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Any ditched the fitness trackers? Any regrets?

dave_in_nidave_in_ni Member Posts: 533 Member Member Posts: 533 Member
I've been through the majority of them over the past 5-6 years, everything from Fitbit to Garmin to Apple. Made the decision last week that I really don't need to track everything and I don't need notifications for everything. Went back to my G-Shock and it feels so freeing to be honest.

Accuracy of them is somewhat questionable anyway
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Replies

  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 25,147 Member Member Posts: 25,147 Member
    I lost my FitBit one some years back and didn't bother to replace it. I use a "dumb" pedometer when I go on walks.

    I can eat back 75-100% of the calories from the MFP database and lose as expected. Right now it's 100% because I've created some custom entries for light and moderate gardening - I only use the regular gardening entry when I'm doing heavy gardening.
  • scarlett_kscarlett_k Member Posts: 729 Member Member Posts: 729 Member
    I love my garmin. I've been using it for 4 years almost constantly. I love being able to see how much more active I've become, see how far and where I walked, and I enjoy the challenges for badges just as a bit of fun. I don't have any notifications turned on on it (or on the phone app) though.
    edited May 23
  • Noreenmarie1234Noreenmarie1234 Member Posts: 6,861 Member Member Posts: 6,861 Member
    I could never because I wear my Apple Watch constantly unless it’s charging. I turn off all annoying notifications though, what ones do you get? I don’t get any on my watch.

    I like to see my heart rate date during runs/biking. I like seeing my steps for the day.
    edited May 23
  • yirarayirara Member Posts: 6,734 Member Member Posts: 6,734 Member
    I kind of love my garmin. Mainly because I'm a number and data girl. It doesn't drive me crazy though.
  • vanmepvanmep Member Posts: 393 Member Member Posts: 393 Member
    I wore a Fitbit for a couple days and it made me feel claustrophobic - I have issues lol. So that was that.
  • Gisel2015Gisel2015 Member Posts: 3,987 Member Member Posts: 3,987 Member
    I never had a fitness tracker; I don't care for gadgets and I don't want to get hooked to one. The only thing that I use when I go for a walk is the MapmyWalk app in my cell phone, just to know how many miles I walked, duration, and speed.

    Burned calories are not important either because I don't log them or eat them back. I have a set range of calories that I eat, regardless of my workouts (not very impressive or consistent right now), and my method is good enough to keep me at the right weight. In maintenance for 11 years.

    I have seen many people attached to their watches or trackers keeping track of whatever they do, and I decided that it is not for me. I do like data but I also know that I would be hooked to the trackers and probably develop a compulsion. I don't need that.
  • PAV8888PAV8888 Member Posts: 8,964 Member Member Posts: 8,964 Member
    Would I be "able" to live without my Fitbit? I certainly didn't die during the week I was waiting for a replacement, or during the four days I was waiting for a strap from a slow moving amazon order. There has also been the time I couldn't find my charger and had to wait for the one I ordered to arrive since I was NOT going to pay the inflated in-stock store price.

    But, through the beginning of my "weight management" phase just about 90 months ago :wink: I've tried to "layer" my actions and defences against reverting to my pre weight management state of obesity and inactivity.

    Why would I give up one of my more interesting and effective tools?
    edited May 23
  • moonangel12moonangel12 Member, Premium Posts: 971 Member Member, Premium Posts: 971 Member
    I go back and forth, but for me it’s a bit of accountability. I don’t set daily step goals, but it does help me see how active (or not) I have been during the day. I am a homeschool mom with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue, some days I get to supper and notice I didn’t do squat in the form of movement all day. So I will take that realization with me on a lap around the neighborhood 😂

    It’s also interesting for me because I can tell the days I don’t feel well based on step count...

