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Anti-inflammatory foods

Alatariel75Alatariel75 Posts: 17,806Member Member Posts: 17,806Member Member
OK, so I have somewhat of an interest in whether there are indeed foods which have anti-inflammatory properties (or conversely, inflammatory properties). I'm particularly interested in the context of inflammation caused by autoimmune disorders, but interested in the broader research also.

As one would expect, there appears to be a whoooole lot of woo and vested interest information around the topic.

So in the (mangled) words of Jerry McGuire - "Show me the science!"
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Replies

  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,180Member Member Posts: 3,180Member Member
    I would put probiotics and fermented food into that category. It's not a food, but calorie restricting in general and possibly intermittent fasting has been connected with improvements in autoimmune disorders. Sorry, don't have time to look up studies atm, but easily googlable if you are interested.
    edited February 2016
  • Loosing63Loosing63 Posts: 672Member Member Posts: 672Member Member
    Bromelain (in pineapple) and turmeric (spice) are anti-inflammatory.
    I don't have the time to pull the research either, you can google it.

  • Alatariel75Alatariel75 Posts: 17,806Member Member Posts: 17,806Member Member
    Can I just be clear - I started this thread in the Nutrition Debate section as a precursor to actual debate and science. I am googling and reading journals, doing quite a lot of research in fact. "Google it" isn't what I was looking for. I was looking for an actual discussion.
  • jgnatcajgnatca Posts: 14,495Member Member Posts: 14,495Member Member
    I think this is an excellent topic! I googled "controversy anti-inflammatory foods". Here's a general article. I'll do my best to give you a run for your money.

    http://www.arthritis-health.com/treatment/diet-and-nutrition/what-are-anti-inflammatory-foods

    I am curious who these "experts" are, too.
  • Alatariel75Alatariel75 Posts: 17,806Member Member Posts: 17,806Member Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I think this is an excellent topic! I googled "controversy anti-inflammatory foods". Here's a general article. I'll do my best to give you a run for your money.

    http://www.arthritis-health.com/treatment/diet-and-nutrition/what-are-anti-inflammatory-foods

    I am curious who these "experts" are, too.

    Thank you! That seems to be a similar, but far more extensive list of the Harvard Heath list: http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/foods-that-fight-inflammation

  • jgnatcajgnatca Posts: 14,495Member Member Posts: 14,495Member Member
    This study found no difference between refined flours and whole grains in immune response.

    http://jn.nutrition.org/content/137/6/1401.short
  • Pinkylee77Pinkylee77 Posts: 432Member Member Posts: 432Member Member
    it is interesting that in India they use specific spices and herbs added to their meals depending on their health condition. Turmeric is on of them and an interesting one is Fenugreek they use it in foods when someone has diabetes. I know several Doctors from India it is fascinating to talk to them.
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,180Member Member Posts: 3,180Member Member
    Can I just be clear - I started this thread in the Nutrition Debate section as a precursor to actual debate and science. I am googling and reading journals, doing quite a lot of research in fact. "Google it" isn't what I was looking for. I was looking for an actual discussion.

    Sorry, I was in a hurry, but I'm interested in proper discussion myself. Here is supporting evidence for Omega 3/fish oil for RA but not IBD or asthma. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22765297

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are n-3 fatty acids found in oily fish and fish oil supplements. These fatty acids are able to inhibit partly a number of aspects of inflammation including leucocyte chemotaxis, adhesion molecule expression and leucocyte-endothelial adhesive interactions, production of eicosanoids like prostaglandins and leukotrienes from the n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, production of inflammatory cytokines and T cell reactivity. In parallel, EPA gives rise to eicosanoids that often have lower biological potency than those produced from arachidonioc acid and EPA and DHA give rise to anti-inflammatory and inflammation resolving resolvins and protectins. Mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory actions of n-3 fatty acids include altered cell membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition, disruption of lipid rafts, inhibition of activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B so reducing expression of inflammatory genes, activation of the anti-inflammatory transcription factor NR1C3 (i.e. peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ) and binding to the G protein coupled receptor GPR120. These mechanisms are interlinked. In adult humans, an EPA plus DHA intake greater than 2 g day⁻¹ seems to be required to elicit anti-inflammatory actions, but few dose finding studies have been performed. Animal models demonstrate benefit from n-3 fatty acids in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asthma. Clinical trials of fish oil in patients with RA demonstrate benefit supported by meta-analyses of the data. Clinical trails of fish oil in patients with IBD and asthma are inconsistent with no overall clear evidence of efficacy

  • jgnatcajgnatca Posts: 14,495Member Member Posts: 14,495Member Member
    I am suspicious altogether with the Harvard team and the direction of its research. I'm finding it hard to reconcile the claims they have.
  • Alatariel75Alatariel75 Posts: 17,806Member Member Posts: 17,806Member Member
    Can I just be clear - I started this thread in the Nutrition Debate section as a precursor to actual debate and science. I am googling and reading journals, doing quite a lot of research in fact. "Google it" isn't what I was looking for. I was looking for an actual discussion.

