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What is "fit", to you?

2

Replies

  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,906 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Excellent thread, @WandRsmom and great answers. I always like hearing from @AnnPT77 and @ninerbuff, who have different, but both very interesting, points of view. What is great about the discussion is that, before investing a lot of time and effort in achieving something, you think carefully about what it is you want to achieve. In the area of fitness, that just means that you set some sort of reasonable goal.

    (BTW: Some goals are less useful than others. I have seen several people set the goal of "seeing their abs" because that's what celebrities often look like. Everyone must know that, when your livelihood depends on it, you may take steps that are quite unnecessary, like having lipo, etc.)
    There's a guy in our gym who seems to be pretty fit but ALWAYS does this balance ball exercise. First he'll get on a balance ball and stand on it. Then he'll put it on top of a box job (24") and continue till he's on the highest box jump. I have asked him why he does it and response was for core strength. What's the actual application that this can be used for? No idea.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    I knew someone - with access to excellent coaches, BTW - who trained himself to stand on a stability ball to help improve ability to balance a single racing shell (rowing). (Those little suckers are tippy: Usually around 26 feet long, about 12 inches wide at the waterline; many won't sit upright in the water without oars in them.)

    Given his personality, I think it may also have been a bit of a personal challenge thing, and also a bit of a stunt. I don't know about the boxes, though.
  • WandRsmom
    WandRsmom Posts: 253 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Excellent thread, @WandRsmom and great answers. I always like hearing from @AnnPT77 and @ninerbuff, who have different, but both very interesting, points of view. What is great about the discussion is that, before investing a lot of time and effort in achieving something, you think carefully about what it is you want to achieve. In the area of fitness, that just means that you set some sort of reasonable goal.

    (BTW: Some goals are less useful than others. I have seen several people set the goal of "seeing their abs" because that's what celebrities often look like. Everyone must know that, when your livelihood depends on it, you may take steps that are quite unnecessary, like having lipo, etc.)
    There's a guy in our gym who seems to be pretty fit but ALWAYS does this balance ball exercise. First he'll get on a balance ball and stand on it. Then he'll put it on top of a box job (24") and continue till he's on the highest box jump. I have asked him why he does it and response was for core strength. What's the actual application that this can be used for? No idea.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Wow. That's a first I have heard of this. Interesting.
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,842 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Excellent thread, @WandRsmom and great answers. I always like hearing from @AnnPT77 and @ninerbuff, who have different, but both very interesting, points of view. What is great about the discussion is that, before investing a lot of time and effort in achieving something, you think carefully about what it is you want to achieve. In the area of fitness, that just means that you set some sort of reasonable goal.

    (BTW: Some goals are less useful than others. I have seen several people set the goal of "seeing their abs" because that's what celebrities often look like. Everyone must know that, when your livelihood depends on it, you may take steps that are quite unnecessary, like having lipo, etc.)
    There's a guy in our gym who seems to be pretty fit but ALWAYS does this balance ball exercise. First he'll get on a balance ball and stand on it. Then he'll put it on top of a box job (24") and continue till he's on the highest box jump. I have asked him why he does it and response was for core strength. What's the actual application that this can be used for? No idea.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Fit for doing stunts for social media!

    So the end goal I suppose in those cases would be likes?
  • SunnyBunBun79
    SunnyBunBun79 Posts: 2,228 Member
    If I can do this some day I will consider myself fit :D

    d2ifej5thwca.gif
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,072 Member
    If I can do this some day I will consider myself fit :D

    d2ifej5thwca.gif

    Oh, you will be able to do it. But the practicing before you get it right is going to KILL you.
  • MadisonMolly2017
    MadisonMolly2017 Posts: 10,943 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    If I can do this some day I will consider myself fit :D

    d2ifej5thwca.gif

    Oh, you will be able to do it. But the practicing before you get it right is going to KILL you.

    Hahaha!
  • Avidkeo
    Avidkeo Posts: 3,190 Member
    edited February 2021
    Jumping on.

    I would consider my self incredibly fit. I can run over 15km easily, I can lift weights and run around after my kids.

    I'm also currently over weight and would like to lose around 20lb to be a bit healthier as I get older. That said, according to health numbers (cholesterol, BP, HR etc) I'm very healthy, nothing to worry about. May that continue.

    ETA my aspiration is my team leader. She is 76, yet she has the ability and attitude of someone in their 30s. She works in a busy xray department, goes walking, on trips, etc. She is young at hear as well as able to do everything she wants still. She is retiring at the end of March and I'm going to miss her energy and enthusiasm a lot.

