What fuels your fire?

Most of us have pretty similar goals, but the motivations behind those goals can be really diverse. What drives you to have a healthier more fit lifestyle?
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Replies

  • strebor337
    strebor337 Posts: 168 Member
    I’m a competitive power lifter, so I’m always trying to lift heavier weights. So my daily goals are the things that will help me do that.

    That's cool! What do you love about power lifting?
  • strebor337
    strebor337 Posts: 168 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I'm 65, live alone, no spouse, siblings, children. Future Ann needs me to have at least baseline health and strength, or her life will be more unhappy/unpleasant.

    I want to avoid a permanent move to an assisted living facility for as long as possible. I like being independent. I don't like living in close proximity to other people. I dislike social situations where everyone is around my age (vs. diverse). I'll probably have to stop being vegetarian (which I've been since 1974) in assisted living in order to get minimally adequate nutrition. None of that sounds good.

    Also, it's more fun now to be strong and healthy. I wish I'd lost weight decades ago, especially when I figured out how straightforward it is, now that we have calorie-counting apps. (I've been active and reasonably fit for nearing two decades now, including well over a decade while obese, which is why I'm highlighting the weight aspect - both parts are important).

    That's awesome Ann! An amazing commitment to maintain a vegetarian lifestyle for so many years. I hope I can be as active and free when I'm 65. Good fitness really makes whatever time we have so much more enjoyable. I'm finding that the calorie counter makes a huge difference for me. I thought I had a good idea of what I was eating, but without recording it I'm just shooting in the dark.
  • strebor337
    strebor337 Posts: 168 Member
    MaltedTea wrote: »
    Cufflinks. Wait...wrong thread again.

    In that case, feeling powerful and energized throughout the day.

    I suppose you could be motivated by cufflinks. It's the little things that count.
  • MaltedTea
    MaltedTea Posts: 6,287 Member
    strebor337 wrote: »
    MaltedTea wrote: »
    Cufflinks. Wait...wrong thread again.

    In that case, feeling powerful and energized throughout the day.

    I suppose you could be motivated by cufflinks. It's the little things that count.

    You get me 😌
  • strebor337
    strebor337 Posts: 168 Member
    My kids need a healthy, strong, happy mom.

    Their mom feels depressed, horrible, dejected when she is not working out, or eating half decently.

    I also want to set a good example for them (and their friends). Show them that it's ok to be strong and have muscles if that's what you want. That there are perks to not needing to call someone stronger for help. That if they want to be in the gym and take up space, they can.

    And I get a rush out of hearing them brag about mom lifting. Haha

    Plus, finally. I love having visible muscles. I love the look and aesthetic. I feel amazing when I feel like I look amazing.

    It's interesting that you mention taking up space in the gym. I've been taking a course on nonverbal communication and they talk a lot about how occupying space increases testosterone production and inhibits cortisol. Apart from the physical benefits, what a great way to enhance emotional balance!
  • strebor337
    strebor337 Posts: 168 Member
    edited January 2021
    MaltedTea wrote: »

    You get me 😌

    What can I say? I'm easily distracted by shiny objects.
  • strebor337
    strebor337 Posts: 168 Member
    harri1790 wrote: »
    Vanity mostly. I hate the way I look and I’m the heaviest person in the family and certain members of my family have and will make comments behind my back. I was also recently diagnosed with moderate to severe non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and have a gastroenterologist who is quite...firm...about me losing weight. So that’s additional motivation lol.

    That's a good starting point. I hope you can get to a point where you're motivated as much by love for yourself and internal passion rather than external pressures. Be kind to yourself and embrace the process Harri.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,208 Member
    strebor337 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I'm 65, live alone, no spouse, siblings, children. Future Ann needs me to have at least baseline health and strength, or her life will be more unhappy/unpleasant.

    I want to avoid a permanent move to an assisted living facility for as long as possible. I like being independent. I don't like living in close proximity to other people. I dislike social situations where everyone is around my age (vs. diverse). I'll probably have to stop being vegetarian (which I've been since 1974) in assisted living in order to get minimally adequate nutrition. None of that sounds good.

    Also, it's more fun now to be strong and healthy. I wish I'd lost weight decades ago, especially when I figured out how straightforward it is, now that we have calorie-counting apps. (I've been active and reasonably fit for nearing two decades now, including well over a decade while obese, which is why I'm highlighting the weight aspect - both parts are important).

    That's awesome Ann! An amazing commitment to maintain a vegetarian lifestyle for so many years. I hope I can be as active and free when I'm 65. Good fitness really makes whatever time we have so much more enjoyable. I'm finding that the calorie counter makes a huge difference for me. I thought I had a good idea of what I was eating, but without recording it I'm just shooting in the dark.

    Not commitment, not for 46+ years. I never did much like meat, and after a while, it became a habit not to eat it. (Most of it now sounds vaguely disgusting to eat myself, though it doesn't bother me if others do - I was married to a hunter for over 20 years, happily - now long widowed.)

    I'm too lazy and hedonistic to do things that take commitment. That puts a priority on my finding methods to accomplish my objectives that don't require much of annoying things like commitment, discipline, hard work, will power . . . . 😉

    Like you, I find calorie counting hugely helpful. It's like a fun science-fair experiment for grown-ups, in my world! 🙂
  • strebor337
    strebor337 Posts: 168 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »

    Not commitment, not for 46+ years. I never did much like meat, and after a while, it became a habit not to eat it. (Most of it now sounds vaguely disgusting to eat myself, though it doesn't bother me if others do - I was married to a hunter for over 20 years, happily - now long widowed.)

    I'm too lazy and hedonistic to do things that take commitment. That puts a priority on my finding methods to accomplish my objectives that don't require much of annoying things like commitment, discipline, hard work, will power . . . . 😉

    Like you, I find calorie counting hugely helpful. It's like a fun science-fair experiment for grown-ups, in my world! 🙂

    Spoken like an accountant!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,208 Member
    strebor337 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »

    Not commitment, not for 46+ years. I never did much like meat, and after a while, it became a habit not to eat it. (Most of it now sounds vaguely disgusting to eat myself, though it doesn't bother me if others do - I was married to a hunter for over 20 years, happily - now long widowed.)

    I'm too lazy and hedonistic to do things that take commitment. That puts a priority on my finding methods to accomplish my objectives that don't require much of annoying things like commitment, discipline, hard work, will power . . . . 😉

    Like you, I find calorie counting hugely helpful. It's like a fun science-fair experiment for grown-ups, in my world! 🙂

    Spoken like an accountant!

    Data geek, but not a numbers gal.
  • strebor337
    strebor337 Posts: 168 Member
    Great art Luke! The first time I went to a trainer at the gym, I told him that I was there because I wanted my wife to sigh whenever I took off my shirt. Maybe I should have told her that was the expectation.
  • JSLuke59
    JSLuke59 Posts: 65 Member
    strebor337 wrote: »
    Great art Luke! The first time I went to a trainer at the gym, I told him that I was there because I wanted my wife to sigh whenever I took off my shirt. Maybe I should have told her that was the expectation.

    Thank you. Yes, getting her in on that plan would have been helpful :)
  • IWTBF67
    IWTBF67 Posts: 68 Member
    Jesus
  • strebor337
    strebor337 Posts: 168 Member
    Always a good coach to have in your corner.