed by umpteen ads for bakeries selling pastries and recipes for various pastries - all of which were types of the italiced - or what you and OP are referring to as baked goods.

    Yes the word casserole is used here too - meaning something cooked in the oven or in a slow cooker in an everything mixed together way and you can buy casserole dishes - meaning the crockery dish to cook a casserole in the oven with.
    I guess some words are interchangable - although potato bake, in my experience isnt ever referred to as anything else. (and aussies, in my experience, love potato bake - is a very popular side dish for BBQ's, at buffets etc)

    Whereas tuna bake, as mentioned by aussie poster upthread - I think that could equally be referred to as tuna bake or tuna casserole. likewise other things like chicken bake/chicken casserole
    but beef - beef bake sounds wrong and would only be beef casserole although chicken bake/ chicken casserole could be referred to as either.
    No idea why


    ETA just to pretend I am still trying to inform OP - yes you can eat any combination of the above and lose weight - as long as within your calorie allowance.
  • glassyo
    glassyo Posts: 6,428 Member
    I REALLY want scalloped potatoes now. :)
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,759 Member
    I'm not sure what I would call your version of pudding although I know the sort of thing you mean, that is used as a filling in some pastries.
    maybe Cream filling?

    Was thinking about this overnight (yes yes get a life... :* ) and I would say what you are calling baked goods I would call pastries - and then just to test if this is just me or a more widely known thing I googled it - and The word "pastries" suggests many kinds of baked products made from ingredients such as flour, sugar, milk, butter, shortening, baking powder, and eggs. Small tarts and other sweet baked products are called pastries. Common pastry dishes include pies, tarts, quiches, croissants, and pasties.

    followed by umpteen ads for bakeries selling pastries and recipes for various pastries - all of which were types of the italiced - or what you and OP are referring to as baked goods.

    Yes the word casserole is used here too - meaning something cooked in the oven or in a slow cooker in an everything mixed together way and you can buy casserole dishes - meaning the crockery dish to cook a casserole in the oven with.
    I guess some words are interchangable - although potato bake, in my experience isnt ever referred to as anything else. (and aussies, in my experience, love potato bake - is a very popular side dish for BBQ's, at buffets etc)

    Whereas tuna bake, as mentioned by aussie poster upthread - I think that could equally be referred to as tuna bake or tuna casserole. likewise other things like chicken bake/chicken casserole
    but beef - beef bake sounds wrong and would only be beef casserole although chicken bake/ chicken casserole could be referred to as either.
    No idea why


    ETA just to pretend I am still trying to inform OP - yes you can eat any combination of the above and lose weight - as long as within your calorie allowance.

    To me, pastries (compared to baked goods) are "short", i.e., heavy on the butter or other fats. So, yeah, quiche crust, croissants, and that sort of thing. Baked good can be rich like that, or not so much. I'd consider muffins baked goods, but not pastries. Ditto cookies, cakes. Not pastries. Pies, tarts - yes.

    Language is weird.

    We use pudding as a filling, yes, but also just eat it from a dish (often stemmed, for some reason, I guess just to be fancy), and sometimes with whipped cream or that execrable non-food, Cool Whip, on top.

    Scalloped potatoes are a popular side dish here, too, for buffets and such. Those, or cheesy potatoes, which are kind of the same, but cheesier, and might be shredded (hash brown raw material type) versus slices.

    Now I want potatoes. Which - to the OP - are also perfectly fine to eat within calorie goal, too, whether cheesy or not, called "bake" or "scalloped", with or without bacon/ham, etc. :lol:
  • harper16
    harper16 Posts: 2,564 Member
    edited June 2020
    glassyo wrote: »
    I REALLY want scalloped potatoes now. :)

    With all the pudding talk I'm thinking of making Yorkshire pudding, and a roast.
  • Hanibanani2020
    Hanibanani2020 Posts: 523 Member
    I love that this thread has turned into a deep discussion on regional ‘baked goods’ terminology
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,598 Member


    oh yes very deep and meaningful B)
    We use pudding as a filling, yes, but also just eat it from a dish (often stemmed, for some reason, I guess just to be fancy), and sometimes with whipped cream or that execrable non-food, Cool Whip, on top.

    so basically - custard?

    which people sometimes eat on its own or with things like stewed fruit or on top of what I call puddings (ie as in my avatar) and is sometimes used as a pastry filling - ie a custard tart.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,759 Member

    oh yes very deep and meaningful B)
    We use pudding as a filling, yes, but also just eat it from a dish (often stemmed, for some reason, I guess just to be fancy), and sometimes with whipped cream or that execrable non-food, Cool Whip, on top.

    so basically - custard?

    which people sometimes eat on its own or with things like stewed fruit or on top of what I call puddings (ie as in my avatar) and is sometimes used as a pastry filling - ie a custard tart.

    No. Custard is eggy. Pudding is not eggy.
  • Hanibanani2020
    Hanibanani2020 Posts: 523 Member
    I lived in the states for ages and chocolate pudding and yogo taste exactly the same imho.
  • harper16
    harper16 Posts: 2,564 Member
    I lived in the states for ages and chocolate pudding and yogo taste exactly the same imho.

    What is yogo?
  • Hanibanani2020
    Hanibanani2020 Posts: 523 Member
    harper16 wrote: »
    I lived in the states for ages and chocolate pudding and yogo taste exactly the same imho.

    What is yogo?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/YoGo
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,759 Member
    I lived in the states for ages and chocolate pudding and yogo taste exactly the same imho.

