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Too heavy to run

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24

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  • nordlead2005
    nordlead2005 Posts: 1,303 Member
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    I ran and played Ultimate Frisbee at 100kg. I'm also a 5'11" guy, but still, I was obese. Now I actually run on occasion (not just to catch a frisbee), and did a 5k last week at 84kg.

    There is no "right" weight. Just go out and try, and if you start to feel any joint pain revert to walking. Granted, if you don't run you won't make it far before you have to revert to walking due to muscle and cardio restrictions, but that is perfectly fine.

    I also like couch to 5k, but didn't do it myself. Since I previously ran when playing Ultimate I just did a run as long as I could (~10 minutes) followed by a 5 minute walk and then repeat. I kept at it until I knocked out 2 15 minute runs, and then last week just dropped the 5 minute walk between runs and kept going until I hit 5k (I'm pretty slow).
  • TiberiusClaudis
    TiberiusClaudis Posts: 423 Member
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    As many have stated above, walking is an outstanding first step. That's how I began my journey of losing 60lbs in 3 months. Started taking dog for walk for 30 mins...then an hr...then two hrs. As your weight decreases you get more and more excited. Eventually I DID start jogging..and I've always hated jogging but in time, I even got good at that. At one point I could run for 2 hrs non stop...my only regret is that I didn't spend time in the gym doing sometype of weights. I did start that after about 6 months and 18 months later got on stage as a bodybuilder. All because I started walking...
  • Fit4LifeAR
    Fit4LifeAR Posts: 233 Member
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    I started running at 270 pounds and become addicted. I hated the idea but decided to give it a try on the treadmill one day. 5 years later, I was still running. It was the most relaxing thing I could do. I loved putting my head phones in and just going for a long run. Oh yeah, I lost 70 pounds along the way too lol.

    Interestingly enough, I stopped running and started lifting more, and rapidly lost more weight. I had to give running up about 3 months ago. I've been miserable, I want to go out and run so bad. The doctors have found what they are calling a "degenerative" issue within my knee cartilage. At 35 I have three areas in my knee that are bone on bone. I went in for surgery and it was too extensive to repair, so I am approved for a knee replacement already. So, if you have arthritis, pay attention to your knees. Understand running is going to hurt at first, you will be really sore. But, sore is different than an injury. Make sure you know the difference. And oh yeah, back to my point, make sure you are lifting too.
  • usmcmp
    usmcmp Posts: 21,219 Member
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    Running isn't required for weight loss. There are tons of activities you can do that will improve your heart and lung health. Focusing on calorie intake is the most important part of weight loss. Physical activity can help, but it's not going to cause the weight loss. Walking, hiking, strength training, swimming, riding a bicycle, and so many other activities are available.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    Goodness gracious, people, it's not just excuses! At over 200 pounds (90 KG) I was too afraid to run for good reason. There is extra stress on all the joints. My weight loss team preferred I do water exercise until I was lighter but I just couldn't get in to it.

    @kattyjamesmfp , let your body be your guide. I walked before I ran. I had the same fears you have and I did not try running until I dropped under 200 pounds. My daughter was very afraid I would hurt myself so I took an eight week running class to allay her fears (and mine). I tried lots of things and the ones I found enjoyable I stuck with.

    I took up running because walking was getting easy (and boring).
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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  • jchite84
    jchite84 Posts: 467 Member
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    Just wanted to echo everybody's comments here. If you want to run - start running. Do C25K. Focus on running the speed that you need to run to complete the distance. Get some good shoes, and watch lots of YouTube videos on proper running form. It will go a long way towards easing the stress you put on your joints. Also - jogging is a dirty word. A runner is a runner no matter what speed. Don't cheapen your achievement by saying "oh, I'm only jogging". I started running at 250 lbs (113 kg?) and arthritic knees. I did the Couch 2 5K and ran my first mile in 6 weeks. Since then I've run every distance from 5Ks to marathons and I'm training for a 50K now. You can do anything you put your mind to, just remember - run the speed that you need to run to complete the distance. Fast running will come later.
  • GaleHawkins
    GaleHawkins Posts: 8,159 Member
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    RodaRose wrote: »
    There is no reason to run and overwork your joints.
    Project your joints.
    Do walking, swimming, weight lifting.

    I agree with this but I understand there are many different views.

    A little over a year ago I extremely limited in what I could do with advanced arthritis pain and lack of muscles due to not moving as much due to the pain. I was able to address the pain by diet and started walking walking 0.25 miles daily down and back up a steep hill which I still do every day as a minimum but have walked a mile at a time successful.

