Garden thread

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  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 26,342 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I'm going to look into this too, was thinking about trying to add some native seeds.

    kshama, I recently bought this: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/emily-dickinsons-gardening-life-marta-mcdowell/1130003359, which given location you might find interesting, I expect it is at libraries. (I haven't actually read it yet.)

    Thanks! My cousin is a poet and a big Emily Dickinson fan. He teaches a class on her and does a one man play about her and her Irish servants.
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 3,996 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    LoveyChar wrote: »
    First time quarantine gardener last year who tried so hard to make everything "perfect," which resulted in failure. This year I'm going a little rogue. I dumped a bunch of potted soil containing seeds into my garden and much to my surprise up popped parsley and I have Bell Pepper seedlings growing in there. I'm not pulling anything this year, nothing, unless I know it's a weed. 2021 will be a year of spiritual and emotional growth and plant growth too, I hope!!!

    ahtlvu1q870d.jpg

    You know parsley is a hardy biennial, right? (Well, hardy to USDA zone 5, at least, and the web says 4-9.) If you never had parsley plants in that soil, obviously it's a seedling, of course. But if there were plants, it could be a returnee. In year 2, the plants look a little squirrely eventually, IME, then flower and go to seed - not that helpful for cutting.

    Apologies if this is stating the obvious.

    Thank you, no it popped up from seeds because I've never had a parsley plant in the raised garden. I appreciate your insight, truly, because the more I learn the better I do. I'll be thrilled when it gets long enough to cut!
  • Speakeasy76
    Speakeasy76 Posts: 960 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I'm using this as a chance to brag about my husband's gardening skills, of which I have known. He had always been into gardening, having grown up on a farm. He even found some land to start a garden when he lived n apartment!

    We live in a house with over 1.5 acres of land, which he specifically wanted so he could grow things. Our huge garden will have a variety of lettuce, a large variety of tomatoes, omatoes, strawberries, broccoli, cauliflower, potatoes, carrots, zucchini and yellow squash and a variety of peppers (including jalapenos). Also grows some grapes, raspberries and blackberries...but the birds usually get to those, first. Oh, we also have 2 peach trees.

    Right now, he has built an indoor garden that grows a variety of lettuce and greens (spinach and kale). Ironically, he is not a very healthy eater, but he started the indoor lettuce and greens because he was tired of me buying crap stuff from the store. He's currently experimenting with growing strawberries I doors. Like I said...I just eat and cook the stuff and get it once it's ready, but otherwise don't have much at all to do with it.

    At my last places I had enough strawberries to share with the birds, but here I fence and put bird netting over the fence. Works great!

    f3jht6nrw89e.jpg

    Thanks for sharing! He does have netting around some of the raspberries and blackberries, but the other section doesn't have them...yet. I will be honest, I don't have any problems eating any of the stuff from the garden, except I'm always nervous about raspberries. I've seen too many larvae in them (even store-bought ones!), and I will eat them because they're one of my favorites, but I'm nervous about the ones we grow.
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 9,977 Member

    It was one of those rare January days when the sun was out and it wasn't too cold. I took advantage of the afternoon, but I just about ran out of daylight.

    First order of business was tree pruning. I got the figs last weekend. I started with the Italian Prune Plum. We did a major prune on it last year, so this was a fairly light prune. I had to cut it back majorly about ten years ago. I had a three year plan so I wouldn't stress the tree too much. I am on year ten of that three year plan....

    Next I went to the back of the yard and pruned the Chojuro (Asian pear) and the Bartlett. I was a little more intensive with them than usual. Every summer, as the fruit is growing, I think, "Should have pruned harder - like this spot..." We'll see. Then the Stella cherry. This is a tree that is on dwarf root stock but doesn't realize it. It just wants to grow tall. But I keep working on it. I used to struggle with birds. One year I made a deal - they could have the ones far up, and I'd take the ones farther down. That actually worked until the day I got a ladder and took some of theirs. The tree was devastated after that. So the next year I made a deal - they could have some, but I would take all I wanted. Then along came a new pest - the spotted wing drosophila. Unlike most fruit flies who go after overripe fruit, this little *kitten* attacks fruit before it's even ripe. So when I pick a cherry, it has a tiny hole in it and leaks juice. And of course an egg or worm, but I'm not so worried about that. If I don't eat the cherry in one or two days, it's rotten. I really don't like them at all.

