Eating with allergies

Okay, I'm allergic to lactose and yeast. Lactose is easy to substitute, but because yeast is an unusual allergy to have, it's really difficult to find substitutes for it. This means obvious things like bread are off limits, but also things like certain types of sausages and meats, as well as over ripe fruits and veggies, so I have to use my fruits and veggies the same day I buy them or a few days after before it's best before date. I obviously have to avoid fast food like the plague and I only drink tea and water (because fizzy makes me burp like when my yeast allergy flares up and I am not going down that path again)

Most of what I eat is meat from the butcher's (because it's not got artificial yeast put into it like the superstore stuff) and vegetables which I'll keep as fresh as possible for as long as possible and typically will go shopping every couple of days for both. I cook 99% of my meals and don't often snack unless my dad brings me some chocolate or something, but very rarely because it's more expensive than regular chocolate and money's tight.

Replies

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,584 Member
    Sounds like you've got a good handle on what you need to do :)

    It does sound rather inconvenient to have to shop every few days, but if it works for you, disregard the following.

    I stock up on meat when it is on sale and freeze what I'm not going to use right away. When fruit like berries are not in season, I buy it frozen. It's generally cheaper this way as well. I'm not a huge fan of frozen veggies, but peas and corn are fine frozen IMO.

    That's really interesting about over ripe fruits and veggies producing yeast! Is it true for all produce? For example, I stock up on carrots and cabbage when they are on sale in March for St. Patrick's Day, and they last for months in the frig.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,407 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Sounds like you've got a good handle on what you need to do :)

    It does sound rather inconvenient to have to shop every few days, but if it works for you, disregard the following.

    I stock up on meat when it is on sale and freeze what I'm not going to use right away. When fruit like berries are not in season, I buy it frozen. It's generally cheaper this way as well. I'm not a huge fan of frozen veggies, but peas and corn are fine frozen IMO.

    That's really interesting about over ripe fruits and veggies producing yeast! Is it true for all produce? For example, I stock up on carrots and cabbage when they are on sale in March for St. Patrick's Day, and they last for months in the frig.


    It seems more likely that they are providing a hospitable environment for wild yeast than that they are "producing" yeast. There's yeast in the air all around us.
  • MargaretYakoda
    MargaretYakoda Posts: 1,945 Member
    I feel your pain. I’m allergic to black pepper. Which makes restaurants nearly impossible.

    And now I’m also lactose and gluten intolerant, also. I just pack a bag whenever I go anywhere. 🤪
  • ElizabethHanrahan
    ElizabethHanrahan Posts: 101 Member
    You can make quick breads with gluten free flours (less chance of yeast contamination) and baking powder. Be sure to stay away from the melon family (they harbor molds on the skins).
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,584 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Sounds like you've got a good handle on what you need to do :)

    It does sound rather inconvenient to have to shop every few days, but if it works for you, disregard the following.

    I stock up on meat when it is on sale and freeze what I'm not going to use right away. When fruit like berries are not in season, I buy it frozen. It's generally cheaper this way as well. I'm not a huge fan of frozen veggies, but peas and corn are fine frozen IMO.

    That's really interesting about over ripe fruits and veggies producing yeast! Is it true for all produce? For example, I stock up on carrots and cabbage when they are on sale in March for St. Patrick's Day, and they last for months in the frig.


    It seems more likely that they are providing a hospitable environment for wild yeast than that they are "producing" yeast. There's yeast in the air all around us.

    Ok, that kind of makes sense. I'm aware of yeast in the air, hence bread that can be made without adding yeast directly.

    But is there wild yeast in the refrigerator?
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,407 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Sounds like you've got a good handle on what you need to do :)

    It does sound rather inconvenient to have to shop every few days, but if it works for you, disregard the following.

    I stock up on meat when it is on sale and freeze what I'm not going to use right away. When fruit like berries are not in season, I buy it frozen. It's generally cheaper this way as well. I'm not a huge fan of frozen veggies, but peas and corn are fine frozen IMO.

    That's really interesting about over ripe fruits and veggies producing yeast! Is it true for all produce? For example, I stock up on carrots and cabbage when they are on sale in March for St. Patrick's Day, and they last for months in the frig.


    It seems more likely that they are providing a hospitable environment for wild yeast than that they are "producing" yeast. There's yeast in the air all around us.

    Ok, that kind of makes sense. I'm aware of yeast in the air, hence bread that can be made without adding yeast directly.

    But is there wild yeast in the refrigerator?

    I think you'd have to test to be sure, but it seems likely. The air in the refrigerator came from the kitchen, and I can get a starter growing from nothing but flour and water in my kitchen. But if the refrigerator is appropriately cool, the yeast activity should be slowed (not stopped -- some bread doughs get a slow rise in the refrigerator).
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,407 Member
    You can make quick breads with gluten free flours (less chance of yeast contamination) and baking powder. Be sure to stay away from the melon family (they harbor molds on the skins).

    Gluten and yeast have nothing to do with each other. Gluten is a protein, and yeast lives on carbs. So I don't understand why gluten free flour would have less chance of "yeast contamination."
  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,846 Member
    You can make quick breads with gluten free flours (less chance of yeast contamination) and baking powder. Be sure to stay away from the melon family (they harbor molds on the skins).

    Gluten and yeast have nothing to do with each other. Gluten is a protein, and yeast lives on carbs. So I don't understand why gluten free flour would have less chance of "yeast contamination."

    I suspect the point is not to use yeast at all in a quick bread. Such breads are risen using baking powder/bicarbonate of soda (baking soda/cream of tartar in various proportions.

    I don’t think there’s any suggestion that gluten free flour has anything to do with yeast.

    Gluten free - one allergy - which is not even mentioned by the OP so not a requirement.

    Yeast - a separate allergy which is relevant to the OP.
  • Athijade
    Athijade Posts: 2,807 Member
    Allergies can be tough. I have a soy allergy and have to look at every single label because that stuff is hidden where you would least expect it. I also have a medical condition that is food sensitive so I have to look out for that as well. Luckily that is in a good place these days, but I remember having a total breakdown in the grocery store because I couldn't find something safe to eat.