An obese nutritionist: would you be her patient?

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Replies

  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,552 Member
    PRMinx wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    Most sport coaches are overweight and out of shape, but do they know how to coach and win games? Yes, they do.

    Many surgeons are overweight and out of shape also, so are many healthcare workers. Does that mean that don't know how to do their jobs? No, it doesn't.

    Yeah but professional coaches rely on a team of athletic trainers to get their athletes in gear.

    A surgeon has specific skill sets, including scientific training, medical training and a steady hand. That doesn't mean they know anything about weight loss and nutrition. You are paying them for their ability to operate.

    A better comparison is, would you go to a mental health professional who has mental health challenges.

    well that's not fair- every person I know who works in psychology is effed up- that's one of the reasons they are in that field LOL.



    Innnteresting. On so many levels.

    and I do say that with deep love- one of my very good friends is a PHD in the field. LOL
  • PRMinx
    PRMinx Posts: 4,612 Member
    PRMinx wrote: »
    No, simply because while s/he might know what s/he's talking about nutrition-wise she's obviously not following what s/he's telling her clients.

    There have been similar discussions here except it's "Would you go to an unfit personal trainer" and again, for me the answer is no for the same reasons as the obese nutritionist.

    So, I guess that rules out male OB/GYNs then? Or female prostate specialists...? ;)

    Apples and oranges.

    You're right to a point, but I was just trying to point out that we take advice/assistance from people how can't/don't apply their own expertise all the time (we just may not know the extent that they do/don't... e.g. the mortgage broker whose home is in foreclosure, etc.). The OP is just about a case that's based on a judgement made only by someone's physical appearance.

    Yeah, but it's not like I'm an expert on vaginas because I'm a girl.
  • PRMinx
    PRMinx Posts: 4,612 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    Most sport coaches are overweight and out of shape, but do they know how to coach and win games? Yes, they do.

    Many surgeons are overweight and out of shape also, so are many healthcare workers. Does that mean that don't know how to do their jobs? No, it doesn't.

    Yeah but professional coaches rely on a team of athletic trainers to get their athletes in gear.

    A surgeon has specific skill sets, including scientific training, medical training and a steady hand. That doesn't mean they know anything about weight loss and nutrition. You are paying them for their ability to operate.

    A better comparison is, would you go to a mental health professional who has mental health challenges.

    well that's not fair- every person I know who works in psychology is effed up- that's one of the reasons they are in that field LOL.



    Innnteresting. On so many levels.

    and I do say that with deep love- one of my very good friends is a PHD in the field. LOL

    If you hit my wall, you'll see what I"m getting at. I'm *hoping* therapists can be normal. ;-)
  • goddessofawesome
    goddessofawesome Posts: 563 Member
    "Those who can't do teach."

    I've always had an issue with that quote because it pretty much sums up the problem in the school system.

    A great example is taking business classes and being taught by someone who has never in their life run an actual business.
  • msf74
    msf74 Posts: 3,498 Member
    Ok, a hypothetical here.

    Let's say I am currently slim and devastatingly handsome (well, one doesn't like to boast but...). I have also an excellent knowledge of nutrition.

    Now let's say for whatever reason I pile on the weight over a short space of time (traumatic life event for example.)

    Has my knowledge of nutrition somehow been negated or has it changed? Does the quality of knowledge change with the way I look?
  • yopeeps025
    yopeeps025 Posts: 8,692 Member
    Why see a nutrition if I have no medical issues.
  • bennettinfinity
    bennettinfinity Posts: 865 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    Most sport coaches are overweight and out of shape, but do they know how to coach and win games? Yes, they do.

    Many surgeons are overweight and out of shape also, so are many healthcare workers. Does that mean that don't know how to do their jobs? No, it doesn't.

    Yeah but professional coaches rely on a team of athletic trainers to get their athletes in gear.

    A surgeon has specific skill sets, including scientific training, medical training and a steady hand. That doesn't mean they know anything about weight loss and nutrition. You are paying them for their ability to operate.

    A better comparison is, would you go to a mental health professional who has mental health challenges.

    well that's not fair- every person I know who works in psychology is effed up- that's one of the reasons they are in that field LOL.



