First week of high cholesterol diet and I'm depressed... Seeking advice

2

Replies

  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 3,881 Member
    edited November 2020
    Willpower takes effort and self control. Doctor isn't "making" you adopt this diet but what's the harm in trying? Does not having a cheat meal terrify you?
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 3,881 Member
    Edited to say that I see it's not genetic. I'd probably at least try her advice, as hard as it may be, for four weeks and see if the numbers go down.
  • sbrno1985
    sbrno1985 Posts: 10 Member
    edited November 2020
    psuLemon wrote: »
    sbrno1985 wrote: »
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    Your medical doctor has a side Amway business?

    On the basis of the above datum I would seek a second confirmatory opinion as to the treatment they recommended while also seeking to verify their credentials.

    Yep. I had no idea. I found that out during our appointment. She showed me her $46 plant based protein powder (2 scoops = 10g) and said i should take 1 scoop per day. I showed my whey protein from Myprotein, she said its no good because its 1g saturated fat :disappointed:

    Not for nothing but I've read that plant protein powder tastes like crap. If the whey is no good then couldnt i just switch to whey isolate instead? That has no sat fat at all in it.

    Other than that, do you think the rest of her meal plan is a quack? The major red flags i see are the lack of protein for breakfast and lunch, the weird snack choice, and the restriction from things like fruits, greek yogurt, and low fat cheese.

    I would definitely go to another doctor. And 1g of sat fats are fine. The larger concern is fried and processed foods are they lack nutrients. I would look into the Mediterranean Diet. Focusing on lean meats, eggs, whole grains/oats, fruits and veggies (especially avocado), fish, seeds and nuts, and limiting processed foods and you will be in a good position.

    Also, how did they determine that you had plague build up? That LDL isn't that high. Do you know how your triglycerides and fasting glucose look?

    And no doctor should be pedaling products. They drives a conflict of interest and may not be best for your health.

    Yes im just starting to research Mediterranean. Sounds way more doable. Having a cheat meal once a week or every 2 weeks could help too.

    Not sure about triglycerides she didnt mention. But i know my glucose is within normal range so thats no issue. Good question about the plaque. What she did was place her stethoscope on my carotid, asked me to take a deep breath and hold it for a brief period, and she said she could hear a little bit of the carotid "bruit".

    Other than that, we also did EKGs, echocardiogram, stress test, and pulmonary test. All turned out normal.
  • corinasue1143
    corinasue1143 Posts: 6,369 Member
    Also, exercise may raise your Hdl. If you stopped exercising ‘cause of corona, that could be part of it. Starting to exercise again could help.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    sbrno1985 wrote: »
    What exactly do you mean by "lacking any protein source"? Not even plant proteins?
    Protein is an important nutrient, so I don't understand how a doctor would recommend a diet where most meals lack protein.

    So it goes like this. Her meal plan has 5 food groups.

    Group 1 is fiber/healthy carbs...whole wheat toast (x2), multigrain bread, 5 oz whole wheat pasta, 1 boiled potato, 2 oz oatmeal, 5 oz corn, or 5 oz cooked legumes.

    Group 2 is fruits. Group 3 is low fat/fat free yogurt, ricotta or cottage. Group 4 are whole protein sources like eggs, skinless chicken, etc. Group 5 is veggies.

    For me she crossed out groups 2 and 3 completely.

    BREAKFAST: 1 item from group 1, multivitamin

    LUNCH: 1 item each from groups 1 and 5, multi vitamin, omega 3 plus.

    DINNER: 1 item each from groups 1, 4, and 5. Omega 3 plus.

    SNACK: 2 calcium magnesium tabs.

    She also told me to have 1 protein smoothie a day with plant powder not whey. And she wanted me to buy her own expensive powder from her Amway business.

