Are you an ego lifter?

ninerbuff
ninerbuff Posts: 46,187 Member
I see it all the time in the gym. A guy will go to the leg press, pile on 10 or more 45's on the sled, only to do a slight knee bend. Do I care? Yes for one main reason.....................I could have used a couple of those 45's instead that were closer to me rather than go hunt some down and displace them from the other side of the gym (an issue we have at my gym due to getting another leg press machine).
I'm NOT that strong a person. I don't squat over 225lbs, bench press over 185lbs or deadlift over 225lbs. I look like I could lift a lot more, but it's more important to me for full range of motion and form. Don't get me wrong. Back in the day, I lifted more than I really could correctly to fulfill my ego as well, but over time realized that it really wasn't doing anything to improve my physique.
Guys are notorious for lifting WAY MORE than they could really handle for actual REAL REPS. Just to get a little attention and admiration, but in reality most serious lifters know they are just ego lifting and brag about it to people unfamiliar with actually working out.
I know you guys have stories. Let's hear 'em.





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Replies

  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 7,810 Member
    steveko89 wrote: »
    Biggest injury risk using full ROM is a bruised ego.

    QFT
  • Speakeasy76
    Speakeasy76 Posts: 960 Member
    The college and high-school kids are now back in the gym (yay), so I see this now a TON! I just keep thinking that these kids are going to end up with joint and muscle problems way before they should.

    I'm dealing with a strained glute muscle (thought it was hamstring, now think it's low glute), and I admit it is has been TOUGH to put my ego aside to lower the weight so I can rehab it and not make it worse.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 40,888 Member
    No, I'm too old and have too many nagging little things from beating my body up when I was younger. Full ROM and time under tension are more important to me than piling on plates.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,187 Member
    The college and high-school kids are now back in the gym (yay), so I see this now a TON! I just keep thinking that these kids are going to end up with joint and muscle problems way before they should.

    I'm dealing with a strained glute muscle (thought it was hamstring, now think it's low glute), and I admit it is has been TOUGH to put my ego aside to lower the weight so I can rehab it and not make it worse.






    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,969 Member
    There was a time when I started lifting that I tried to see what my 1RM max "equivalent" was which was based on 3-5RMs wc was w/in the top 5% for men my age/wt based on charts and certain public databases.

    However, after sustaining a back injury doing squats improperly (and not even while attempting to lift a heavy wt for me), I stopped doing that after my recovery and only lifted at around 70-75% of my estimated max for general physical conditioning since then.

    BTW, I never inconvenienced anyone by hogging plates bc I do all of my lifting at home alone.
  • DD265
    DD265 Posts: 467 Member
    I am amazed that the gym in the first video permitted him to stack weights like that. He spent so long fannying around that they could easily have put a stop to it.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,187 Member
    DD265 wrote: »
    I am amazed that the gym in the first video permitted him to stack weights like that. He spent so long fannying around that they could easily have put a stop to it.
    Yeah, wouldn't happen at my gym. That shows the ineptitude of the staff NOT paying attention to people doing dumb things in the gym. We don't allow people to dance on treadmills (to keep others around safe) or attempt dangerous lifting exercises like overstacking machines.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • SnifterPug
    SnifterPug Posts: 746 Member
    Oh goodness me, no. And my coach is very protective of my back as we put a lot of volume in, and insists I wear a belt for anything above 70% of max. So you will see me wearing a great big weight belt while deadlifting what looks like not very much at all.
  • DoubleG2
    DoubleG2 Posts: 85 Member
    Right before COVID lock down, there was a dude who was clearly an inexperienced lifter slap two 45s on either end of the bar and attempt to squat. It did not end well. Thankfully, the safety bars were in place or it might have been call an ambulance time.
  • deputy_randolph
    deputy_randolph Posts: 941 Member
    Last week, I knew not to add more weight to bench. I knew that I should stay at that weight and bang out the reps. Sometimes, I do what I want and slapped on more weight and had to break up the set. This week I dropped back to 130....aaaaand did all my reps. I just needed a little ego boost with big plates to get me through my slump.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,081 Member
    No . I use auto regulation so my intensities are governed by what is appropriate for that session.

    My gym doesn't really have ego lifters and is well equipped.

    Those who might have tendencies towards inappropriate intensities pick the brains of one of bull's of the gym.
  • nossmf
    nossmf Posts: 3,471 Member
    edited June 2021
    I used to be an ego lifter, seeking that ever higher 1RM. That all came to a screeching halt the day I benched 285 for the first (and last) time at BW 190. I had been adding weight every single week that summer, soreness in my joints be darned, because I wanted to catch up to the guys around me I saw lifting 315 for reps. Absolutely had the blinders on my eyes, ignoring the fact these guys also outweighed me by a good 50 pounds, much of it muscle.

    Did I complete the rep? Yes, I did, tearing something in both shoulders in the process. Luckily avoided surgery, but rest and rehab cost me six months of lifting, and another year before I was again lifting any appreciably heavy weights. These days I don't go below sets of five (except for deadlift, where my form breaks down if I do too many reps, so I do triples).