    QFT!
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,552 Member
    PRMinx wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    Most sport coaches are overweight and out of shape, but do they know how to coach and win games? Yes, they do.

    Many surgeons are overweight and out of shape also, so are many healthcare workers. Does that mean that don't know how to do their jobs? No, it doesn't.

    Yeah but professional coaches rely on a team of athletic trainers to get their athletes in gear.

    A surgeon has specific skill sets, including scientific training, medical training and a steady hand. That doesn't mean they know anything about weight loss and nutrition. You are paying them for their ability to operate.

    A better comparison is, would you go to a mental health professional who has mental health challenges.

    well that's not fair- every person I know who works in psychology is effed up- that's one of the reasons they are in that field LOL.



    Innnteresting. On so many levels.

    and I do say that with deep love- one of my very good friends is a PHD in the field. LOL

    If you hit my wall, you'll see what I"m getting at. I'm *hoping* therapists can be normal. ;-)

    Firmly on board the train.

    yes- they have problems. for real. My old roommate said he would NEVER ever date another one again- b/c they were EFFED.UP.

    But like I said- I do love my friend- but we've been through some dark days for sure. They make for interesting people though. Love having dinner with her- we get really deep on the little things in life- like coffee creamers and what coffee creamers say about the person who uses them.

    Long conversations about if monkeys only wear pants- or vests and a hat. These things.
  • PRMinx
    PRMinx Posts: 4,612 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    Most sport coaches are overweight and out of shape, but do they know how to coach and win games? Yes, they do.

    Many surgeons are overweight and out of shape also, so are many healthcare workers. Does that mean that don't know how to do their jobs? No, it doesn't.

    Yeah but professional coaches rely on a team of athletic trainers to get their athletes in gear.

    A surgeon has specific skill sets, including scientific training, medical training and a steady hand. That doesn't mean they know anything about weight loss and nutrition. You are paying them for their ability to operate.

    A better comparison is, would you go to a mental health professional who has mental health challenges.

    well that's not fair- every person I know who works in psychology is effed up- that's one of the reasons they are in that field LOL.



    Innnteresting. On so many levels.

    and I do say that with deep love- one of my very good friends is a PHD in the field. LOL

    If you hit my wall, you'll see what I"m getting at. I'm *hoping* therapists can be normal. ;-)

    Firmly on board the train.

    yes- they have problems. for real. My old roommate said he would NEVER ever date another one again- b/c they were EFFED.UP.

    But like I said- I do love my friend- but we've been through some dark days for sure. They make for interesting people though. Love having dinner with her- we get really deep on the little things in life- like coffee creamers and what coffee creamers say about the person who uses them.

    Long conversations about if monkeys only wear pants- or vests and a hat. These things.

    LOL.

    In all honesty, I do love the deep conversations.
  • PRMinx
    PRMinx Posts: 4,612 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    No, simply because while s/he might know what s/he's talking about nutrition-wise she's obviously not following what s/he's telling her clients.

    There have been similar discussions here except it's "Would you go to an unfit personal trainer" and again, for me the answer is no for the same reasons as the obese nutritionist.

    So, I guess that rules out male OB/GYNs then? Or female prostate specialists...? ;)

    Apples and oranges.

    You're right to a point, but I was just trying to point out that we take advice/assistance from people how can't/don't apply their own expertise all the time (we just may not know the extent that they do/don't... e.g. the mortgage broker whose home is in foreclosure, etc.). The OP is just about a case that's based on a judgement made only by someone's physical appearance.

    Yeah, but it's not like I'm an expert on vaginas because I'm a girl.
    You're not??????



    That's it I want a divorce. I get the dog.

    That's cool. I want the cat anyway. And all my fun foodie kitchen supplies (yep, just read that thread).
  • JazzFischer1989
    JazzFischer1989 Posts: 531 Member
    edited December 2014
    I would as long as the information she provided for me was accurate and her personal health issues didn't affect her ability to help me.