    I bought my instinct a year and a half ago because I was triathlon training and it would work for all 3 sports. It also has a breadcrumb option for hiking in case I ever get lost :lol: hubby likes the GPS tracking so he can keep an eye on me while I am out alone, eases his mind a little. And he also sends me cheerleading texts sometimes (which pop up on my watch) so that’s a bonus! The other reason I keep it is for the heart rate monitoring... I am prone to some occasional hiccups and speed ups so if I am feeling a bit funky one glance will tell me if my heart is racing (which I double check with a manual pulse count) because I can’t always discern if that is the issue at that moment in time.

    I do contemplate getting something more basic, I definitely would still need a watch for the time! And maybe some day I will. I am not attached I don’t think... I forgot it one night before bed and my main frustration was not knowing what time it was in the middle of the night! Ha!
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 21,960 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21,960 Member
    In a way, the question doesn’t even compute, for me. I’ve long used a HRM, GPS tracker, and sometimes specialized devices to collect performance-related metrics. That was before mass-market multi-function fitness trackers were available at all.

    Now that I have a Garmin that integrates all of those, plus automates some estimates I used to do more laboriously (like resting heart rate), plus gives me estimates I didn’t have before at all, I love my Garmin. That’s true even though its all-day calorie estimate is *wildly* inaccurate for me (I don’t synch it to MFP because of that).

    I used to use a Polar HRM, and correlate it with pace/distance/time data from my Concept 2 rowing machine, tracking hoped-for things like lowered HR at the same pace, for example. I also had a Garmin (Forerunner) that would do pace/distance tracking for on-water rowing. I would use that data in junction with the Polar HR data, as well as for evaluating different technical changes or strategies. (Example: If we do 500m max-effort rowing pieces, is our double faster at 25 spm or 30 spm? (If you’re thinking 30 is always faster . . . it isn’t, because technique can degrade at higher spm.)) It took a 3rd device to get the SPM, and there were not apps to integrate all those pieces at the time, so it was ballpark-ish, or spreadsheet analysis with aggregated data streams.

    Now, Garmin gives me reasonable estimates of all that stuff – pace, SPM, HR, distance, duration – time-integrated. That’s pretty useful, and a time-saver. On top of that, it replaces the wristwatch I’ve worn most of my life (for a while in the 1970s, I carried a pocket watch, because my job was destructive to wristwatches of the era). Though I'm not competing any more, performance improvement is still part of the fun, for me.

    I do use Garmin’s calorie estimates for some exercises, where I don’t have an estimating source I consider more likely to be accurate. That’s a handy side-benefit, but not the key reason I appreciate having such a device.
    I understand that we’re all different people with different priorities, but the seeming common idea on MFP that the main point of these devices is calorie estimates and step counts . . . that’s really alien to me.
  • LoveyCharLoveyChar Member Posts: 3,683 Member Member Posts: 3,683 Member
    Never owned a tracker in my life and I never plan to. I'm a runner, thousands of miles on these feet but I know my route's mileage and I have a notebook and pen. People survived before trackers, a huge waste of money and space. Less is more, I promise.

    Adding: I run alot of miles. In less than two weeks I'm running a Marathon. But even when I'm not training for something, I still run a significant amount of miles and I walk quite a bit, too. I'll never buy a gadget, no thanks.

    Husband owns a Garmin, quite a little novelty but they're all garbage if you ask me.
    edited May 24
  • spiriteagle99spiriteagle99 Member Posts: 3,214 Member Member Posts: 3,214 Member
    I'm also a runner. I started out without a watch and would blow up in races because I had no idea what my pace was. I always started way too fast and would die about 3/4 through. Same happened on my long runs. I didn't like having to wait until I was finished to know whether I was on target or not. I got the most basic Garmin initially (FR10) and it was fine until I started doing marathons. Having it die at mile 24 was not happiness. I still stay basic with the FR 25. I like looking at my HR and sleep and calories, but I don't focus on them. I mostly just focus on pace and distance, what I need to know to make sure I'm going fast enough when I'm doing speedwork and not too fast when I'm doing long or easy runs. I could live without the information, but since I do enjoy racing, I find it useful.
    edited May 24
  • yweight2020yweight2020 Member Posts: 551 Member Member Posts: 551 Member
    I've had at least 3 different brands of fit watches and they make me neurotic so I gave them up, I couldn't and didn't believe the majority of the data just seemed to off for me and I no longer like watch wearing so no need.