    Sorry, I was in a hurry, but I'm interested in proper discussion myself. Here is supporting evidence for Omega 3/fish oil for RA but not IBD or asthma. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22765297

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are n-3 fatty acids found in oily fish and fish oil supplements. These fatty acids are able to inhibit partly a number of aspects of inflammation including leucocyte chemotaxis, adhesion molecule expression and leucocyte-endothelial adhesive interactions, production of eicosanoids like prostaglandins and leukotrienes from the n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, production of inflammatory cytokines and T cell reactivity. In parallel, EPA gives rise to eicosanoids that often have lower biological potency than those produced from arachidonioc acid and EPA and DHA give rise to anti-inflammatory and inflammation resolving resolvins and protectins. Mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory actions of n-3 fatty acids include altered cell membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition, disruption of lipid rafts, inhibition of activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B so reducing expression of inflammatory genes, activation of the anti-inflammatory transcription factor NR1C3 (i.e. peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ) and binding to the G protein coupled receptor GPR120. These mechanisms are interlinked. In adult humans, an EPA plus DHA intake greater than 2 g day⁻¹ seems to be required to elicit anti-inflammatory actions, but few dose finding studies have been performed. Animal models demonstrate benefit from n-3 fatty acids in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asthma. Clinical trials of fish oil in patients with RA demonstrate benefit supported by meta-analyses of the data. Clinical trails of fish oil in patients with IBD and asthma are inconsistent with no overall clear evidence of efficacy

    That is interesting, I have been taking fish oil for some time on a recommendation, due to knee issues. I have noted a reduction in knee issues, but at the same time I've lost 50ish lbs and have stepped up the exercise so I don't think I could pin it on the fish oil :)

    jgnatca wrote: »
    I am suspicious altogether with the Harvard team and the direction of its research. I'm finding it hard to reconcile the claims they have.

    Yeah, on one hand - Harvard med. On the other, it seems overly simplistic and more clickbait than research.
  • WetcoasterWetcoaster Posts: 1,790Member Member Posts: 1,790Member Member
    https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/inflammation-both-friend-and-foe/

    Certain foods are hyped as anti-inflammatory and certain dietary supplements are marketed with claims that they are anti-inflammatory. Integrative medicine guru Andrew Weil promotes both foods and supplements. Unfortunately, it is not clear that they can actually reduce the kind of inflammation that is associated with chronic diseases, or that such reductions actually prevent or improve the clinical course of those diseases. It is conceivable that they might lead to harm as well as benefit. If they really diminish the body’s ability to mount an inflammatory response, wouldn’t that also tend to impair wound healing and response to infection? Fortunately, most of the anti-inflammatory diet recommendations are consistent with consensus recommendations for a healthy diet (lots of fruits and vegetables, etc.). Anti-inflammatory medications like NSAIDs and steroids do reduce inflammation, but they have had limited use in treating diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and they have problematic side effects. In fact, steroids make people more vulnerable to infection.

    For the present, we have only hints. Research like Dr. Ozcan’s will help us better understand the risks, benefits, and complexities of inflammatory processes. Meanwhile, it’s a mistake to oversimplify and to assume inflammation is always a bad thing, and trying to prevent or treat it with special foods and supplements is little more than a shot in the dark, a gamble based on speculation. Eat your vegetables and stay tuned!
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,180Member Member Posts: 3,180Member Member
    Looked for phytochemicals (fruits and veggies) and anti inflammatory studies just now. So far only see one talking about inflammation that results in colo-rectal cancer. Interesting, but perhaps not what you are looking for. Here is the link. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23597198
  • darwinwoodkadarwinwoodka Posts: 322Member Member Posts: 322Member Member
    All I know is I stopped eating most refined flours and started eating more fish and EPA/DHA supplementing, and stopped having any arthritis pain and joint inflammation. It may be placebo, but whatever, it worked.
    edited February 2016
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    My GI doesn't recommend fish oil supplements for IBD. Also NSAIDs are off limits most IBD sufferers because of potential GI bleeding and worsening of symptoms when taken.
  • jgnatcajgnatca Posts: 14,495Member Member Posts: 14,495Member Member
    I also saw articles linking inflammatory response to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and alzheimers. What I want to see is how various foods were tagged as being inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. The list of "baddies" is suspicious.
    • refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and pastries
    • French fries and other fried foods
    • soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages
    • red meat (burgers, steaks) and processed meat (hot dogs, sausage)
    • margarine, shortening, and lard

