OMAD and GERD

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Last year I took antibiotics for a week following which I started to get the feeling that something was constantly in my throat. It's only got worse over time. I'm constantly drinking water and eating as it provides a minute or two of relief. My doctor thinks I have silent reflux/GERD and prescribed me strong antacids which from what I've read, cause more harm than good. My question is, has anyone had this problem and successfully got rid of it naturally, through weight loss and diet? I've read a few stories about people who started fasting and only eating one meal a day and not only lost weight but reversed alot of health conditions including GERD. I am starting OMAD today and hope it reduces my weight and symptoms coz I am pretty miserable right now 😩
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Replies

  • claireychn074
    claireychn074 Posts: 1,453 Member
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    Nope, been on v high dose of omeprazole for 8 years. I am aware of the side effects and have tried reducing it, but my reflux causes asthma. The longer term side effects of PPIs might not be great, but they’re better than having an asthma attack! I know that GERD can be influenced by what you eat and how often and you may find some experimentation helps. So I have to eat every 2-3 hrs to hold off acid, don’t have huge meals, and I’m careful about how much fat I eat. I know some food is going to set it off (like raw onion - bye bye coleslaw) and I can’t eat before bed / lying down. Ultimately having untreated GERD can also cause nasty long term side effects, so maybe keep a food impact diary which will help you to see any patterns over time. Only you can decide whether to medicate it, but for me personally I don’t feel I have any choice.
  • DiscoveringLisa
    DiscoveringLisa Posts: 112 Member
    Options
    Nope, been on v high dose of omeprazole for 8 years. I am aware of the side effects and have tried reducing it, but my reflux causes asthma. The longer term side effects of PPIs might not be great, but they’re better than having an asthma attack! I know that GERD can be influenced by what you eat and how often and you may find some experimentation helps. So I have to eat every 2-3 hrs to hold off acid, don’t have huge meals, and I’m careful about how much fat I eat. I know some food is going to set it off (like raw onion - bye bye coleslaw) and I can’t eat before bed / lying down. Ultimately having untreated GERD can also cause nasty long term side effects, so maybe keep a food impact diary which will help you to see any patterns over time. Only you can decide whether to medicate it, but for me personally I don’t feel I have any choice.

    Keeping a food diary is a good idea as I notice that sometimes it completely disappears for days and then comes back with avengence. I wish I knew what to do and when to keep it from reappearing. I've not eaten at all today but it's not helped. I guess it's just going to be trial and error.
  • musicfan68
    musicfan68 Posts: 1,140 Member
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    Eating less and eating better, noting which foods give me heartburn has helped me get rid of my GERD. I can't eat sugary things, chocolate, tomato sauce, alcohol. When I eat these things, I almost instantly get heartburn. Also eating less has helped a lot also.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 33,066 Member
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    Since many people with GERD/reflux find the symptoms to be worse after large meals, and OMAD is inherently going to concentrate the same amount of food in a smaller timespan . . . why OMAD?

    Yes, that's a way some people find it easier to limit their total calories eaten, so they lose weight. OMAD (or any kind of intermittent fasting (IF)) is not the only way to lose weight (by far not). It may not be the most suitable for someone with active reflux/GERD.

    Yes, some people find they have fewer problems with GERD/reflux symptoms after weight loss. Not everyone who loses weight experiences that, though. Some thin people -whether always thin or formerly fat - have GERD/reflux.

    My reflux and heartburn turned out to be caused by gallbladder adenomyomatosis (which is different from stones or sludge, less common); it reversed immediately once they took the gallbladder out. Before that, I took prescription meds (esomeprazole/Nexium IIRC) for a few months to relieve the symptoms.

    Has your doctor tested for H. pylori, or ordered any kinds of scans or gastrointestinal tests?
  • DiscoveringLisa
    DiscoveringLisa Posts: 112 Member
    Options
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Since many people with GERD/reflux find the symptoms to be worse after large meals, and OMAD is inherently going to concentrate the same amount of food in a smaller timespan . . . why OMAD?

    Yes, that's a way some people find it easier to limit their total calories eaten, so they lose weight. OMAD (or any kind of intermittent fasting (IF)) is not the only way to lose weight (by far not). It may not be the most suitable for someone with active reflux/GERD.