    I just document the exercise I do and the length of time and I'm over it.

    I like the ideal of them, just not for me
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 25,883 Member Member Posts: 25,883 Member
    I'm also a runner. I started out without a watch and would blow up in races because I had no idea what my pace was. I always started way too fast and would die about 3/4 through. Same happened on my long runs. I didn't like having to wait until I was finished to know whether I was on target or not. I got the most basic Garmin initially (FR10) and it was fine until I started doing marathons. Having it die at mile 24 was not happiness. I still stay basic with the FR 25. I like looking at my HR and sleep and calories, but I don't focus on them. I mostly just focus on pace and distance, what I need to know to make sure I'm going fast enough when I'm doing speedwork and not too fast when I'm doing long or easy runs. I could live without the information, but since I do enjoy racing, I find it useful.

    Yes, I find the steps and mileage helpful, but pace is most important to me because I will totally burn out early if I don't focus on it.
  • dave_in_nidave_in_ni Member Posts: 533 Member Member Posts: 533 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    In a way, the question doesn’t even compute, for me. I’ve long used a HRM, GPS tracker, and sometimes specialized devices to collect performance-related metrics. That was before mass-market multi-function fitness trackers were available at all.

    Now that I have a Garmin that integrates all of those, plus automates some estimates I used to do more laboriously (like resting heart rate), plus gives me estimates I didn’t have before at all, I love my Garmin. That’s true even though its all-day calorie estimate is *wildly* inaccurate for me (I don’t synch it to MFP because of that).

    I used to use a Polar HRM, and correlate it with pace/distance/time data from my Concept 2 rowing machine, tracking hoped-for things like lowered HR at the same pace, for example. I also had a Garmin (Forerunner) that would do pace/distance tracking for on-water rowing. I would use that data in junction with the Polar HR data, as well as for evaluating different technical changes or strategies. (Example: If we do 500m max-effort rowing pieces, is our double faster at 25 spm or 30 spm? (If you’re thinking 30 is always faster . . . it isn’t, because technique can degrade at higher spm.)) It took a 3rd device to get the SPM, and there were not apps to integrate all those pieces at the time, so it was ballpark-ish, or spreadsheet analysis with aggregated data streams.

    Now, Garmin gives me reasonable estimates of all that stuff – pace, SPM, HR, distance, duration – time-integrated. That’s pretty useful, and a time-saver. On top of that, it replaces the wristwatch I’ve worn most of my life (for a while in the 1970s, I carried a pocket watch, because my job was destructive to wristwatches of the era). Though I'm not competing any more, performance improvement is still part of the fun, for me.

    I do use Garmin’s calorie estimates for some exercises, where I don’t have an estimating source I consider more likely to be accurate. That’s a handy side-benefit, but not the key reason I appreciate having such a device.
    I understand that we’re all different people with different priorities, but the seeming common idea on MFP that the main point of these devices is calorie estimates and step counts . . . that’s really alien to me.

    I was speaking about myself really. I was never into running, just weights and walking, It was steps I was after and calorie total. Trackers are useless for weights and as you say the calorie total was not accurate and neither were the steps really, so for me it was kind of a pointless device. I was after it more for health I guess that fitness, we'll not even talk about sleep tracking which ended up giving me insomnia.
    edited May 24
  • cupcakesandproteinshakescupcakesandproteinshakes Member Posts: 912 Member Member Posts: 912 Member
    I’ve never had one. I’m not a data geek at all. I’ve gained lost and maintained weight without one. I also don’t use mfp as intended though so i don’t eat back my exercise calories.
    I think I would find trackers annoying. Each to their own.
  • hiparihipari Member, Premium Posts: 1,271 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,271 Member
    I currently use my Fitbit purely as a wristwatch, but intend to return to some of the tracking features post-pregnancy. I don’t have any other wristwatch and really like the way my Fitbit looks, so I’m happily ”stuck” with it even now.