    At first I had to rest many times but I would complete the quarter mile walk. While I can kind of jog a short distance I do not unless it is raining. :)

    From research I find no downside to walking but there can some negatives to running as we age. It is the increased inflammation from running that would be my main concern in my case increasing my risks of death.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,248 Member
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    I was about 107kg (235lbs) when I started running (I'm not sure you could really have called it that, more of a slow shuffle....) and I stared off with 1 min "running" and 9 min walking the 2 min running, 8 min walking etc etc etc until I could run 10 min without stopping and built up from there (my longest distance is now a half marathon & Olympic duathon)

    Before I started running I walked, I walked a lot. Depending on your fitness level walking may be the perfect place to start.

    When you do start running go slow, if you're huffing & puffing and short of breath you're going too fast. Your breathing should be deep and relaxed (it should feel like work but shouldn't be killing you).

    Take your time, progress slowly and you'll amaze yourself with what you can accomplish.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,248 Member
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    RodaRose wrote: »
    There is no reason to run and overwork your joints.
    Project your joints.
    Do walking, swimming, weight lifting.

    Running does not damage your joints in fact research has demonstrated that runners suffer no higher rates of arthritis than the general population. However, I'm also a strong advocate of cross training so yes......swim, bike, lift weights etc

  • yusaku02
    yusaku02 Posts: 3,472 Member
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    I started running about about 90kg since that was the heaviest I got to. I think my father started running at about 105kg. It just depends on what kind of shape your joints are in. If you don't want to risk putting too much strain on them then start easy with walking and emphasize a calorie deficit during this time so you lose weight to the point where you feel comfortable running/jogging.
  • summerdaze120
    summerdaze120 Posts: 425 Member
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    usmcmp wrote: »
    Running isn't required for weight loss. There are tons of activities you can do that will improve your heart and lung health. Focusing on calorie intake is the most important part of weight loss. Physical activity can help, but it's not going to cause the weight loss. Walking, hiking, strength training, swimming, riding a bicycle, and so many other activities are available.

    Totally agree!! I was working my butt off at the gym and wasn't losing/gaining weight, I was staying the same. My PT told me that in order to see change (weight loss) I had to focus on my calorie intake/diet. As soon as I focused my attention to what was going in my mouth and how much, I noticed I started losing weight. I also continued all of my physical activity. Change happens in the kitchen! Also, I would start out walking (short distances and then long distances). Work your way up to jogging/running. Remember, change doesn't happen over night, it takes time and it will come if you stay committed :) Good luck!
  • Fit4LifeAR
    Fit4LifeAR Posts: 233 Member
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    RodaRose wrote: »
    There is no reason to run and overwork your joints.
    Project your joints.
    Do walking, swimming, weight lifting.

    Running does not damage your joints in fact research has demonstrated that runners suffer no higher rates of arthritis than the general population. However, I'm also a strong advocate of cross training so yes......swim, bike, lift weights etc

    My doctor said this too. If there is no underlying issue in your joints, jogging is good for you. Remember, soreness is not an injury.

  • WhatMeRunning
    WhatMeRunning Posts: 3,538 Member
    edited November 2015
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    I began running at 284 pounds (128 kg), which for me was a BMI of 36.5.

    Best decision I ever made.

    As for knees, joints, yada, yada....I had a knee injury in my 20's that somehow made me convinced I could never be a runner. Yet here in my 40's at that weight above I started running. All of my achy knee issues have since disappeared. I feel stronger than ever in every single part of my body.
  • djscavone
    djscavone Posts: 133 Member
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    A lot of great advice here. I have to comment that I agree with the walk before you run advice and really ask yourself if you want to lose weight or run. When I started I walked for six months before I even attempted to jog one step down the block. As others said you can and will lose weight without running just as you can run without losing weight. Diet and exercise go well together but are also separate. Getting healthy is a good thing so I am glad you are looking to get healthy.

    As for your size, I have been in many 5K races where there are people a lot heavier than you who took their time and safely completed the race. So it can be done.
  • kattyjamesmfp
    kattyjamesmfp Posts: 38 Member
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    Thank you everybody ! Decided to try Couch to 5K starting tomorrow, and listen to my joints.
  • Thowe92
    Thowe92 Posts: 109 Member
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    Anybody can run or jog. Once your heart and lungs build up enough endurance you'd be surprised at how far/long you can go.
  • hmichaud09
    hmichaud09 Posts: 66 Member
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    I'm 5'2" 99 kg (218.5 lbs) and I dont run. I started walking longer distances last week so it will be a bit before I'm up to jogging. However, as I'm busty, running for me is awkward no matter what. I have yet to find a sports bra that makes me feel secure enough to try to jog.

    My advice (From when I used to jog), do short bursts at first. I would walk 1/4 mile, jog 1/4 and alternate it that way until my jogging 1/4 didn't seem to take as much effort, and I built up the time of my jogging. Someday I hope to be doing that again.
  • brandid34
    brandid34 Posts: 154 Member
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    Start walking and as you feel more comfortable, drop a little more weigh and get in the habit you can start to add short intervals of jogging and add to it as it's comfortable :)