    Yes, some people find they have fewer problems with GERD/reflux symptoms after weight loss. Not everyone who loses weight experiences that, though. Some thin people -whether always thin or formerly fat - have GERD/reflux.

    My reflux and heartburn turned out to be caused by gallbladder adenomyomatosis (which is different from stones or sludge, less common); it reversed immediately once they took the gallbladder out. Before that, I took prescription meds (esomeprazole/Nexium IIRC) for a few months to relieve the symptoms.

    Has your doctor tested for H. pylori, or ordered any kinds of scans or gastrointestinal tests?

    No, they haven't tested for anything which I find really annoying as I don't mind taking meds if I have to but it seems they want to mask the symptoms without really investigating what the cause is. I may have to bite the bullet and just go back to the doctor and ask for further investigation. I didn't pick OMAD for any other reason other than reading of so many people's positive experiences with it. I'm clutching at straws really. There's too much contrary info out there, I don't know what to do for the best.
  • DiscoveringLisa
    DiscoveringLisa Posts: 112 Member
    Options
    musicfan68 wrote: »
    Eating less and eating better, noting which foods give me heartburn has helped me get rid of my GERD. I can't eat sugary things, chocolate, tomato sauce, alcohol. When I eat these things, I almost instantly get heartburn. Also eating less has helped a lot also.

    I could definitely clean my diet up a bit more. I've been lazy lately
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 7,970 Member
    edited May 2022
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    I had the GERD From Hell. The kind where you keep sick bags and changes of clothes in the car, and live in fear of barfing in public places and wetting your pants. (Both of which -very very traumatically and very very publicly- happened).

    Weight loss absolutely and definitely helped it disappear.

    I’d say aw yeah, it vanished with the first twenty pounds (which it did, thank God).

    But @AnnPT77 ’s comment gave me pause to consider further .

    I think it was both the weight loss, and being more aware of what I was putting in my mouth. The whole “less of” phenomenon that comes with counting calories probably played a huge part.

    Even now, many many pounds later, if I have a pig out, it’s there in the background, grabbing me by the esophagus to remind me “I’m here and it won’t take much to conjure me back. Be careful.”

    And so I am.

    Because all it takes is one night of gentle burning and sleeplessness to remind me of the many nights I feared I’d choke to death in my sleep, or that the horrible acid had eaten a hole in something precious and irreplaceable in my body.
  • DiscoveringLisa
    DiscoveringLisa Posts: 112 Member
    Options
    I had the GERD From Hell. The kind where you keep sick bags and changes of clothes in the car, and live in fear of barfing in public places and wetting your pants. (Both of which -very very traumatically and very very publicly- happened).

    Weight loss absolutely and definitely helped it disappear.

    I’d say aw yeah, it vanished with the first twenty pounds (which it did, thank God).

    But @AnnPT77 ’s comment gave me pause to consider further .

    I think it was both the weight loss, and being more aware of what I was putting in my mouth. The whole “less of” phenomenon that comes with counting calories probably played a huge part.

    Even now, many many pounds later, if I have a pig out, it’s there in the background, grabbing me by the esophagus to remind me “I’m here and it won’t take much to conjure me back. Be careful.”

    And so I am.

    Because all it takes is one night of gentle burning and sleeplessness to remind me of the many nights I feared I’d choke to death in my sleep, or that the horrible acid had eaten a hole in something precious and irreplaceable in my body.

    I'm so glad you got rid of it, it's completely debilitating
  • healingmysticmelody
    healingmysticmelody Posts: 56 Member
    Options
    Probiotics and prebiotics (pre feeds pro) is what came to my mind and a quick Google search told me I’m not wrong. One specific strain works best Lactobaccilic or something. Lactobacillus, looked it up again. One article mentioned cranberry and adding some cranberry juice to diet. Check the sugar on those. I take a half cup each morning with my fiber powder and it has mor calories than orange juice and they use sugar since cranberry plain is bitter.

    Kefir, yogurts, Lactaid also mentioned as sources other than probiotic pills. Like if you are on the go and don’t have pills.