    In other words, the North American Diet. Yet in the controlled study I linked, no difference was found between refined flours and whole grains in the inflammatory response. So who put this list together and what was it based on?
  • Alatariel75Alatariel75 Posts: 17,806Member Member Posts: 17,806Member Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I also saw articles linking inflammatory response to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and alzheimers. What I want to see is how various foods were tagged as being inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. The list of "baddies" is suspicious.
    • refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and pastries
    • French fries and other fried foods
    • soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages
    • red meat (burgers, steaks) and processed meat (hot dogs, sausage)
    • margarine, shortening, and lard

    In other words, the North American Diet. Yet in the controlled study I linked, no difference was found between refined flours and whole grains in the inflammatory response. So who put this list together and what was it based on?

    That's the identical list as on the Harvard site. I read the same thing and thought the same. It's such a classic "rogues gallery" that it seems suspicious and agenda driven.
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,180Member Member Posts: 3,180Member Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I also saw articles linking inflammatory response to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and alzheimers. What I want to see is how various foods were tagged as being inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. The list of "baddies" is suspicious.
    • refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and pastries
    • French fries and other fried foods
    • soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages
    • red meat (burgers, steaks) and processed meat (hot dogs, sausage)
    • margarine, shortening, and lard

    In other words, the North American Diet. Yet in the controlled study I linked, no difference was found between refined flours and whole grains in the inflammatory response. So who put this list together and what was it based on?

    I saw pretty much the same list in an article I was reading. The conclusion of the article was: "Remember, the inflammatory reaction in itself is not a bad thing. In fact, the body needs it to fight off infection and to help repair muscular or tissue damage. Problems arise when inflammation becomes chronic. The best approach is to focus on prevention by including the above foods in the diet on a regular basis. Exercise, stress management and proper hydration are also key elements to keeping the body well-tuned, saving inflammation for when it is really needed."

    The list of foods they encouraged you to include were basically all omega3, cold water fish, fish oil supplements and nuts containing omega3 like walnuts, and phytochemical containing fruits and veggies. Water was on their list too. First time I have read the connection with hydration, although it makes sense.
    http://www.canadianliving.com/health/nutrition/the_anti_inflammatory_diet.php
    edited February 2016
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I also saw articles linking inflammatory response to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and alzheimers. What I want to see is how various foods were tagged as being inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. The list of "baddies" is suspicious.
    • refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and pastries
    • French fries and other fried foods
    • soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages
    • red meat (burgers, steaks) and processed meat (hot dogs, sausage)
    • margarine, shortening, and lard

    In other words, the North American Diet. Yet in the controlled study I linked, no difference was found between refined flours and whole grains in the inflammatory response. So who put this list together and what was it based on?
    That article mentioned something at the end that I would say is important:
    To explain the mechanisms behind the positive health effects of whole-grain products, as suggested in epidemiological studies, more extensive and controlled dietary studies on different groups of subjects, utilizing different forms of whole grain foods with varying structure, is needed. Ascribing an equal health value to all types of whole-grain products, without regard to the physical structure and type of cereal, may be misleading.

    Some people will say that whole grains (as most people know it today) are not as great due to the preparation methods (common way of preparing them today vs fermentation). On a related note, I think it would be interesting to investigate whether gluten had a role in the outcome of that study. That could be a limiting factor for why there was not a difference in the immune response in that study.

  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,180Member Member Posts: 3,180Member Member
    My GI doesn't recommend fish oil supplements for IBD. Also NSAIDs are off limits most IBD sufferers because of potential GI bleeding and worsening of symptoms when taken.

    I have some IBS like problems and I found fish oil supplements exacerbated or even triggered them. In my case, I think it has to do with bacteria and/or gut flora. My thinking was that the oils were slightly rancid or contaminated. Not enough to affect the average person, but enough to bother me. Fresh, well cooked fish doesn't cause me problems.

  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    I have heard through the IBD community that the supplements can increase symptoms but I have never had issues eating fish either
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