    Next was the roses. That was easy.

    Then I got dirty.

    If I said my beets were several weeks overdue for weeding, it would be a gross understatement. Now they have a chance. I was as careful as I could be not to pull any up, but I think I pulled up a few. If I hadn't done this, they would have had no chance at all. I planted them maybe a week too late, but I'm still hoping to have some ready to eat in the next weeks or month. I almost ran out of daylight. But I had just enough left to get out the hula hoe and have a little go after the weeds growing in the artichoke patch. They will need more work.

    It was good to spend a few hours with my plants and my soil. Now it's martini time! 🍸 🍸 🍸
  • mockchoc
    mockchoc Posts: 6,573 Member
    I'm using this as a chance to brag about my husband's gardening skills, of which I have known. He had always been into gardening, having grown up on a farm. He even found some land to start a garden when he lived n apartment!

    We live in a house with over 1.5 acres of land, which he specifically wanted so he could grow things. Our huge garden will have a variety of lettuce, a large variety of tomatoes, omatoes, strawberries, broccoli, cauliflower, potatoes, carrots, zucchini and yellow squash and a variety of peppers (including jalapenos). Also grows some grapes, raspberries and blackberries...but the birds usually get to those, first. Oh, we also have 2 peach trees.

    Right now, he has built an indoor garden that grows a variety of lettuce and greens (spinach and kale). Ironically, he is not a very healthy eater, but he started the indoor lettuce and greens because he was tired of me buying crap stuff from the store. He's currently experimenting with growing strawberries I doors. Like I said...I just eat and cook the stuff and get it once it's ready, but otherwise don't have much at all to do with it.

    You are so very lucky! Do use it all as much as you can. Also if you use it in your cooking I'm sure he'll eat it and be very healthy too.
  • Has anyone tried the winter sowing method with milk jugs? I just put some out yesterday, sweet peas, larkspur and mignonette. I know larkspur and mignonette prefer being direct seeded, but I moved my cutting flower garden raised bed and am still in the process of digging it in and refilling it. I’m not sure I’ll have it ready in time to direct seed, though I might.
    I’m excited about the winter sowing though, and hope it goes well!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 27,517 Member
    Has anyone tried the winter sowing method with milk jugs? I just put some out yesterday, sweet peas, larkspur and mignonette. I know larkspur and mignonette prefer being direct seeded, but I moved my cutting flower garden raised bed and am still in the process of digging it in and refilling it. I’m not sure I’ll have it ready in time to direct seed, though I might.
    I’m excited about the winter sowing though, and hope it goes well!

    You mean using them as mini-greenhouses or cloches? If so, yes. But only as a small season-extender at front end of the season. If you mean something else (and I suspect you do), then no. I have sown seed in peat or homemade newspaper mini-pots for later in-ground planting (fine for many things that don't mostly like being transplanted), but that's not going to going to provide stratification, inherently.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 26,342 Member
    Has anyone tried the winter sowing method with milk jugs? I just put some out yesterday, sweet peas, larkspur and mignonette. I know larkspur and mignonette prefer being direct seeded, but I moved my cutting flower garden raised bed and am still in the process of digging it in and refilling it. I’m not sure I’ll have it ready in time to direct seed, though I might.
    I’m excited about the winter sowing though, and hope it goes well!

    You must be someplace warmer than me :)

    Here in Zone 6b my ground is frozen and my Average Last Frost: 04/20-05/20 :(
  • Yes, I’m using them as mini greenhouses. @AnnPT77, do you have any advice or tips on using them? I’m in zone 6a and am only doing perennials and hardy annuals at the moment. The blog I was reading said to start those in Jan/Feb in zone 5b, so doing the same in zone 6a should be fine hopefully.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 27,517 Member
    Yes, I’m using them as mini greenhouses. @AnnPT77, do you have any advice or tips on using them? I’m in zone 6a and am only doing perennials and hardy annuals at the moment. The blog I was reading said to start those in Jan/Feb in zone 5b, so doing the same in zone 6a should be fine hopefully.

