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Question for those who weigh their food and live with other people

Mazintrov13Mazintrov13 Member Posts: 124 Member Member Posts: 124 Member
Do the people you live find it strange or make comments? If so what do you say?
Asking because I am moving out as I’m separating from my partner and will be living with a flat mate and kind of nervous to be weighing food around her because of comments? I normally don’t mention I weigh my food to anyone as it’s not usually necessary, but my ex commented on it all the time and though it was weird. I prefer to weigh everything as opposed to eating intuitively as I like to be accurate with my macros and mainly to make sure I’m getting enough calories as I weight train 5 days and have an active job while trying to build muscle! I also meal prep and I find it convenient to just weigh everything
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Replies

  • LazyBlondeChefLazyBlondeChef Member, Premium Posts: 1,048 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,048 Member
    I live with my partner and he doesn't find it strange. He uses the scale himself some of the time for things like meat, cheese, nuts and other higher calorie items.

    I weigh nearly everything with the exception of non-starchy vegetables that are only 20 calories for a cup. Those I just eyeball. I'm not one to care what other people think so I would carry on with the weighing even if I had guests in my house.
  • tinkerbellang83tinkerbellang83 Member Posts: 8,915 Member Member Posts: 8,915 Member
    My other half has never really commented on it, my former flatmate didn't either.

    As it's a flat mate rather than anyone significantly close to you, I don't think there is any need to explain yourself. I am sure there'll be some things you might also find they do that you think is weird, but unless it affects you personally you probably wouldn't say anything to them right?!
  • jasdebi2012jasdebi2012 Member Posts: 15 Member Member Posts: 15 Member
    just show them the muscles and tell them "you can't have these without weighting" or "going intuitive" (even if that's a word). If intuitive eating was not a made-up a thing, then people wouldn't be having deficiencies. Intuitive eating relies to someone not undereating or overeating in average, but not everyone is able to do it. I don't think that anybody can do it.
    So yes, don't be listening to those comments or don't let them get to you. If they are bashing you for the way you eat or what/how you feel comfortable eating, then they have the problem. The only problem would be if it affects your everyday social life in a bad way (e.g. you never go out because you can't weight the restaurant food). Going out once or twice every now and then, and eating "intuitively" those days, won't destroy your muscles.
    Another thing which might be problematic is if you weight everything very precisely. First of all you can't be sure that all pieces of the same meat for example will have the quoted proteins or fats, neither you can rely on the gram-precision of the scale. So yes, even scaling works well "on average". E.g. if your salmon is 100g doesn't necesatily mean that you'll be taking 20g of protein from it (you might be getting 18g or 22g just from fluctuations from the cut and the fat/water content)...
    edited January 28
  • scarlett_kscarlett_k Member Posts: 725 Member Member Posts: 725 Member
    My husband doesn't find it strange. I think *I* found it strange to begin with but now it's just normal for me. It's the way I can control my food intake in a healthy way and it's helped me stop associating food with guilt.
  • callsitlikeiseeitcallsitlikeiseeit Member Posts: 8,153 Member Member Posts: 8,153 Member
    my husband never says anything. he knows why I do it.

    my daughter (who was in high school) never said anything

    my son never says anything

    even my EX never said anything (I was with him when I lost the majority of my weight years ago)

    honestly, unless your new roommate is a total ..... I doubt they would say anything, other than initially asking you what you're doing or why. Women especially, tend to get it or at least shrug it off as a weight loss thing (and who among us hasn't tried some weird stuff, though this is certainly not strange compared to many other things) lol

    its also effective... so there's that LOL
  • Chef_BarbellChef_Barbell Member Posts: 6,279 Member Member Posts: 6,279 Member
    My family never says anything about it. Seeing as how I used a food scale before I started losing weight for cooking and baking accuracy, it doesn't look or seem strange.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,640 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,640 Member
    My daughter laughs when I weigh ice cream. But it's because I don't weigh it in a bowl. I buy pints, then I weigh it before eating and get the total weight. Then I'll eat a little and reweigh. I'll keep doing this until I've eaten one serving then recap the pint and put it away.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
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    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 25,873 Member Member Posts: 25,873 Member
    My husband used to make fun of me, too, until I gave him a demonstration of weighing oatmeal and the calorie difference between a measuring cup and the scale. He uses it now for everything. He’s a convert. Don’t let people get to you. Just do it.

    This was my experience. When I began weighing food, my husband was initially worried that I was going too far. I showed him the difference between "2 tablespoons" (supposedly 32 grams) of peanut butter and an actual 32 grams of peanut butter. He immediately understood why I'd want to use a scale for calorie dense foods.
  • spiriteagle99spiriteagle99 Member Posts: 3,193 Member Member Posts: 3,193 Member
    The first time she asks, explain what you're doing and why. After that, just say, "It works for me."
  • TxTiffaniTxTiffani Member Posts: 669 Member Member Posts: 669 Member
    My husband asked what I was doing at first and I told him that I have no idea what correct serving sizes look like and I’m using the scale to be accurate with my calories. He never asked again...just used to it now I guess.
  • ExpressoLove11ExpressoLove11 Member Posts: 328 Member Member Posts: 328 Member
    When I moved back in with my parents they found it annoying but I just carried on without comment and now they don't even notice anymore. I wouldn't worry, just do what you have to do.
  • SouthWestLondonSouthWestLondon Member Posts: 123 Member Member Posts: 123 Member
    My husband has rolled his eyes once or twice when I'm weighing very odd things - like when I pop a slice of bread on the scales before buttering it to weigh how much butter is in my sandwich!

    But we bake a lot, and he cooks a lot using recipes - and in the UK we don't tend to use volume measurements anyway, and weight based recipes are the norm (I've never understood why the US isn't the same - I hate volume measurements) so it was never unusual in our house to have the kitchen scales out and well used. It's just now slightly unusual some of the ways I use it...
  • Fit_Happens_2021Fit_Happens_2021 Member Posts: 270 Member Member Posts: 270 Member
    If they show a reaction or ask a question I would just briefly explain the benefits, and if any argument or criticism I would just end it with "Well this is what works for me, we are all different." and shrug it off.
    At the end of the day, it is no one's business but yours. My family doesn't see it as odd once I told them why I started doing it years ago. It makes absolute sense to weigh your food, and if anyone accuses you of being obsessive (which is a common criticism) you can express bemusement at their apparent over-interest in your eating habits.
  • RetiredAndLovingItRetiredAndLovingIt Member Posts: 1,032 Member Member Posts: 1,032 Member
    I weigh things around hubby and he does sometimes. I won't do it around my grandkids (age 10-14). I don't think it is something they should be concerned with now.
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