    I sure hope you get some relief.
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,532 Member
    Options
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Since many people with GERD/reflux find the symptoms to be worse after large meals, and OMAD is inherently going to concentrate the same amount of food in a smaller timespan . . . why OMAD?

    Yes, that's a way some people find it easier to limit their total calories eaten, so they lose weight. OMAD (or any kind of intermittent fasting (IF)) is not the only way to lose weight (by far not). It may not be the most suitable for someone with active reflux/GERD.

    Yes, some people find they have fewer problems with GERD/reflux symptoms after weight loss. Not everyone who loses weight experiences that, though. Some thin people -whether always thin or formerly fat - have GERD/reflux.

    My reflux and heartburn turned out to be caused by gallbladder adenomyomatosis (which is different from stones or sludge, less common); it reversed immediately once they took the gallbladder out. Before that, I took prescription meds (esomeprazole/Nexium IIRC) for a few months to relieve the symptoms.

    Has your doctor tested for H. pylori, or ordered any kinds of scans or gastrointestinal tests?

    No, they haven't tested for anything which I find really annoying as I don't mind taking meds if I have to but it seems they want to mask the symptoms without really investigating what the cause is. I may have to bite the bullet and just go back to the doctor and ask for further investigation. I didn't pick OMAD for any other reason other than reading of so many people's positive experiences with it. I'm clutching at straws really. There's too much contrary info out there, I don't know what to do for the best.

    The best is what you can stick with and doesn't leave you feeling deprived and struggling. All diets work through consuming fewer calories than you burn in a day. I found following the MFP recommended calories worked great (although I chose to aim for more protein than they recommended). I connected a FitBit and consumed most of those calories as well. The math and calorie counting is easy. Dealing with all the emotional aspects as well as digging through all the unnecessary information out there was the hardest part.

    As for your initual question, I am one of the lucky ones where my GERD completely disappeared with weight loss. Less belly fat pushing foods up into the esophagus. This seems to change around the 200 lb mark, for me. There is a higher risk of esophageal cancer with GERD, so it's worth taking a more serious look at it. Talk to your doctor more, ask for investigations. See if there's a chance that the meds could be temporary until you lose a bit of weight.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 28,034 Member
    Options
    Last year I took antibiotics for a week following which I started to get the feeling that something was constantly in my throat. It's only got worse over time. I'm constantly drinking water and eating as it provides a minute or two of relief. My doctor thinks I have silent reflux/GERD and prescribed me strong antacids which from what I've read, cause more harm than good. My question is, has anyone had this problem and successfully got rid of it naturally, through weight loss and diet? I've read a few stories about people who started fasting and only eating one meal a day and not only lost weight but reversed alot of health conditions including GERD. I am starting OMAD today and hope it reduces my weight and symptoms coz I am pretty miserable right now 😩

    My mom manages her silent reflux (in the GERD family; not the same) with diet. She didn't want to take PPIs.

    She found this book very helpful:

    Dropping Acid: The Reflux Diet Cookbook & Cure

    I don't recommend the newer book as I feel it overcomplicates things as one of the authors is GF and the other vegan.

    She also drinks alkaline water. Sometimes, that is the only dietary change with which she is consistent. I can tell that it is beneficial, because without it, she sounds like she has hairballs.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 28,034 Member
    edited May 2022
    Options
    I have GERD and cannot imagine doing OMAD. Big meals distress me. I do much better on multiple small meals.

    Now that I have I lost weight and take DGL, I rarely have issues. Most DGL brands are chewable and include stevia, which I cannot stand, so after some trial and error, settled on either of these brands:

    https://www.iherb.com/pr/nature-s-way-dgl-ultra-75-mg-90-vegan-capsules/91621
    https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B01KC0OKNA (I buy this from Emerson, but assume most do not have a login, so am providing an Amazon link.)
  • DiscoveringLisa
    DiscoveringLisa Posts: 112 Member
    Options
    Probiotics and prebiotics (pre feeds pro) is what came to my mind and a quick Google search told me I’m not wrong. One specific strain works best Lactobaccilic or something. Lactobacillus, looked it up again. One article mentioned cranberry and adding some cranberry juice to diet. Check the sugar on those. I take a half cup each morning with my fiber powder and it has mor calories than orange juice and they use sugar since cranberry plain is bitter.

    Kefir, yogurts, Lactaid also mentioned as sources other than probiotic pills. Like if you are on the go and don’t have pills.

    I sure hope you get some relief.

    Thanks for that. I did actually order some probiotics today as I think the antibiotics I took last year killed my gut bacteria as I've had nothing but problems since
  • 88AViva
    88AViva Posts: 499 Member
    edited May 2022
    Options
    I had developed severe GERD and several years ago ended up in the ER because my throat was completely obstructed due to swelling after repeatedly vomiting. Even found blood in the puke several times and just ignored it until it got so bad I couldn't breathe. I had terrible stress management, eating habits and ate the wrong things and never ate regular meals and at times even forgot to eat at all. I would then allow myself to over caffeinate or drink on an empty stomach.

    Over the years I have learnt the causes and how to manage my GERD. I'm sorry if some of the advice or tips were already mentioned by others because I haven't had a chance to read them all.

    A food diary, just note what you had in rough to have an idea what you ate on the days you ended up with nausea, heartburn or the feeling of a lump in your throat.
    This way you can find a pattern of foods that do not support your gut health and you can avoid these.

    I also make sure to take extra care when I feel that lump sensation in the back of the throat and avoid caffeinated beverages (most often teas and coffees and sodas are acidic) peppermint, chocolate and other GERD causing foods for a few days until it clears.

    Gastritis is often caused by imbalance for some people when they have long periods of no food and then suddenly have a heavy meal for the day, gas develops which trigger your GERD so for some severe cases OMAD may cause those issues. Weight loss helps GERD but sometimes the way you do it actually makes the GERD worse.

    I soothe my stomach with Yakult or yoghurt before meals that I know are spicy or acidic. Prebiotics and Probiotics really do help. And when I'm going through a GERD flare due to bad eating, overeating or stress, I keep a stock of Yakult in the fridge for before my first meal and another at the end of the day. It somehow just works get me back to normal again. Antibiotics mess with your healthy gut balance and often causes flares, I keep pro and prebiotics ready when I have to go on antibiotics just to balance it out.

    Sleeping on my left as much as I can and as often as I can when I'm mindful of my position also helps. My doctor suggested a higher pillow or doubling my pillow when I need to, to avoid acid backing up the throat and worsening that swelling.
    bme6zqr16j7p.jpeg

    Observe your body during the process and if you feel OMAD brings about all the GERD symptoms, try eating smaller regular meals and see if that makes a difference. Sometimes it could also be a specific ingredient that just don't suit you.

    I'm just sharing my experiences, it may not be the exact same for you but the past 8 years I have managed it this way and have never needed any antacids or any other GERD meds. Its a balancing thing for me. I just watch for that feeling of nausea, lump, and bloating and I start adjustments until I feel a 100%). It has become less frequent over the years too. Almost rare.
    jdo40idolag2.jpeg

    Sorry for the book, hopefully something there can be useful 🙂

  • DiscoveringLisa
    DiscoveringLisa Posts: 112 Member
    Options
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Since many people with GERD/reflux find the symptoms to be worse after large meals, and OMAD is inherently going to concentrate the same amount of food in a smaller timespan . . . why OMAD?

    Yes, that's a way some people find it easier to limit their total calories eaten, so they lose weight. OMAD (or any kind of intermittent fasting (IF)) is not the only way to lose weight (by far not). It may not be the most suitable for someone with active reflux/GERD.

    Yes, some people find they have fewer problems with GERD/reflux symptoms after weight loss. Not everyone who loses weight experiences that, though. Some thin people -whether always thin or formerly fat - have GERD/reflux.

    My reflux and heartburn turned out to be caused by gallbladder adenomyomatosis (which is different from stones or sludge, less common); it reversed immediately once they took the gallbladder out. Before that, I took prescription meds (esomeprazole/Nexium IIRC) for a few months to relieve the symptoms.

    Has your doctor tested for H. pylori, or ordered any kinds of scans or gastrointestinal tests?

    No, they haven't tested for anything which I find really annoying as I don't mind taking meds if I have to but it seems they want to mask the symptoms without really investigating what the cause is. I may have to bite the bullet and just go back to the doctor and ask for further investigation. I didn't pick OMAD for any other reason other than reading of so many people's positive experiences with it. I'm clutching at straws really. There's too much contrary info out there, I don't know what to do for the best.

    The best is what you can stick with and doesn't leave you feeling deprived and struggling. All diets work through consuming fewer calories than you burn in a day. I found following the MFP recommended calories worked great (although I chose to aim for more protein than they recommended). I connected a FitBit and consumed most of those calories as well. The math and calorie counting is easy. Dealing with all the emotional aspects as well as digging through all the unnecessary information out there was the hardest part.

    As for your initual question, I am one of the lucky ones where my GERD completely disappeared with weight loss. Less belly fat pushing foods up into the esophagus. This seems to change around the 200 lb mark, for me. There is a higher risk of esophageal cancer with GERD, so it's worth taking a more serious look at it. Talk to your doctor more, ask for investigations. See if there's a chance that the meds could be temporary until you lose a bit of weight.

    I am worried about cancer. I've already had breast cancer, certainly don't want to go back down that road again. Thanks 😊
  • DiscoveringLisa
    DiscoveringLisa Posts: 112 Member
    Options
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Last year I took antibiotics for a week following which I started to get the feeling that something was constantly in my throat. It's only got worse over time. I'm constantly drinking water and eating as it provides a minute or two of relief. My doctor thinks I have silent reflux/GERD and prescribed me strong antacids which from what I've read, cause more harm than good. My question is, has anyone had this problem and successfully got rid of it naturally, through weight loss and diet? I've read a few stories about people who started fasting and only eating one meal a day and not only lost weight but reversed alot of health conditions including GERD. I am starting OMAD today and hope it reduces my weight and symptoms coz I am pretty miserable right now 😩

    My mom manages her silent reflux (in the GERD family; not the same) with diet. She didn't want to take PPIs.

    She found this book very helpful:

    Dropping Acid: The Reflux Diet Cookbook & Cure

    I don't recommend the newer book as I feel it overcomplicates things as one of the authors is GF and the other vegan.

    She also drinks alkaline water. Sometimes, that is the only dietary change with which she is consistent. I can tell that it is beneficial, because without it, she sounds like she has hairballs.

    Thank you, I will look at that book 📖
  • DiscoveringLisa
    DiscoveringLisa Posts: 112 Member
    Options
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I have GERD and cannot imagine doing OMAD. Big meals distress me. I do much better on multiple small meals.

    Now that I have I lost weight and take DGL, I rarely have issues. Most DGL brands are chewable and include stevia, which I cannot stand, so after some trial and error, settled on either of these brands:

    https://www.iherb.com/pr/nature-s-way-dgl-ultra-75-mg-90-vegan-capsules/91621
    https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B01KC0OKNA (I buy this from Emerson, but assume most do not have a login, so am providing an Amazon link.)

    Thanks, I'll try that. Never thought to try licorice. I've been drinking ginger in hot water but it's not really helped
  • DiscoveringLisa
    DiscoveringLisa Posts: 112 Member
    Options
    88AViva wrote: »
    I had developed severe GERD and several years ago ended up in the ER because my throat was completely obstructed due to swelling after repeatedly vomiting. Even found blood in the puke several times and just ignored it until it got so bad I couldn't breathe. I had terrible stress management, eating habits and ate the wrong things and never ate regular meals and at times even forgot to eat at all. I would then allow myself to over caffeinate or drink on an empty stomach.

    Over the years I have learnt the causes and how to manage my GERD. I'm sorry if some of the advice or tips were already mentioned by others because I haven't had a chance to read them all.

    A food diary, just note what you had in rough to have an idea what you ate on the days you ended up with nausea, heartburn or the feeling of a lump in your throat.
    This way you can find a pattern of foods that do not support your gut health and you can avoid these.

    I also make sure to take extra care when I feel that lump sensation in the back of the throat and avoid caffeine, peppermint, chocolate and other GERD causing foods for a few days until it clears.

    Gastritis is often caused by imbalance for some people when they have long periods of no food and then suddenly have a heavy meal for the day, gas develops which trigger your GERD so for some severe cases OMAD may cause those issues. Weight loss helps GERD but sometimes the way you do it actually makes the GERD worse.

    I soothe my stomach with Yakult or yoghurt before meals that I know are spicy or acidic. Prebiotics and Probiotics really do help. And when I'm going through a GERD flare due to bad eating, overeating or stress, I keep a stock of Yakult in the fridge for before my first meal and another at the end of the day. It somehow just works get me back to normal again.

    Sleeping on my left as much as I can and as often as I can when I'm mindful of my position also helps. My doctor suggested a higher pillow or doubling my pillow when I need to, to avoid acid backing up the throat and worsening that swelling.
    bme6zqr16j7p.jpeg

    Observe your body during the process and if you feel OMAD brings about all the GERD symptoms, try eating smaller regular meals and see if that makes a difference. Sometimes it could also be a specific ingredient that just don't suit you.

    I'm just sharing my experiences, it may not be the exact same for you but the past 8 years I have managed it this way and have never needed any antacids or any other GERD meds. Its a balancing thing for me. I just watch for that feeling of nausea, lump, and bloating and I start adjustments until I feel a 100%). It has become less frequent over the years too. Almost rare.
    jdo40idolag2.jpeg

    Sorry for the book, hopefully something there can be useful 🙂

    Thank you so much for this. I do sleep on my right alot so will definitely be more mindful of that... and coffee is out as of tomorrow morning 😊
  • shockbishop
    shockbishop Posts: 38 Member
    Options
    Let me guess, it feels like your throat is closed or almost feels like you can't breathe. It sometimes causes you to panic thinking your throat is closing? Most days I would wake up clearing my throat for first couple of hours and could hardly talk without clearing my throat(pretty embarrassing in meetings). I even remember choking on a few things that I never choke on.

    I had this two years ago when I stopped taking my omeprazole (after 20 years on it) all of a sudden. The acid reflux "rebounds" much worse than it was before on PPIs. I went though about 10 specialist including ENT, GI, Pulmonogist and even Neuro. I had numerous test like MRI (even a full body MRI about 2 hours long). I was miserable, thought I was dying and no doctor could help. I even had weird autoimmune diagnosis and that "silent reflux" diagnosis. Then one day an ENT and vocal specialist looked in esophogus very briefly (as they can't look too long with the upper sphinter in the way) and saw it was very damaged. I knew it was the acid reflux then. The sad thing is all the meds they had added, about 10 in total mostly all caused worse acid reflux. I went back on a double dose of omeprazole with famatodine added in. I felt better in days. I surely didn't have that aweful feeling my throat was closing. The double does of meds caused it's own share of issue like anxiety, nightmares, internal parasites!!! etc... lol but oh well

    Now, fast forward two years. I inclined my bed 6". I tapered off the omeprazole VERY SLOWLY, like 10-20mg reduction and holding it for a week or two with famotodine 20mg substituted(lots of guides out there). Eventually I was completely off omeprazole after 20 years. I had to be very careful as I didn't want that throat close again. Antacids, Gaveston complete (with the alginate sold overseas), sucrufulate(presrciption) I used as needed. Nowdays, I take a famatodine(and thinking about reducing it) in the morning and bedtime....my only drug beside vitamins. I have a sliding hiatel hernia, so I do an excercise to knock it back in place if I'm feeling really crumby. I never lost weight hence I'm starting my journey here.

    I hope this helps you in some way because I know that throat closing feeling and it's scary as heck. I don't know if weight loss is always the answer as in my case I when I was 185lbs in high school and college I had acid reflux. But less pressure in the abdomen is always a good thing.
  • papercut2k
    papercut2k Posts: 83 Member
    edited May 2022
    Options
    Bookmarking this. I am dealing with frequent acid reflux. General practitioner suggested taking Prilosec for a whole month among other things such as losing the excess weight and avoiding certain foods.

    I'm a bit dubious about taking Prilosec for a month when the label reads don't take for more than 2 weeks. So I am trying to lose the weight and eat better.

    The doctor also ordered some poop test. I was thinking I will take the test in July if by losing 20ish pounds or July 15th rolls around and I'm still dealing with it.

    I'll try the pre/probiotics to see if they work. I naturally sleep on my left side and still deal with really bad heartburn. I'm not sure what to think about that.