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Anti-inflammatory foods

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  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,179Member Member Posts: 3,179Member Member
    I'd like to try to defend my initial post about probiotics and inflammation/autoimmune diseases. Not much luck with the inflammation portion yet. Here is a study that does talk about inflammation but again only in relation to colo-rectal cancer. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1365-2036.2001.01027.x/full

    I was certain though that autoimmune diseases are affected by gut flora. Here is one talking about "the hygiene hypothesis". I think there are lots like it. Growing up on a farm or even visiting zoos regularly is supposed to be helpful. Not exactly foods but ingested nevertheless. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/apm.12023/full

    Also, here is the link to the article discussing calorie restriction and intermittent fasting on RA and chronic inflammatory diseases http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24434759

    Have to sign off but looking forward to more discussion on the topic (aunt with MS, sister with RA, and various low level problems suspiciously auto immune like myself).
    edited February 2016
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    @goldthistime there is some promising research in regards to MAP (a bacteria found in some milk) in regards to Crohn's disease. I have heard the hygiene hypothesis used in regards to IBD but haven't heard it in regards to other autoimmune diseases ( I have Crohn's so I read a lot of research articles on it)
  • auddiiauddii Posts: 15,410Member Member Posts: 15,410Member Member
    We have a current study at our institution looking at using mangos to treat IBD. It's still way to early in the trial for results though.

    https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02227602?term=Mango+ibd&rank=1
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    Looks interesting. Unfortunately I am classified as severe and probably will never get off my meds (I'm on Remicade-a biologic and azathioprine).


    auddii wrote: »
    We have a current study at our institution looking at using mangos to treat IBD. It's still way to early in the trial for results though.

    https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02227602?term=Mango+ibd&rank=1
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,179Member Member Posts: 3,179Member Member
    @goldthistime there is some promising research in regards to MAP (a bacteria found in some milk) in regards to Crohn's disease. I have heard the hygiene hypothesis used in regards to IBD but haven't heard it in regards to other autoimmune diseases ( I have Crohn's so I read a lot of research articles on it)

    Fascinating stuff. I did a bit of digging around and it looks like they are working on an anti-MAP vaccine. My "uneducated but I will throw it out there anyway" guess would be that there is more than one bacterial culprit involved, with perhaps a structural defect in our intestines that allows these bad bacteria to multiply, but eliminating even a portion of IBD suffering would be brilliant. Do you avoid dairy and beef?

  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,179Member Member Posts: 3,179Member Member
    auddii wrote: »
    We have a current study at our institution looking at using mangos to treat IBD. It's still way to early in the trial for results though.

    https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02227602?term=Mango+ibd&rank=1

    Thanks so much for sharing this.

  • nvmomketonvmomketo Posts: 12,031Member Member Posts: 12,031Member Member
    Wahl's Protocol looks into adding nutrient dense foods while avoiding inflammatory foods, mainly sugars, grains, dairy and starches, to treat autoimmune issues like MS. It's a paleo style diet which appears to be bordering on low carb or is low carb.

    I think she was starting her own trials of the diet.

    http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/TEDxIowaCity-Dr-Terry-Wahls-Min
    http://terrywahls.com/about-the-wahls-protocol/

    A summary of her daily diet:

    3 cups of cruciferous and dark greens

    3 cups intensely coloured: 1 cup red vegetables / fruit, 1 cup blue black vegetables / fruits, 1 cup yellow/orange vegetable / fruits

    3 cups others including: 1 cup mushrooms / onion family (for organic sulphur), and seaweed for iodine and trace minerals.

    (Note: 1 cup = raw vegetables chopped = 1/2 cup cooked, an apple sized fruit, or 2 cups leafy greens)

    Include spices and herbs.

    Omega 3 rich foods, green leaves and animals fed green leaves, wild fish and seafood. And you could add fish oil.

    Eat organ meats once per week

    Regular bone broth

    Fermented foods or a probiotic
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    I have been fascinated by the science behind gut health/bacteria and its role in health overall, especially with inflammation. I think a major reason why there is not much information on it is that it is more so of an emerging area of research, with much more focus now than say 30 years ago. But I think it is very promising.
  • poteatkdpoteatkd Posts: 113Member Member Posts: 113Member Member
    bump to follow
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    @goldthistime there is some promising research in regards to MAP (a bacteria found in some milk) in regards to Crohn's disease. I have heard the hygiene hypothesis used in regards to IBD but haven't heard it in regards to other autoimmune diseases ( I have Crohn's so I read a lot of research articles on it)

    Fascinating stuff. I did a bit of digging around and it looks like they are working on an anti-MAP vaccine. My "uneducated but I will throw it out there anyway" guess would be that there is more than one bacterial culprit involved, with perhaps a structural defect in our intestines that allows these bad bacteria to multiply, but eliminating even a portion of IBD suffering would be brilliant. Do you avoid dairy and beef?