    Perhaps. But even chocolate pudding doesn't taste exactly the same.

    (Some gets made on my stovetop and tastes rich and good. Some comes as powder in a box and . . . doesn't. Some comes premade from the grocery store, and is - I think - brown exterior latex paint that got too thick to paint with, so they added a metric ton of sugar per gallon, then put it in pudding cups.)
  • Hanibanani2020
    Hanibanani2020 Posts: 523 Member
    All chocolate is gross so i may not be the best judge 😂
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,425 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    By "baked goods" do we mean baked pastry things like donuts???

    Baked goods to me would be anything baked - including things like, say cauliflower bake or frittata- but then question makes even less sense so I think there is some 'cross country lost in translation' going on??

    (snip)

    Probably. I think you're not USAian? "Baked goods" is standard murcan category name for cookies/cakes/breads kind of stuff, as per dictionary definition from Lillymoo.

    You think pudding is something different from what I think it is, mostly, too, I'd bet. ;)


    Correct - I am in Australia. I wondered if it was a cross country different meaning thing.

    Do you not have potato bake? Would you not call that baked goods even though it's very name includes ' bake'?
    But it has no flour.

    Interesting.

    Re pudding - I would only call that the sort of thing in my avatar photo - a warm cakey thing, often served with chocolate sauce or custard
    But I do know some english people call any dessert eaten after a meal 'pudding'
    Ie we are having fruit salad for pudding.

    I don't know whether we have what you call potato bake, but we don't call anything potato bake, at least in my part of the country. What is potato bake? Is it like sliced potatos with milk/bechamel, baked? If so, that's scalloped pottaoes.

    Most things that are an assortment of savory ingredients mixed together and put in the over to bake, to make a main dish, would be called a casserole here, but I think over west of here a bit on the other side of Lake Michigan, they might call it hot dish.

    Scalloped potatoes isn't really a casserole, though I can't say exactly why, because it'd still be scalloped potatoes even with something like ham in it. If someone said "casserole" the classic thought would be tuna noodle casserole, probably, with tuna, flat egg noodles, veggies, maybe a can of soup concentrate (or bechamel or the like), maybe crumb/crouton or crumbled potato chip crust.

    I assumed you'd call the thing in your photo a pudding, too, which is why I mentioned it. The main thing called pudding here is a goopy sweet-ish thing made usually with milk and cornstarch and a flavoring (chocolate, vanilla, butterscotch, fruity, . . . ) , sort of a custardy thing but not always with eggs in it, and normally cooked stovetop rather than baked. (Well, actually, usually an instant made from powder these days, or bought made up.) We do call certain things that are cake-like batter but steamed "pudding", but not all of them (for example, Boston Brown Bread is steamed, and vaguely like that, but not called a pudding. We don't do a lot of the steamed batter puddings here, at least in my subculture(s).) But there'd also be rice pudding and tapioca pudding, which is goopy stuff with the named ingredients in it.

    Where I am, "baked goods" are what the dictionary definition earlier said, just cakes, cookies, muffins, cakes, and that sort of thing. They're mostly sweet things. I think people wouldn't freak out if someone included non-sweet bread or rolls as "baked goods", but if someone uses the term, I think mostly of the sweet things.

    Hmm. I would consider scalloped potatoes a casserole. I also wouldn't limit casseroles to main dishes. What about the famous holiday green bean casserole?

    I think there's a lot of not terribly logical distinctions on what is considered a casserole. I wouldn't call baked lasagna a casserole, but a similarly structured layered dish made with tortillas instead of lasagne noodles, Mexican spices instead of Italian, Rotel tomatoes instead of tomato sauce, and cheddar-jack blend instead of mozzarella and ricotta? Yeah, I'd call that a casserole.

    I don't call baked macaroni and cheese a casserole, but I think it is a casserole. If I were asked to bring a casserole to a pot luck, I would think I was fulfilling my assignment if I brought homemade baked macaroni and cheese.

    Many years ago, I tried to explain to a roommate who was from China what a casserole was. I told her it was a large category of savory dishes that were baked in the oven in a casserole dish (yes, I know, circular definition), and that usually include some kind of sauce element, such as a white sauce or a cheese sauce or canned soup.

    It occurs to me that a lot of recipes I have where "casserole" is actually part of the name of the dish are recipes developed by food manufacturers to get you to buy more of their products and printed in magazine ads or on packaging -- "hey, here's this great easy dish that you will need our pasta/cheese/canned soup/canned fried onions, etc. to make."
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,425 Member
    Pudding in America is basically yogo here.

    The texture may be the same, but pudding in the U.S. (can't speak for all the Americas) does not have yogurt in it.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,425 Member
    My avatar is what people here would call,Christmas pudding - has dried fruit in it and usually served with warm custrad.

    You can also get chocolate or other flavour puddings.

    I have not heard of yogo.

    Potato bake: https://theorganisedhousewife.com.au/recipes/no-fail-creamy-potato-bake-recipe/

    Variations on recipe and can be done without bacon pieces - but link shows typical potato bake.

    With the cheese, that's similar to what I grew up calling potatoes au gratin, but if somebody served that and called it scalloped potatoes (which in my house didn't have cheese), I wouldn't have thought it was weird or anything. We sometimes put diced ham in either scalloped potatoes or the gratin, rather than bacon. I don't recollect seeing a recipe for either with sour cream, but I wholeheartedly approve. :smile: