An obese nutritionist: would you be her patient?

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Replies

  • myheartsabattleground
    myheartsabattleground Posts: 2,040 Member
    My GP is obese.
  • retropactum
    retropactum Posts: 75 Member
    edited December 2014
    Back to the OP...

    Said nutritionist/dietician is not "dieting" for you, so the only self discipline that matters is the patient's

    Personally, I find it really hard to take advice from a person that is thin/average who has never dealt with the residual issues of obesity. So yes, I’d like to think if I ever went to a nutritionist, I would not write them off simply due to their own weight. Knowledge and practice are very different, as many people are pointing out. Credentials are credentials, and while I see how it can deter people from seeing him/her, I don’t think its valid and it simply shows the prejudice in our society.
  • dbmata
    dbmata Posts: 12,952 Member
    dbmata wrote: »
    Definition of Obese:

    Height

    Weight Range

    BMI

    Considered


    5' 9"
    124 lbs or less Below 18.5 Underweight
    125 lbs to 168 lbs 18.5 to 24.9 Healthy weight
    169 lbs to 202 lbs 25.0 to 29.9 Overweight
    203 lbs or more 30 or higher Obese

    You mean a 5' 9" guy at 203lbs can't be considered to be trainer?
    Someone should tell Donny Shankle that Pendlay can't be a trainer. lol.

    I'm not going to tell him; of course, I would be honoured to have Pendlay and/or Rippetoe as a trainer!
    srsly.
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    edited December 2014
    Choosing an obese nutritionist means not-choosing a healthy and fit nutritionist.

  • JenAndSome
    JenAndSome Posts: 1,908 Member
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    Choosing an obese nutritionist means not-choosing a healthy and fit nutritionist.

    I'm pretty healthy and fit and would be a terrible nutritionist. Just because you look the part doesn't always mean you are the best person for the job and vice versa.

  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    JenAndSome wrote: »
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    Choosing an obese nutritionist means not-choosing a healthy and fit nutritionist.
    Just because you look the part doesn't always mean you are the best person for the job and vice versa.

    Nobody claimed otherwise.
  • Causes of obesity according to Mayo clinic :
    • Inactivity.
    • Unhealthy diet and eating habits.
    • Pregnancy. .
    • Lack of sleep. Too little sleep can cause changes in hormones that increase your appetite. You may also crave foods high in calories and carbohydrates, which can contribute to weight gain.
    • Certain medications. Some medications can lead to weight gain if you don't compensate through diet or activity. These medications include some antidepressants, anti-seizure medications, diabetes medications, antipsychotic medications, corticosteroids and beta blockers.
    • Medical problems. Obesity can sometimes be traced to a medical cause, such as Prader-Willi syndrome, Cushing's syndrome, and other diseases and conditions. Some medical problems, such as arthritis, can lead to decreased activity, which may result in weight gain.

    Risk Factors of obesity:
    • Genetics. Your genes may affect the amount of body fat you store and where that fat is distributed. Genetics may also play a role in how efficiently your body converts food into energy and how your body burns calories during exercise. Even when someone has a genetic predisposition, environmental factors ultimately make you gain more weight.
    • Family lifestyle. Obesity tends to run in families. That's not just because of genetics. Family members tend to have similar eating, lifestyle and activity habits. If one or both of your parents are obese, your risk of being obese is increased.
    • Inactivity. .
    • Unhealthy diet and eating habits. A diet that's high in calories, lacking in fruits and vegetables, full of fast food, missing breakfast, and laden with high-calorie beverages and oversized portions contributes to weight gain.
    • Quitting smoking. Quitting smoking is often associated with weight gain. And for some, it can lead to enough weight gain that the person becomes obese. In the long run, however, quitting smoking is still a greater benefit to your health than continuing to smoke.
    • Pregnancy. .
    • Lack of sleep.
    • Certain medications.
    • Age. Obesity can occur at any age, even in young children. But as you age, hormonal changes and a less active lifestyle increase your risk of obesity. In addition, the amount of muscle in your body tends to decrease with age. This lower muscle mass leads to a decrease in metabolism. These changes also reduce calorie needs and can make it harder to keep off excess weight. If you don't control what you eat and consciously become more physically active as you age, you'll likely gain weight.
    • Social and economic issues. Certain social and economic issues may be linked to obesity. You may not have safe areas to exercise, you may not have been taught healthy ways of cooking or you may not have money to buy healthier foods. In addition, the people you spend time with may influence your weight — you're more likely to become obese if you have obese friends or relatives.
    • Medical problems.


    Original article : http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/obesity/basics/definition/con-20014834


    Having said all that, why will you not go to an obese nutritionist??? There could be tones of reason why s/he is overweight. It is like saying you will not go to a cardiologist because s/he has a history of myocardial infraction (heart attack) or an oncologist because s/he is suffering from some sort of cancer. Yes, you have the rights to chose your own healthcare provider, but I really find it bit demeaning to refuse a professional based on his/her appearances!
  • JenAndSome
    JenAndSome Posts: 1,908 Member
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    JenAndSome wrote: »
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    Choosing an obese nutritionist means not-choosing a healthy and fit nutritionist.
    Just because you look the part doesn't always mean you are the best person for the job and vice versa.

    Nobody claimed otherwise.

    Okay. When I am to see a specialist I am either referred by my doctor or will look one up online or in the phone book. The first things I look for are convenience and then, if they have them readily available, reviews and references. If you are picking a nutritionist (or any other professional) based on appearance and not experience, in my opinion, you are doing it wrong.

  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    JenAndSome wrote: »
    The first things I look for are convenience...[snip]...you are doing it wrong....