    The only downside why I’d maybe prefer a similar-looking wristwatch is that there doesn’t seem to be any way of telling the app I’m pregnant, and pregnancy is messing up every statistic: my resting HR is through the roof (normal for pregnancy), my sleeping patterns are messed up because of nightly bathroom breaks, my ability to do intense exercise is reduced to almost 0 and so on.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 10,697 Member Member Posts: 10,697 Member
    dave_in_ni wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    In a way, the question doesn’t even compute, for me. I’ve long used a HRM, GPS tracker, and sometimes specialized devices to collect performance-related metrics. That was before mass-market multi-function fitness trackers were available at all.

    Now that I have a Garmin that integrates all of those, plus automates some estimates I used to do more laboriously (like resting heart rate), plus gives me estimates I didn’t have before at all, I love my Garmin. That’s true even though its all-day calorie estimate is *wildly* inaccurate for me (I don’t synch it to MFP because of that).

    I used to use a Polar HRM, and correlate it with pace/distance/time data from my Concept 2 rowing machine, tracking hoped-for things like lowered HR at the same pace, for example. I also had a Garmin (Forerunner) that would do pace/distance tracking for on-water rowing. I would use that data in junction with the Polar HR data, as well as for evaluating different technical changes or strategies. (Example: If we do 500m max-effort rowing pieces, is our double faster at 25 spm or 30 spm? (If you’re thinking 30 is always faster . . . it isn’t, because technique can degrade at higher spm.)) It took a 3rd device to get the SPM, and there were not apps to integrate all those pieces at the time, so it was ballpark-ish, or spreadsheet analysis with aggregated data streams.

    Now, Garmin gives me reasonable estimates of all that stuff – pace, SPM, HR, distance, duration – time-integrated. That’s pretty useful, and a time-saver. On top of that, it replaces the wristwatch I’ve worn most of my life (for a while in the 1970s, I carried a pocket watch, because my job was destructive to wristwatches of the era). Though I'm not competing any more, performance improvement is still part of the fun, for me.

    I do use Garmin’s calorie estimates for some exercises, where I don’t have an estimating source I consider more likely to be accurate. That’s a handy side-benefit, but not the key reason I appreciate having such a device.
    I understand that we’re all different people with different priorities, but the seeming common idea on MFP that the main point of these devices is calorie estimates and step counts . . . that’s really alien to me.

    I was speaking about myself really. I was never into running, just weights and walking, It was steps I was after and calorie total. Trackers are useless for weights and as you say the calorie total was not accurate and neither were the steps really, so for me it was kind of a pointless device. I was after it more for health I guess that fitness, we'll not even talk about sleep tracking which ended up giving me insomnia.

    I love my Garmin in general, but also I find it pretty useful lifting weights in the gym. It knows whether I'm doing benches, squats, or whatever, and it counts reps for me. There's an up and a down button so when I did 12 and it only saw 11, it's quick and easy to fix. I like having a log of what I did. The web site gives me a graph of reps and weight for every lift, over time, to show me if I'm making progress and if I'm covering all my bases.

    This time of year my main exercise is cycling. I have the Garmin tail light on my bike, the one with radar, so when I'm riding, my watch starts beeping and vibrating to let me know wherever there's a car behind me. Don't even have to look at it, if it's freaking out it's because there's a car approaching; if the car is going too fast the watch screen goes red, and the light starts flashing to get the driver's attention. I love my Garmin.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 10,697 Member Member Posts: 10,697 Member
    I don't use it for steps or calories though.
  • joryrheannejoryrheanne Member Posts: 49 Member Member Posts: 49 Member
    I had the Fitbit charge hr 6 years ago and replaced it with the Fitbit inspire in the last year. I wear mine all the time and only take it off to shower or charge. Although it may not always be precisely accurate I enjoy keeping track of my steps and sleep. It has became a must have for me kind of like my phone.
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