    I'm lactose intolerant and my body cannot handle red meat so yes I do but not to avoid MAP. when I was going through the worst flare-up in my life (was close to perforating) I was on a high protein diet and ate Greek yogurt, cheese and protein powder everyday (with lactose pills) after years of avoiding these products.. I now wonder if this contributed to my bad health. This was pre diagnosis when I thought it was IBS. After the Crohn's diagnosis it was suspected I had a mild form of crohn's for 10+ years that went insane after not being treated. Who knows though. I'm the only one in my family diagnosed with IBD but many others have IBS and gerd perhaps misdiagnosed?
    edited February 2016
  • KimDaniels2KimDaniels2 Posts: 1Member Member Posts: 1Member Member
    NO night shade plants. This includes potatoes, tomatoes, egg plant and peppers (both red and green). I was diagnosed with RA 16 years ago and was on a multitude of prescriptions. After a couple of years with success in keeping my RA symptoms at bay I opted for a more holistic approach. This decision was reached because although my RA symptoms were not present...for the most part, an increase in the enzymes in my liver scared me. That increase was a direct result of just ONE of the medications I was on. I did much google research and read what I thought was yet another crack pot article on RA and night shade plants. After removing night shades from my diet, I have been completely free from prescriptions for over 12 years. I saw my RA doctor for my annual check up this month and all of my blood work was pretty much normal. I have slight levels of inflammation but he does not see the need for any prescriptions. This change in diet along with exercising has kept me flare up free for over 12 years. Is that enough science for you?

    P.S. When I was diagnosed 16 years. I was diagnosed as severe. I could not walk down stairs or even stand for more then 5 minutes at a time. My knuckles in my hands were blue, I had rheumatoid nodules on my elbow and on my wrist. My range of motion was extremely limited. My RA doctor saw a wheelchair in my very near future. Now I walk/jog 4-8 miles a day.
    edited February 2016
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    Wahl's Protocol looks into adding nutrient dense foods while avoiding inflammatory foods, mainly sugars, grains, dairy and starches, to treat autoimmune issues like MS. It's a paleo style diet which appears to be bordering on low carb or is low carb.

    I think she was starting her own trials of the diet.

    http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/TEDxIowaCity-Dr-Terry-Wahls-Min
    http://terrywahls.com/about-the-wahls-protocol/

    A summary of her daily diet:

    3 cups of cruciferous and dark greens

    3 cups intensely coloured: 1 cup red vegetables / fruit, 1 cup blue black vegetables / fruits, 1 cup yellow/orange vegetable / fruits

    3 cups others including: 1 cup mushrooms / onion family (for organic sulphur), and seaweed for iodine and trace minerals.

    (Note: 1 cup = raw vegetables chopped = 1/2 cup cooked, an apple sized fruit, or 2 cups leafy greens)

    Include spices and herbs.

    Omega 3 rich foods, green leaves and animals fed green leaves, wild fish and seafood. And you could add fish oil.

    Eat organ meats once per week

    Regular bone broth

    Fermented foods or a probiotic

    Ugh my body can't handle most of those foods. Crohn's and UC are odd where salad is one of the worst nutritional choices you can make. Some IBDers can handle it but just thinking about eating one gives me abdominal pain.
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    NO night shade plants. This includes potatoes, tomatoes, egg plant and peppers (both red and green). I was diagnosed with RA 16 years ago and was on a multitude of prescriptions. After a couple of years with success in keeping my RA symptoms at bay I opted for a more holistic approach. This decision was reached because although my RA symptoms were not present...for the most part, an increase in the enzymes in my liver scared me. That increase was a direct result of just ONE of the medications I was on. I did much google research and read what I thought was yet another crack pot article on RA and night shade plants. After removing night shades from my diet, I have been completely free from prescriptions for over 12 years. I saw my RA doctor for my annual check up this month and all of my blood work was pretty much normal. I have slight levels of inflammation but he does not see the need for any prescriptions. This change in diet along with exercising has kept me flare up free for over 12 years. Is that enough science for you???

    I agree about the nightshades though sweet potatoes and potatoes are 2 of the 4 vegetables my body can handle and don't bother me that much. Tomatoes on the other hand are killer.
  • Alatariel75Alatariel75 Posts: 17,806Member Member Posts: 17,806Member Member
    This is all very interesting. I note (and again, sceptical of the page) that the Harvard page specifically lists tomatoes as a go-to anti-inflammatory food.
    edited February 2016
  • Loosing63Loosing63 Posts: 672Member Member Posts: 672Member Member
  • Loosing63Loosing63 Posts: 672Member Member Posts: 672Member Member
  • Loosing63Loosing63 Posts: 672Member Member Posts: 672Member Member
    Great article about nightshades and inflammation, with a long list of foods to avoid:
    http://www.sott.net/article/261186-The-link-between-nightshades-chronic-pain-and-inflammation


    edited February 2016
  • auddiiauddii Posts: 15,410Member Member Posts: 15,410Member Member
    Looks interesting. Unfortunately I am classified as severe and probably will never get off my meds (I'm on Remicade-a biologic and azathioprine).


    auddii wrote: »
    We have a current study at our institution looking at using mangos to treat IBD. It's still way to early in the trial for results though.

    https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02227602?term=Mango+ibd&rank=1

    I would think that adding in some foods proven to reduce inflammation in ibd (again, don't know if there's any conclusive evidence) could help in addition to medication. Sorry to hear you have such a severe case, but hopefully you've found a regimen that works to keep your symptoms in check.
  • hopeandtheabsurdhopeandtheabsurd Posts: 265Member Member Posts: 265Member Member
    Tomatoes should not be on an anti-inflammatory list without a boatload of caveats. I wonder if they put these lists together simply looking at things like "hey there are a ton of antioxidants in tomatoes so tomatoes must be awesome!", without taking into account things like the solanine in tomatoes, which can far outweigh the positive benefits of the antioxidants in people sensitive to its effects.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    It seems as if there's unlikely to be foods that are and are not inflammatory (and that it's not clear that it matters for most people). Instead, there are probably foods that interact with particular conditions or tendencies for inflammation, just as there are different reasons for inflammation (some problems, some not).
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