    Like I said, I used them as season extenders at the front end, usually for things I *was* direct seeding in the ground, like hills of cucurbits (cucumbers, squash, etc.). About the only thing I can think of that may be helpful (and you probably know it already) is to be pretty attentive to the influence of day to day weather.

    If it's warm-ish, but really sunny (and they're in the sun), it can get really hot in there. Uncapping or otherwise venting may be necessary, especially if there'll be a huge contrast between the overnight temps in the dark, and the sunlit day temps in the jugs.

    Another factor is the humidity. Especially when the seedlings are new, quite a few things are susceptible to damping off (usually fungal). It's more likely if cool, moist conditions. Other than good hygiene up front (sterilizing pots, not using potting soil, and that sort of thing), ventilation and not letting things stay too humid/wet inside the container is about all you can do. There are folk preventatives like chamomile tea on the soil (supposed to be high in sulfur, sulfur is antifungal), but I don't know how effective it is. Main thing is avoiding the conditions.

    So, watching weather, and adjusting moisture, ventilation, heat, maybe providing cold protection if it's extra cold overnight - that's all I can think of.
  • icemom011
    icemom011 Posts: 999 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Yes, I’m using them as mini greenhouses. @AnnPT77, do you have any advice or tips on using them? I’m in zone 6a and am only doing perennials and hardy annuals at the moment. The blog I was reading said to start those in Jan/Feb in zone 5b, so doing the same in zone 6a should be fine hopefully.

    Like I said, I used them as season extenders at the front end, usually for things I *was* direct seeding in the ground, like hills of cucurbits (cucumbers, squash, etc.). About the only thing I can think of that may be helpful (and you probably know it already) is to be pretty attentive to the influence of day to day weather.

    If it's warm-ish, but really sunny (and they're in the sun), it can get really hot in there. Uncapping or otherwise venting may be necessary, especially if there'll be a huge contrast between the overnight temps in the dark, and the sunlit day temps in the jugs.

    Another factor is the humidity. Especially when the seedlings are new, quite a few things are susceptible to damping off (usually fungal). It's more likely if cool, moist conditions. Other than good hygiene up front (sterilizing pots, not using potting soil, and that sort of thing), ventilation and not letting things stay too humid/wet inside the container is about all you can do. There are folk preventatives like chamomile tea on the soil (supposed to be high in sulfur, sulfur is antifungal), but I don't know how effective it is. Main thing is avoiding the conditions.

    So, watching weather, and adjusting moisture, ventilation, heat, maybe providing cold protection if it's extra cold overnight - that's all I can think of.

    I have a question about potting soil, or rather @AnnPT77 your advice against using it. What do you use? I actually have experienced my seedlings doing very poorly and dying, but i thought it had to do with bad seeds. Now it seems like my potting soil was at fault. My mom said she bakes her potting soil before planting. I always thought it was a bit excessive. I guess I'm wrong? What do you do? This year most my seedlings did really well, it was possibly same leftover bag of soil. Maybe not, not sure.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 27,517 Member
    edited January 2021
    icemom011 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Yes, I’m using them as mini greenhouses. @AnnPT77, do you have any advice or tips on using them? I’m in zone 6a and am only doing perennials and hardy annuals at the moment. The blog I was reading said to start those in Jan/Feb in zone 5b, so doing the same in zone 6a should be fine hopefully.

    Like I said, I used them as season extenders at the front end, usually for things I *was* direct seeding in the ground, like hills of cucurbits (cucumbers, squash, etc.). About the only thing I can think of that may be helpful (and you probably know it already) is to be pretty attentive to the influence of day to day weather.

    If it's warm-ish, but really sunny (and they're in the sun), it can get really hot in there. Uncapping or otherwise venting may be necessary, especially if there'll be a huge contrast between the overnight temps in the dark, and the sunlit day temps in the jugs.

    Another factor is the humidity. Especially when the seedlings are new, quite a few things are susceptible to damping off (usually fungal). It's more likely if cool, moist conditions. Other than good hygiene up front (sterilizing pots, not using potting soil, and that sort of thing), ventilation and not letting things stay too humid/wet inside the container is about all you can do. There are folk preventatives like chamomile tea on the soil (supposed to be high in sulfur, sulfur is antifungal), but I don't know how effective it is. Main thing is avoiding the conditions.

