Nocturnal Leg Cramps

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Replies

  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,210 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    Yes, I am T2Dm and know I am likely to get them if I eat more than my usual number of carbs (150g per day is my target)

    I too get them from a sudden spike in carbs.. which makes sense, since carbs tie up water in the body (in the form of glycogen). Try increasing your water intake a lot when eating more carbs than usual. Also avoid sleeping on your side on those days, since it's much easier for the hamstrings & calves to contract in that position. Sleeping on your back lengthens the hams & calves, making it harder for them to seize up.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,171 Member
    edited October 2021
    Cherimoose wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    Yes, I am T2Dm and know I am likely to get them if I eat more than my usual number of carbs (150g per day is my target)

    I too get them from a sudden spike in carbs.. which makes sense, since carbs tie up water in the body (in the form of glycogen). Try increasing your water intake a lot when eating more carbs than usual. Also avoid sleeping on your side on those days, since it's much easier for the hamstrings & calves to contract in that position. Sleeping on your back lengthens the hams & calves, making it harder for them to seize up.

    I usually sleep on my stomach but I hang my toes off the end of the bed (pointing to the floor) for that exact reason. It also makes it easier to press the foot against the footboard if I do get a charley horse.
  • ridiculous59
    ridiculous59 Posts: 2,816 Member
    Cherimoose wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    Yes, I am T2Dm and know I am likely to get them if I eat more than my usual number of carbs (150g per day is my target)

    I too get them from a sudden spike in carbs.. which makes sense, since carbs tie up water in the body (in the form of glycogen). Try increasing your water intake a lot when eating more carbs than usual. Also avoid sleeping on your side on those days, since it's much easier for the hamstrings & calves to contract in that position. Sleeping on your back lengthens the hams & calves, making it harder for them to seize up.

    Talk about timely information! I haven't had a nocturnal cramp in months (see earlier post about a regular stretching routine). But yesterday I bought a tub of Breyers chocolate truffle ice cream because a family member is temporarily staying at our house who has a real sweet tooth. Does anyone know that scene in the movie Christmas Story where Ralphie is eating mashed potatoes? That was me with the ice cream last night. I fell off the wagon and I fell hard. I wallowed in that tub of chocolate truffle ice cream. And guess who woke up with a cramp last night? So I'd say that for me, there is definitely a connection between a sudden spike in carbs and a muscle cramp. I've been at this weight-loss game for several years but it just goes to show that there's always something new to learn.
  • Cindy01Louisiana
    Cindy01Louisiana Posts: 302 Member
    I do not know how to keep them at bay or prevent them. My feet and lower legs have a tendency to cramp at night. I've tried supplements, etc. Nothing prevents them for me.

    What does relax the spasm VERY quickly for me is heat. If it's a bad cramp, I immediately take my rice heating pad to the microwave and, when it's hot, I try to wrap it around the cramped muscle and hold it tight. It's usually 100% relaxed within 2-3 minutes.

    If it's a mild cramp, I turn on the electric heating pad next to my bed and wrap the muscle in that. Takes longer to heat up and by the time it's hot, the cramp is completely relaxed.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,876 Member
    I used to get them a lot when I was trying to do a very low sodium diet for hypertension. It was too low for my activity level and sweating while exercising in the desert heat. Upped my sodium and that helped but I would still get them occasionally. Started taking a magnesium citrate supplement about an hour before bed and I rarely get them anymore...actually can't remember the last time. I also eat a lot of high potassium foods.
  • natasor1
    natasor1 Posts: 271 Member
    I do have them too, very often, as often as 10-13 times per night. What helps?.. Make sure you have all micros in good supply: iron 40-65 mg a day, Potassium 5000mg, Magnesium (not what doctor recommends, they afraid to give you more than average. Try 1000mg a day, Sodium ( just chewing few salt crystals before bed). Calcium 1000mg
    About carbs? It sounds ridiculous with T2D. Think not 150g , but 50 g a day. You will feel much better.
  • Jthanmyfitnesspal
    Jthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 3,521 Member
    Yes! Sucks, doesn't it?

    I've done all the countermeasures, too. I take a magnesium, calcium, zinc supplement at bedtime (plus a multivitamin for good measure). Things are worse when I'm particularly sore from exercising that day, for sure. Yes, I've been woken from a deep sleep and had to get out of bed to stretch it out. Inner thigh is definitely the most common spot, although I've gotten them in my feet as well.

    If you figure out what helps, let me know!
  • lorib642
    lorib642 Posts: 1,942 Member
    edited October 2021
    I am on a keto diet 30 g carbs I take magnesium in the evening and drink boullian for sodium. Do you think it could be electrolytes? Also potassium can help but I don't add that
  • mikhnpaitsmum
    mikhnpaitsmum Posts: 119 Member
    I was getting them. I find doing daily streches for my sciatic nerve helps greatly. A tennis ball or softball(bigger than a baseball) wedged under the buttcheek on the side where the leg is sore helps too.
    And yes, I take magnesium like everyone else says.
  • Jthanmyfitnesspal
    Jthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 3,521 Member
    I was getting them. I find doing daily streches for my sciatic nerve helps greatly. A tennis ball or softball(bigger than a baseball) wedged under the buttcheek on the side where the leg is sore helps too.
    And yes, I take magnesium like everyone else says.

    Yes! I call this "ball against a wall." I like it better than rolling because you can control the pressure better and can apply it to everywhere from your shoulders to your IT band.
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,842 Member
    I try to do the stretches soon after the workout while muscles still warmed up.
    Get enough K & Mg.
    Eat after exercise earlier rather than later.

    And I've come to doing a quick roll with Biofreeze on specific muscles when it still happens, then walk around the house and back in bed. Gone.
  • peggy_polenta
    peggy_polenta Posts: 309 Member
    vivmom2014 wrote: »
    People have reported relief from leg cramps at night by putting a bar of soap under the bottom sheet at the end of the bed. Even if doctors consider it placebo effect, if it helps, it helps! You could try that, or at least look up some articles about it.

    thats for restless leg syndrome
  • KimberlyMaguire_91
    KimberlyMaguire_91 Posts: 4 Member
    edited December 2021
    I understand your concern about cramping on a regular basis. I had a similar experience years ago. It's both concerning and irritating. You will be unable to do anything, nothing at all. Given that you are not looking for medications. A chiro can be of great help if you need immediate relief. If you're looking for a practical way to treat your leg cramps, consulting with a chiro might be a good idea. This should be an option to consider. Instead of recommending a slew of pills and tablets, a chiropractor can assist your body in healing on its own.

    Edit: link removed by MFP mod
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 7,379 Member
    Utter nonsense. I’m sincerely sorry you didn’t get relief, but others of us have had success. Granted, n=1, but if one of these suggestions makes OP in this post an n=2, then hallelujah.
  • elisa123gal
    elisa123gal Posts: 4,286 Member
    I drink more water... take magnesium at bedtime really really helps.. and when my legs get real stressed. I get a massage and it works wonders. But really.. all three put me right.