    It's interesting you mention this though, as recently, I've been faced w/this issue. I have struggled with a dysfunctional relationship w/food for the past few years and it's only been within the last year or so that I've been getting back on track and seeking help. I have been seeing a therapist who happens to be very overweight. Normally this would be irrelevant to me, but I started to get the sense that he was projecting his issues onto me - telling me there's nothing wrong with being as underweight as I am, discouraging me to gain (which I've been doing anyway), telling me people are envious of my frame and praising me for being thin. I stopped seeing him a couple of weeks ago because of this. At my worst, I was about 89-90 lbs at 5'3" when I met him and it felt like I had to convince that there was something wrong.

    I digress. Overall, it depends on the person. I might be a little more wary in the future, but I still won't assume the worst based on appearance.
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    7elizamae wrote: »
    The title says it all: would you go to an obese nutritionist for weight-loss help?

    Would you go to an illiterate for reading help?

  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,552 Member
    PRMinx wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    Most sport coaches are overweight and out of shape, but do they know how to coach and win games? Yes, they do.

    Many surgeons are overweight and out of shape also, so are many healthcare workers. Does that mean that don't know how to do their jobs? No, it doesn't.

    Yeah but professional coaches rely on a team of athletic trainers to get their athletes in gear.

    A surgeon has specific skill sets, including scientific training, medical training and a steady hand. That doesn't mean they know anything about weight loss and nutrition. You are paying them for their ability to operate.

    A better comparison is, would you go to a mental health professional who has mental health challenges.

    well that's not fair- every person I know who works in psychology is effed up- that's one of the reasons they are in that field LOL.



    Innnteresting. On so many levels.

    and I do say that with deep love- one of my very good friends is a PHD in the field. LOL

    If you hit my wall, you'll see what I"m getting at. I'm *hoping* therapists can be normal. ;-)

    Firmly on board the train.

    yes- they have problems. for real. My old roommate said he would NEVER ever date another one again- b/c they were EFFED.UP.

    But like I said- I do love my friend- but we've been through some dark days for sure. They make for interesting people though. Love having dinner with her- we get really deep on the little things in life- like coffee creamers and what coffee creamers say about the person who uses them.

    Long conversations about if monkeys only wear pants- or vests and a hat. These things.

    LOL.

    In all honesty, I do love the deep conversations.

    I find the more trivial the matter- the more entertaining the depth of said long conversation. it's good. and it makes me happy. :D
  • gothchiq
    gothchiq Posts: 4,592 Member
    No, I probably wouldn't. Because if s/he is not doing something that works, how can s/he help me learn to do something that works?
  • esjones12
    esjones12 Posts: 1,363 Member
    I met a few times with a heavier RD. She knew what she was talking about and the advice she gave me worked. She was a great teacher and was able to communicate clearly. I've also had sessions with slim nutritionists who did not really hit the mark.

    It's great to have people who "practice what they preach" but I would much rather have someone who I can connect with and understand.
  • PRMinx wrote: »
    Most sport coaches are overweight and out of shape, but do they know how to coach and win games? Yes, they do.

    Many surgeons are overweight and out of shape also, so are many healthcare workers. Does that mean that don't know how to do their jobs? No, it doesn't.

    Yeah but professional coaches rely on a team of athletic trainers to get their athletes in gear.

    A surgeon has specific skill sets, including scientific training, medical training and a steady hand. That doesn't mean they know anything about weight loss and nutrition. You are paying them for their ability to operate.

    A better comparison is, would you go to a mental health professional who has mental health challenges.

    LOL. As the child of a mental health professional, the common joke is: Q:"What do you need to become a therapist?"
    A: "First you need to be slightly crazier than your patients."
  • I don't see why not. As long as her credentials, track record, and recommendations checked out.
    Just because she knows all the rules, doesn't mean she personally has to follow them.
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    The OP is just about a case that's based on a judgement made only by someone's physical appearance.

    Disagree. It's a judgement based on someone's actions - actions that result in obesity.
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,427 Member
    7elizamae wrote: »
    The title says it all: would you go to an obese nutritionist for weight-loss help?

    This question came up in a group discussion -- there was disagreement. I said I'd post here and get some more opinions from the MFP board.

    I would give them the same chance as any other nutritionist.
    I don't think nutritionists are required to have training or regulation like a dietitian though so I probably wouldn't go to a nutritionist if I had a health problem. I would go to a dietitian instead.
    eatrightdc.org/dietitian-vs-nutritionist/