    So, watching weather, and adjusting moisture, ventilation, heat, maybe providing cold protection if it's extra cold overnight - that's all I can think of.

    I have a question about potting soil, or rather @AnnPT77 your advice against using it. What do you use? I actually have experienced my seedlings doing very poorly and dying, but i thought it had to do with bad seeds. Now it seems like my potting soil was at fault. My mom said she bakes her potting soil before planting. I always thought it was a bit excessive. I guess I'm wrong? What do you do? This year most my seedlings did really well, it was possibly same leftover bag of soil. Maybe not, not sure.

    Ooops, typo. I meant to say "not RE-using potting soil". Sorry. I meant not to take the soil out of an old pot, then use it for new seedlings. You're just trying to reduce chances of extra pathogens in the soil from previous use, potentially things that could be non-problems for established plants, but a challenge for seedlings. (I reuse potting soil for established plants, which is sloppy, but I wouldn't usually do it for seeds.)

    The baking is for sterility. Baking has pros and cons - basically, IMU, kills some pathogens, but also possibly some beneficials. I think you would be best using bagged seed-starting mix (not exactly the same as general potting soil IMU).

    You could look up "damping off" and see whether that sounds like the problem you've sometimes had with seedlings.

    Again, apologies for the typo that caused misunderstanding!
  • icemom011
    icemom011 Posts: 999 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    icemom011 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Yes, I’m using them as mini greenhouses. @AnnPT77, do you have any advice or tips on using them? I’m in zone 6a and am only doing perennials and hardy annuals at the moment. The blog I was reading said to start those in Jan/Feb in zone 5b, so doing the same in zone 6a should be fine hopefully.

    Like I said, I used them as season extenders at the front end, usually for things I *was* direct seeding in the ground, like hills of cucurbits (cucumbers, squash, etc.). About the only thing I can think of that may be helpful (and you probably know it already) is to be pretty attentive to the influence of day to day weather.

    If it's warm-ish, but really sunny (and they're in the sun), it can get really hot in there. Uncapping or otherwise venting may be necessary, especially if there'll be a huge contrast between the overnight temps in the dark, and the sunlit day temps in the jugs.

    Another factor is the humidity. Especially when the seedlings are new, quite a few things are susceptible to damping off (usually fungal). It's more likely if cool, moist conditions. Other than good hygiene up front (sterilizing pots, not using potting soil, and that sort of thing), ventilation and not letting things stay too humid/wet inside the container is about all you can do. There are folk preventatives like chamomile tea on the soil (supposed to be high in sulfur, sulfur is antifungal), but I don't know how effective it is. Main thing is avoiding the conditions.

    So, watching weather, and adjusting moisture, ventilation, heat, maybe providing cold protection if it's extra cold overnight - that's all I can think of.

    I have a question about potting soil, or rather @AnnPT77 your advice against using it. What do you use? I actually have experienced my seedlings doing very poorly and dying, but i thought it had to do with bad seeds. Now it seems like my potting soil was at fault. My mom said she bakes her potting soil before planting. I always thought it was a bit excessive. I guess I'm wrong? What do you do? This year most my seedlings did really well, it was possibly same leftover bag of soil. Maybe not, not sure.

    Ooops, typo. I meant to say "not RE-using potting soil". Sorry. I meant not to take the soil out of an old pot, then use it for new seedlings. You're just trying to reduce chances of extra pathogens in the soil from previous use, potentially things that could be non-problems for established plants, but a challenge for seedlings. (I reuse potting soil for established plants, which is sloppy, but I wouldn't usually do it for seeds.)

    The baking is for sterility. Baking has pros and cons - basically, IMU, kills some pathogens, but also possibly some beneficials. I think you would be best using bagged seed-starting mix (not exactly the same as general potting soil IMU).

    You could look up "damping off" and see whether that sounds like the problem you've sometimes had with seedlings.

    Again, apologies for the typo that caused misunderstanding!

    Ah, ok. Makes sense. I do put old used seedling soil in the garden, but don't reuse it for seeds. So i guess I'm back to my original conclusion that the tomato seeds were bad last year. I bought from different company this year and they're thriving. Thank you very much for clarifying! "Damping off" is a possibility too, but I've actually replanted three times and i think changed the soil mix too, but same thing happened over and over. First time the mix was definitely too rich and stayed wet too long. Definitely appreciate the tip, thank you!
  • French_Peasant
    French_Peasant Posts: 1,638 Member
    Yes, I’m using them as mini greenhouses. @AnnPT77, do you have any advice or tips on using them? I’m in zone 6a and am only doing perennials and hardy annuals at the moment. The blog I was reading said to start those in Jan/Feb in zone 5b, so doing the same in zone 6a should be fine hopefully.

    I, too, will be winter sowing for the first time ever this year.

    Normally I start everything under lights/on heat mats, but I helped my teenage daughter start a mini flower farm while her little 8th grade life was destroyed under Covid quarantine last year, so this year seed starting space is at a premium. (She's now saving up for a trip to Italy with her Latin class for 2022).

    We are now growing flowers and veg for our own garden, a plot in a neighbors yard, and two separate gardens on vacant urban lots. We'll be sowing ten 128-plug flats under lights (planning for 2 separate flights), doubling our cold frame space, stuffing a few more odds and ends on the windowsill, and preparing probably 20+ wintersown jugs outside. Right now we are sowing a variety of alliums, brassicas, and hardy annuals; I'll wait till March to sow more tender plants like tomatoes, marigolds, celosia, etc. I'm doing some A-B testing to compare selected varieties under lights vs. wintersown.

    Winter sowing is a very specific process and has its own USDA definition. My understanding is that you need to *trust the process* and not second guess things; the seeds will know when to wake up but they need proper preparation. It's important to use a high quality, clean potting mix, not seed starting mix, because not a lot of precipitation will be coming in through the open tops of the milk jugs, and the potting mix will allow moisture to be retained better. if you haven't already discovered it, you can access a ton of great links/info on Wintersown.org; the Winter Sowers FB page has been extremely helpful as well.

    I'm kind of on the fence with the larkspur; I'm planning on doing a 3-way test with winter sowing, direct sowing and starting under lights in deep paper pots, and am very interested to see what does best. I am between zones 5b and 6a and really wish I could plant them out in the fall, but maybe that will be an experiment for later in the year.

  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 27,517 Member
    @gracegettingittogether, definitely listen to @French_Peasant over me. She knows much more, and it's much more currrent knowledge as well.
  • French_Peasant
    French_Peasant Posts: 1,638 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    @gracegettingittogether, definitely listen to @French_Peasant over me. She knows much more, and it's much more currrent knowledge as well.

    Well, I think she should listen to us both! :D I just happened to have some insights on it because I've been following a bunch of flower farmers on youtube and instagram and learning all kinds of fancy new things!


  • gracegettingittogether
    gracegettingittogether Posts: 176 Member
    edited January 2021
    Thank you both, it’s very helpful. I’ve been meaning to try this method for a year. I stumbled upon this method of starting seeds last year right after it was time to start them. I’ve gardened for years but focused on native perennials. They are great, but I’ve been lately starting to grow cottage garden flowers that need richer soil, as I’ve found that native flowers don’t tend to have the same lushness that I’m aiming for. I planted my first cutting flower garden last year but it was in the wrong spot and didn’t get enough sun, which I couldn’t tell in the spring. I also realized that if I want to grow the cooler weather annuals, I have to start earlier as we go quickly into high heat and humidity here. I don’t really have a good indoor set up to start seeds, especially as our cats eat all inside plants. I had kind of given up on starting seeds early until I found this method, recommended by the Impatient Gardener blog.

    I’m also rethinking the larkspur as I keep reading in various places that they really do best direct seeded.