    I do admit to including the leg press every couple weeks in my routine, and it remains an ego pleaser for me because I can lift a ton of weight. (Ok, technically half a ton, but still...) But I make sure my legs go to 90 degrees, and it's only every other leg day, where squat is still the king of my routine.
  • nossmf
    nossmf Posts: 3,471 Member
    The biggest case of "ego lifting" I observe in the gym is the incorrect use of spotters on the bench press. I was taught that a spotter is there "just in case"... if the spotter actually has to exert a single muscle to help complete a rep, the set is done. (Negative reps are a different situation.)

    But there's been more than one time I've been at the gym and witnessed somebody load up the bench press, have a spotter ready, lower the weight... and the spotter has to almost do an awkward deadlift to help raise the weight. Yet instead of racking the weight, the bencher goes for another rep, again requiring serious help up... and a third rep... While it's possible the goal was negative reps, controlling a heavier-than-able weight on the way down, I doubt it, as the bencher lowered the weight super fast, not in a controlled fashion.
  • naomi8888
    naomi8888 Posts: 519 Member
    I actually see people doing this in my Body Pump classes but didn't know there was a term for it.
  • SabAteNine
    SabAteNine Posts: 1,866 Member
    I used to see that quite often (though never at the magnitude of the first video - WOW), mostly on the leg press and calf machine, sometimes the bench press when there was a bro gang which somehow got to wake up early.

    Never got the point of it - it's not like barely jerking the thing while ungghhh-ing out loud is going to bring more gains than proper reps with a proper weight.

    I usually stuck in the hypertrophy range, especially with big compound lifts, so that thankfully never got to be a personal issue. There's formulas to derive the 1RM even from sets of 8-10 reps.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,187 Member
    edited June 2021
    nossmf wrote: »
    The biggest case of "ego lifting" I observe in the gym is the incorrect use of spotters on the bench press. I was taught that a spotter is there "just in case"... if the spotter actually has to exert a single muscle to help complete a rep, the set is done. (Negative reps are a different situation.)

    But there's been more than one time I've been at the gym and witnessed somebody load up the bench press, have a spotter ready, lower the weight... and the spotter has to almost do an awkward deadlift to help raise the weight. Yet instead of racking the weight, the bencher goes for another rep, again requiring serious help up... and a third rep... While it's possible the goal was negative reps, controlling a heavier-than-able weight on the way down, I doubt it, as the bencher lowered the weight super fast, not in a controlled fashion.
    With most negatives though (if the intention was that) the spotter should immediately pull the bar up on the concentric movement because it's NOT the focus. If a rep on the concentric is difficult for the spotter to pull, then the bencher is pretty much done on that set.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • MikePfirrman
    MikePfirrman Posts: 3,112 Member
    edited June 2021
    I have no ego when I lift at all. I load and deload my plates within minutes. But I'm not a real heavy lifter either. Aand yes, form is much more important to me.

    When I got back into lifting around 13 years ago, I saw a guy decide he was going to use the 100 lb dumbbells. His arm (or might have been his elbow) snapped in half. Was awful to see. I had to look away. He was going to the side with the weight after he benched it. Made absolutely zero sense to be using dumbbells to bench and not a bar, especially not knowing how to safely move them to the ground -- not going off to the side like he tried!

    That would cure anyone from being an idiot with too heavy of dumbbells.
  • ajlmfp22
    ajlmfp22 Posts: 54 Member
    No. I've learned the hard way that sacrificing proper form and risking injury just for some clout isn't worth it.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 7,358 Member
    nossmf wrote: »
    The biggest case of "ego lifting" I observe in the gym is the incorrect use of spotters on the bench press. I was taught that a spotter is there "just in case"... if the spotter actually has to exert a single muscle to help complete a rep, the set is done. (Negative reps are a different situation.)

    But there's been more than one time I've been at the gym and witnessed somebody load up the bench press, have a spotter ready, lower the weight... and the spotter has to almost do an awkward deadlift to help raise the weight. Yet instead of racking the weight, the bencher goes for another rep, again requiring serious help up... and a third rep... While it's possible the goal was negative reps, controlling a heavier-than-able weight on the way down, I doubt it, as the bencher lowered the weight super fast, not in a controlled fashion.

    I had some accidents that could have been ended ugly doing bench press. But I was the only person that that accommodation gym, where the whole kit was completely *kitten*, btw. Once I just about got the weight up. It was lower than previous time. But then could not hold it and the weight went down to my chest. Nearly. I just about managed to break it. But then it sat there and I was underneath. Ouch! Afterwards I did bench presses inside the squat rack even though I lost full range of motion that way.

    Another time I was done, put bar back into holders, and for some reasons my hands remained underneath the bar when it fell down behind me. (like I said: *kitten* equipment) I guess I'm lucky that I'm rather flexible.