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Does your doctor comment on your weight?

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Replies

  • J72FIT
    J72FIT Posts: 5,932 Member
    edited November 2021

    Moved...
  • Mellouk89
    Mellouk89 Posts: 469 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    A coworker of mine is 5'7 260lbs, her doctor told him that his healthy weight is 200. We're talking about a dude who doesn't workout.

    I don't know if she said that to give him a reasonable goal or she really thinks 200lbs is his healthy weight. Maybe she doesn't think he can lose the weight. Who knows.

    Now the guy thinks he is large framed and that 200 is what he should shoot for.

    Just an anecdote.

    Eh, people misinterpret or misreport what their doctor says all the time. I can totally see the doctor saying try to lose to at least 200 as an attainable goal and the truth is (a) it would be a healthier weight and a huge improvement, even if they just maintained there, and (b) very often once you start losing weight you adjust the goal weight once you are there and see you could still lose more/it wasn't the end of the world to be dieting/you aren't as skinny as you assumed at the weight.

    I never get why people get so focused on what the goal weight is or should be. Mine was 120-125 because I had been that weight as an adult and liked how I looked at it, but if I'd started with 140 (just into my healthy weight range) or even 170 (not obese), it wouldn't have made my process much different.

    Also, if my doctor had said "if you would just lose enough to get out of the obese range it would probably help with health risk factors," that wouldn't have been untrue.

    No he bragged about his healthy weight being 200 because his doctor said so. He really believes at 200lbs he's not going to have another pound to lose.

    It's possible that he misinterpreted what his doctor said, I can't verify that.

    Another coworker of mine is 5'5 230lbs and he says his healthy weight is 160, even though it's clearly overweight for someone 5'5. It is common with dudes :D
  • Mellouk89
    Mellouk89 Posts: 469 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    A coworker of mine is 5'7 260lbs, her doctor told him that his healthy weight is 200. We're talking about a dude who doesn't workout.

    I don't know if she said that to give him a reasonable goal or she really thinks 200lbs is his healthy weight. Maybe she doesn't think he can lose the weight. Who knows.

    Now the guy thinks he is large framed and that 200 is what he should shoot for.

    Just an anecdote.

    Just for reference this guy is a couple inches taller at 5'9" and a bit heavier than your co-worker's goal of 200 pounds at 208. If the co-worker gets to 200 and and looks like this he's probably okay. If not, he still has some work to do.

    lu0mc2ka0o0q.png

    I said he doesn't workout. And 200lbs lean at 5'9 is incredibly hard to achieve without certain substances.
  • makinlifehappen
    makinlifehappen Posts: 111 Member
    Last year my doc told me my sleep apnea may improve if I wasn't fat.
  • xrj22
    xrj22 Posts: 141 Member
    No, my doctor never mentioned how much weight I had gained over the years. Now, being diagnosed as diabetic, it makes me angry. When my annual A1C results were 8.5, she said unfortunately now you will always be diabetic. Then followed up with would you like to lose weight? It would have been good to know before I passed the point of no return. I would rather you hurt my little feelings and save my life! So I jumped right on the path and have lost 47 pounds in less than 8 months, my A1C is 5.6, I exercise every day and haven't felt this well in 7 years. And best of all, no diabetes meds; cut my blood pressure meds in half and may end up off them altogether. So yes, doctors should say something about weight!


    I can't believe that any doctor told you that you would always be diabetic. That is just untrue. In fact the research shows that MOST diabetics will no longer be diabetic if they can get into the desirable weight range and stay there. I have known many who have seen dramatic improvements with weight lost and improved diet even if they remain above "optimal" weight.

    I do think there is a bit of a quandry about whether to try weight loss first or whether/when to start the meds right away and then see if you can wean off once weight loss is achieved or sustained.
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    xrj22 wrote: »
    No, my doctor never mentioned how much weight I had gained over the years. Now, being diagnosed as diabetic, it makes me angry. When my annual A1C results were 8.5, she said unfortunately now you will always be diabetic. Then followed up with would you like to lose weight? It would have been good to know before I passed the point of no return. I would rather you hurt my little feelings and save my life! So I jumped right on the path and have lost 47 pounds in less than 8 months, my A1C is 5.6, I exercise every day and haven't felt this well in 7 years. And best of all, no diabetes meds; cut my blood pressure meds in half and may end up off them altogether. So yes, doctors should say something about weight!


    I can't believe that any doctor told you that you would always be diabetic. That is just untrue. In fact the research shows that MOST diabetics will no longer be diabetic if they can get into the desirable weight range and stay there. I have known many who have seen dramatic improvements with weight lost and improved diet even if they remain above "optimal" weight.

    I do think there is a bit of a quandry about whether to try weight loss first or whether/when to start the meds right away and then see if you can wean off once weight loss is achieved or sustained.

    This isn’t valid. Many diabetics can achieve normal blood glucose range with diet weight loss, but they will never recover the ability to consume large amounts of carbs without a blood sugar spike. The initial insulin response which keeps sugar level is usually gone and stays gone.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,762 Member
    Yes exactly.

    Unless it is gestational diabetes - yes you are always going to be diabetic.

    You can sometimes lose weight such that you need less or no medication and can control your blood sugar levels on diet alone - but that isnt becoming non diabetic.
    It is becoming diet control only.
  • MaggieGirl135
    MaggieGirl135 Posts: 693 Member
    By no means am I am overly knowledgeable about this, but I do believe that if you have/had gestational diabetes, you have a higher probability of developing T2 diabetes later in life. Meaning, although you may no longer have diabetes following the birth, you will need to be aware of needed behaviors/monitoring to ensure it does not come back.
  • Mom24_2021
    Mom24_2021 Posts: 42 Member
    My doctors have not brought it up but when I ask if it would help they have all said a resounding “yes”. I know they run a business so I’m okay that I have to ask to get an answer but they should tell everyone these things regardless of what the reaction would be if they have an illness, disease or physical complications that could be made better or resolved by losing weight. As long as they say it respectfully, it’s not personal, it’s their job to help you get better.
  • Twistarella
    Twistarella Posts: 17 Member
    I often thought about this. I have been as low as 103 and as high as 205 as an adult and never had a medical professional say anything to me ever.
  • KL1887
    KL1887 Posts: 72 Member
    My gp’s (primary care doctors) have commented on my weight loss and asked how I’ve accomplished it and maintain it knowing I’m not able to exercise. They never had any comments or possible solutions when I broached my medical conditions and the subsequent weight gain it all causes.
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,132 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    A coworker of mine is 5'7 260lbs, her doctor told him that his healthy weight is 200. We're talking about a dude who doesn't workout.

    I don't know if she said that to give him a reasonable goal or she really thinks 200lbs is his healthy weight. Maybe she doesn't think he can lose the weight. Who knows.

    Now the guy thinks he is large framed and that 200 is what he should shoot for.

    Just an anecdote.

    Just for reference this guy is a couple inches taller at 5'9" and a bit heavier than your co-worker's goal of 200 pounds at 208. If the co-worker gets to 200 and and looks like this he's probably okay. If not, he still has some work to do.

    lu0mc2ka0o0q.png

    That's an elite level physique. The number of 5' 7" dudes walking around at 200 lbs and a healthy body fat % is extraordinarily low.