    Which gardeners are you following? I found out about Floret Farms about 3 years ago and got her book on cutting gardens. I really like the Impatient Gardener, as well as Garden Answer and the Dave’s Garden site. My mom and I got on an old gardening books kick last spring and had a great time reading Thalassa Cruso, Allen Lacy, Monty Don and the author of Island Magic. I always like hearing of other gardeners to learn from!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 27,517 Member
    Thank you both, it’s very helpful. I’ve been meaning to try this method for a year. I stumbled upon this method of starting seeds last year right after it was time to start them. I’ve gardened for years but focused on native perennials. They are great, but I’ve been lately starting to grow cottage garden flowers that need richer soil, as I’ve found that native flowers don’t tend to have the same lushness that I’m aiming for. I planted my first cutting flower garden last year but it was in the wrong spot and didn’t get enough sun, which I couldn’t tell in the spring. I also realized that if I want to grow the cooler weather annuals, I have to start earlier as we go quickly into high heat and humidity here. I don’t really have a good indoor set up to start seeds, especially as our cats eat all inside plants. I had kind of given up on starting seeds early until I found this method, recommended by the Impatient Gardener blog.

    I’m also rethinking the larkspur as I keep reading in various places that they really do best direct seeded.

    Which gardeners are you following? I found out about Floret Farms about 3 years ago and got her book on cutting gardens. I really like the Impatient Gardener, as well as Garden Answer and the Dave’s Garden site. My mom and I got on an old gardening books kick last spring and had a great time reading Thalassa Cruso, Allen Lacy, Monty Don and the author of Island Magic. I always like hearing of other gardeners to learn from!

    One of the reasons French_Peasant knows more (that's more current) than I, is that I don't really do what I'd call gardening any more. I collect weird perennials, still, a bit (lummesome oddball plants); have a bunch of houseplants; grow some perennial herbs amongst the outdoor weirdos; watch my neighbor plant things in my old vegetable bed and SMH (30 feet of rhubarb?!?); usually do a few pots of colorful annual flowers (leaning toward ones the hummingbirds like); sometimes add some potted annual herbs. That's about it. It's not a garden: It doesn't gel into a beautiful cohesive whole like that. It's just a bunch of random plants.

    Years back, I did a lot of veggie gardening, seed-starting, the season-extending stuff, canning/freezing/pickling/jam/etc., did the Master Gardener cert, volunteered at botanical gardens - kind of the whole nine yards. So, every once in a while someone asks a question here that I delusionally believe I have a decades-old answer to, and I take a shot.

    I don't really follow anyone, anymore. If I buy a new oddball plant, I look up that one thing in a panic, and try to figure it out.

    🤣🤣🤣

    Timber Press seems still to be putting out some good stuff (I'm on their email list). My go-to for veggie/herb/annual info & seeds is Johnny's Selected Seeds, but they're for us Northern gardeners primarily (I'm in Michigan, middle of the palm). Brooklyn Botanic Gardens used to have some good publications, and I suspect they still do. I mostly shop some slightly niche-y local-ish plant retailers or nurseries. I don't like to mail order plants, but Plant Delights Nursery, that I can think of off the top of my head, has some fun oddballs.

    I have a boatload of plant and garden books from my past gardening era, most of them sturdy nuts and bolts tomes with names like "Conifers" or "Ferns for American Gardens". Among more people-oriented garden books, I thought "The Explorer's Garden" (Hinkley) was fun.
  • Oh, “The Explorer’s Garden” was one of the ones we read! It was fun. My goodness, it was amazing how quickly and passionately he dived into really hardcore gardening and plant expeditions.

    Have you read Margery Fish’s “We Made a Garden”? Her extremely unpleasant marriage dynamics aside, I find her intense observation of and personal attachment to her plants fascinating.

    I like Louise Beebe Wilder a lot too. She’s inspiring and kind of sad too, to read. She often refers to common gardening practices or plants of her time, and it’s startling to realize how extensive and common gardening was to Americans, 100 years ago. Her “Fragrant Gardens” is my inspiration for fragrant gardens of my own, hopefully following in the steps of countless Americans of other generations.

    Would you mind mentioning more authors that you like? My mom isn’t able to garden extensively anymore as my father progresses in Alzheimer’s and she really likes reading gardening books. She used to can extensively too, has a huge number of houseplants, and has always been an avid gardener and reader. I always like finding her more authors and books to read. She like nuts and bolts books as well as the more people oriented ones.

    I do like Johnny’s Selected Seeds, and am waiting on an order I placed from them. I haven’t heard of Timber Press, so thank you! I can’t wait to look them up.

    I personally like older gardening advice and books, because it’s tried and true. I do like new plants and approaches like Floret Farms, but appreciate thoroughly tested gardeners, as they have so many gems of knowledge.