    Id like to be like her!

    Oh and my other role model, my old boss who at 73 still runs half marathons.
  • MinTheKitCat
    MinTheKitCat Posts: 173 Member
    For me it boils down to feeling good in my own body and being able to enjoy daily activities and the joy of movement.
    Broken down this more or less equates to;
    -Cardiovascular health: both for the biomechanics and for the benefits of endurance
    - joint health: cause age + all the crap I put my body thru ages 13 -28
    - Muscular health/agility: being strong and flexible enough to do what I enjoy rather than watch wistfully from the sidelines
    - Mental and emotional well being: for me this is very strongly connected to feeling strong and safe in my body
    - SLEEP hygiene: this is the one I struggle with the most 😕
  • DonnasWay0805
    DonnasWay0805 Posts: 37 Member
    Being 56... I started at 50.. I have lost and maintained a 90 lb loss. It's 30 min of fitness at least 3 to 4 times a week. And eating clean as possible with a calorie deficit. I will do this the rest of my life... It's simple and sustainable❤️
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,876 Member
    I'm not sure if it's a great benchmark of fitness, but this is something my husband told me after I lost weight, and it stuck with me...

    We were on a hike, and slogged up a particularly steep set of switchbacks. At the top, we were both out of breath and needed to stop.

    Once I could talk, I said, "I thought we were in better shape than this!" He said, "You can be really fit and still get out of breath...it's more about your recovery time." Within 30 seconds of stopping, we were both breathing normally and ready to move again.

    It could be BS, but for me, I pay attention to how long it takes me to go from totally out of breath, unable to talk...to recovered and ready to press on.

    I did a stress test in 2014 at a cardiologists office...that was a big part of it. My dad had just passed from a heart attack and I have a lot of the crappy genetics my dad has so my Dr. wanted to get it checked out. Uphill battle for me, but I passed that thing with flying colors.
  • fitnessguy266
    fitnessguy266 Posts: 150 Member
    Individual perspective and preference, for sure with this one. After much trial and error with learning how to progressively build muscle and improve my overall health, my BF% and day to day energy have a direct correlation to how "fit" I feel. For myself personally, I feel at my best and "fit" at 9% BF.
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,155 Member
    edited February 2021
    I want to get my resting heart rate down, I guess that is what "fit" means to me. I remember years ago in my early 40s my doctor telling me it was excellent at 58 bpm. Now I am 55 and it is running about 70. If I can improve my cardio fitness I think the rest is a bonus.
  • iFartMagic
    iFartMagic Posts: 21 Member
    Honestly? After losing 80 lbs, being fit has been reduced to being able to walk the supermarket without my blood pressure bottoming out, or get out of bed without being out of breath. Never going back.
  • MikePfirrman
    MikePfirrman Posts: 3,307 Member
    Over the years, as I've gotten more in shape, I think my definition has risen to a higher bar. But I do think that certain elements of cardio, strength, and perhaps even flexibility, should be included.

    I suppose that a certain benchmark of certain lifts or cardio ability would be helpful in a true determination of fitness. But what I find also with age (I'll be 57 this year) is that some that can't run any more can bike or row or do other activities that are also hard -- just different -- than running.

    Also, with lifting, joint problems start to crop up. For instance, I can't do heavy deadlifts any longer (and I know few that are close to 60 that can), but I do other workarounds in order to lift some decent amounts of weight.

    I tend to agree with Ann -- it becomes more and more about functional fitness and ability to do the physical things you love and do them well enough or even better than a lot of younger folks.

    I recently moved my daughter across country. There were three twenty/early 30 something females -- none of them in terrible shape. But I was the one that ran boxes up and down 3 flights of stairs for two days, nearly non stop. I'm not exaggerating when I say 40 to 50 times a day, for two days solid, while carrying weight. To me, that's the reason why I do the "fitness" stuff -- to have the strength and stamina to do things like this. My daughter finished college nearly 10 years ago. Doing this kind of thing at my age is usually impossible for most.
  • SunnyBunBun79
    SunnyBunBun79 Posts: 2,228 Member
    Having just one chin 🤪
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,970 Member
    Fitness to me means cardiovascular health and aerobic capacity - having a good VO2max. Unless we're talking about Darwin. 😉. I agree everybody should have functional strength, that isn't part of my understanding of what fit means. Maybe that will change. Aesthetics has even less (than nothing) to do with it.

    The guys in le tour de France are extremely fit. They look like they're in a concentration camp, some of them look like they might not be able to lift the bikes they ride.

    Having strength and muscle is a good thing, I just think it falls under a different word.