    Just to clarify, groups 1 and 5 do have protein-containing foods. There is protein in foods like bread, pasta, corn, legumes, and vegetables. Not all of these are high protein foods and I think this diet sounds really sketchy, but you can get protein from plants too.
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,090 Member
    @sbrno1985 Also curious is this is a general practitioner/PCP making these recommendations or if it is another style doctor such as a chiropractor like asked above. I cannot imagine an MD making such recommendations or selling protein powders at their office. Sounds sketchy to me. I agree with @Mithridites that addressing your stress sounds more important IMO. When I was in my 40's I went to ER over "heart" issues. Turns out I was just crazy stressed, nothing else wrong.
  • Ddsb11
    Ddsb11 Posts: 607 Member
    sbrno1985 wrote: »
    W... She didn't give me a calorie limit just a menu with choices and certain guidelines like aim for fat free or no saturated fats ...

    ...indicating her knowledge of nutritional needs and the latest science on the matter are sorely lacking.

    1. You can be overweight, underweight or a normal weight eating whatever is on her list. The important thing is not what you eat but how much. Also, just because something is on or off her list does not mean its magically good or bad food.
    2. The suspected link between dietary fat and serum cholesterol was greatly over hyped. More recent science indicates there is little link for most people. Only those who are genetically predisposed to have their serum cholesterol greatly affected by dietary cholesterol need to extremely limit dietary fats and those folks are only identified through trial and error research.
    3. Fat is an important part of our daily diet and is necessary for proper maintenance of cells in our bodies. Poly- and mono-unsaturated fats are considered to be good fats to consume but we need some saturated fats as well. Current recommendations are to limit but not eliminate saturated fats in the diet. The only fats you should avoid are transfats which are artificially created through hydrogenation.

    To learn more about nutrition -- easily more than your PCP knows -- go to https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/ Start with the "What should I eat?" and go from there. For specific information about dietary fats, look at https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/fats-and-cholesterol/ and https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2012/06/21/ask-the-expert-healthy-fats/

    You’re my spirit animal 👏🏻
  • wilsonunc
    wilsonunc Posts: 45 Member
    As a future medical provider, her comments and recommendations to you blow my mind and I would recommend you find a new provider who is going to have your best interests at heart.
  • ahoy_m8
    ahoy_m8 Posts: 2,832 Member
    30 years ago when I first moved to town I went to a MD who was my parents’ neighbor. I weighed at low end normal BMI at the time. He sent me direct marketing for weight loss shakes. I didn’t go back, but yeah, it happens.
  • Bluetail6
    Bluetail6 Posts: 2,727 Member
    sbrno1985 wrote: »
    W... She didn't give me a calorie limit just a menu with choices and certain guidelines like aim for fat free or no saturated fats ...

    ...indicating her knowledge of nutritional needs and the latest science on the matter are sorely lacking.

    1. You can be overweight, underweight or a normal weight eating whatever is on her list. The important thing is not what you eat but how much. Also, just because something is on or off her list does not mean its magically good or bad food.
    2. The suspected link between dietary fat and serum cholesterol was greatly over hyped. More recent science indicates there is little link for most people. Only those who are genetically predisposed to have their serum cholesterol greatly affected by dietary cholesterol need to extremely limit dietary fats and those folks are only identified through trial and error research.
    3. Fat is an important part of our daily diet and is necessary for proper maintenance of cells in our bodies. Poly- and mono-unsaturated fats are considered to be good fats to consume but we need some saturated fats as well. Current recommendations are to limit but not eliminate saturated fats in the diet. The only fats you should avoid are transfats which are artificially created through hydrogenation.

    To learn more about nutrition -- easily more than your PCP knows -- go to https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/ Start with the "What should I eat?" and go from there. For specific information about dietary fats, look at https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/fats-and-cholesterol/ and https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2012/06/21/ask-the-expert-healthy-fats/

    I always inspired when I read your posts. I love the Harvard and Mayo Clinic Sites. Also, I sincerely appreciate that you cite your information sources.
  • Rhumax67
    Rhumax67 Posts: 196 Member
    This has red flags all over it. First of all shortness of breath is not something to ignore. As far as the diet, 1/2 cup of beans will get you 5 g of protein - what's the point of the protein powder? except to enrich the seller?

    I'm with Malted Tea - get a second opinion from someone with the initials MD after their name