    Ok, then.

  • yopeeps025
    yopeeps025 Posts: 8,692 Member
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    JenAndSome wrote: »
    The first things I look for are convenience...[snip]...you are doing it wrong....

    Ok, then.

    I like this guy. He owns up to this which is a very special snowflake.
  • stealthq
    stealthq Posts: 4,298 Member
    edited December 2014
    JenAndSome wrote: »
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    Choosing an obese nutritionist means not-choosing a healthy and fit nutritionist.

    I'm pretty healthy and fit and would be a terrible nutritionist. Just because you look the part doesn't always mean you are the best person for the job and vice versa.

    Are you marketing yourself as a nutritionist? If not, then not a good comparison.

    It comes down to this. You are buying a service.
    Service provider A behaves or appears in such a way that indicates they might not be what you need.
    Service provider B behaves or appears in such a way that is consistent with what you need.

    If you have no other information, who in their right mind goes with service provider A?
  • msf74
    msf74 Posts: 3,498 Member
    stealthq wrote: »

    It comes down to this. You are buying a service.
    Service provider A behaves or appears in such a way that indicates they might not be what you need.
    Service provider B behaves or appears in such a way that is consistent with what you need.

    If you have no other information, who in their right mind goes with service provider A?

    Right and that is the way many people will make a choice which is the real world. Ideally as rational consumers we should look at both service providers, get full information on both of them and then having considered all the pros and cons of each make a decision. However, as human beings we rarely have the time or inclination to go through such a process for all if any decisions we have and so we go by limited information which usually favours the provider who's "face fits". It is essentially playing the odds.

    However, the issue this creates is similar to the economic problem of statistical discrimination (as opposed to outright prejudice) in the labour market for example. It means that progression is not necessarily on pure merit but other factors including bias. If consumers have no reason to question their behaviour or are not challenged on it then that bias perpetuates over time and is a bar to a meritocracy.

    What this thread shows is that many people will get no information at all about an obese nutritionist and dismiss them out of hand wheras if they had got full information they may be a better choice than than the slimmer nutritionist.

    And so bias can be perpetuated. Some may argue that is simply the way of things. I would rather challenge it.
  • NextPage
    NextPage Posts: 609 Member
    Assuming, by obese you mean clinically obese, the answer is no. I don't think the issue is just whether or not someone has the knowledge - i.e they can talk the talk. If I'm hiring a nutritionist or trainer I want someone with expertise and a role model (someone who also walks the walk). I also wouldn't go to a doctor who is a chain smoker since this type of behaviour is so anti-health he/she would lack credibility for me. Frankly the old "do as I say not as I do" didn't work well for my parents. I'm certainly not going to accept it from someone who I'm paying and whose actions and advise my effect my health and well being.

    If as a consumer you don't believe there is a link between obesity and health, then I suppose it wouldn't matter.
  • mykaylis
    mykaylis Posts: 320 Member
    i would definitely accept a nutritionist (rncp specifically) or dietitian who was obese. her weight is none of my business. her information could still be sound. she might understand some of the difficulties i have with eating, while my sister (a personal trainer, naturally thin, exercise addict, loves vegetables) has no bloody clue. i trust my sister because she has great credentials and information, but there's a disconnect emotionally where a normal-weight or heavier person might come at it from a different direction.
  • marinabreeze
    marinabreeze Posts: 141 Member
    NextPage wrote: »
    Assuming, by obese you mean clinically obese, the answer is no. I don't think the issue is just whether or not someone has the knowledge - i.e they can talk the talk. If I'm hiring a nutritionist or trainer I want someone with expertise and a role model (someone who also walks the walk). I also wouldn't go to a doctor who is a chain smoker since this type of behaviour is so anti-health he/she would lack credibility for me. Frankly the old "do as I say not as I do" didn't work well for my parents. I'm certainly not going to accept it from someone who I'm paying and whose actions and advise my effect my health and well being.

    If as a consumer you don't believe there is a link between obesity and health, then I suppose it wouldn't matter.

    Correlation does not equal causation.

    If someone is obese, we don't know where they are in their journey - if they were once larger, if they had a number of other factors that led to weight gain, etc. Regardless of what the issue is for *many* people, that doesn't mean that you can take a look at someone and know their story.

    Also, I would rather have a nutritionist that knew my struggle than someone who has not and is now telling me what I need to do. Just like not every fat person is fat because of bad choices, not every thin person is thin because they ate right and worked hard for it.
  • JeffseekingV
    JeffseekingV Posts: 3,172 Member
    You can be thin and still know nothing about nutrition and be out of shape.
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    msf74 wrote: »
    However, the issue this creates is similar to the economic problem of statistical discrimination (as opposed to outright prejudice) in the labour market for example. It means that progression is not necessarily on pure merit but other factors including bias. If consumers have no reason to question their behaviour or are not challenged on it then that bias perpetuates over time and is a bar to a meritocracy.

    Your initial assumption of "who has time to dig?" already precludes the possibility of an actual meritocracy, so that's not really an issue.


  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    Regardless of what the issue is for *many* people, that doesn't mean that you can take a look at someone and know their story.

    I don't want to know their story.

    I'm shopping for a service, and want to make the best quick decision I can. That means, all else being equal, picking the person who most looks like the job.



  • No_Finish_Line
    No_Finish_Line Posts: 3,664 Member
    I've seen too many hack doctors. Just being fat doesn't mean she doesn't know here profession, but its not the best sign either.

    if its the only red flag then I wouldn't worry about it... but someone who's totally clueless might not pick up on them