Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Anti-inflammatory foods

124

Replies

  • rainbowbowrainbowbow Posts: 7,497Member Member Posts: 7,497Member Member
    i'd be curious to know if this is something that applies to everyone across the board or if anti inflammatory foods come down to an individual basis.

    I am only questioning this because i want a few tests done (like the ALCAT) as i've seen that some foods may be perfectly fine and others may be poorly tolerated on a case by case basis.

    I have an auto immune disease (sjorgen's syndrome) as well as rosacea both of which can be worsened or even triggered with certain foods. Typically i see things such as curcumin (turmeric) and ginger be recommended and avoiding things that may be inflammatory such as: spicy foods, fried foods, tomatoes, dairy, and chocolate/caffiene. Are these foods simply more likely to cause inflammation in humans in general?

    I haven't found my specific food triggers and i suspect that i likely have many food intolerances going on that i'm eating unawaredly.
  • jgnatcajgnatca Posts: 14,495Member Member Posts: 14,495Member Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    i'd be curious to know if this is something that applies to everyone across the board or if anti inflammatory foods come down to an individual basis.

    I am only questioning this because i want a few tests done (like the ALCAT) as i've seen that some foods may be perfectly fine and others may be poorly tolerated on a case by case basis.

    I have an auto immune disease (sjorgen's syndrome) as well as rosacea both of which can be worsened or even triggered with certain foods. Typically i see things such as curcumin (turmeric) and ginger be recommended and avoiding things that may be inflammatory such as: spicy foods, fried foods, tomatoes, dairy, and chocolate/caffiene. Are these foods simply more likely to cause inflammation in humans in general?

    I haven't found my specific food triggers and i suspect that i likely have many food intolerances going on that i'm eating unawaredly.

    Yes, I think inflammation could be related to an allergic reaction, and that can be highly individual. Migraine sufferers also may be triggered by some known foods and not others. I see the current wisdom is to NOT try and avoid all possible triggers, but if a food is a known culprit, avoid that.

    One way to figure out what is a problem for you is to start with a very bland FODMAP diet and then slowly incorporate foods week by week back in to your diet. If you have a bad reaction one week, you have a clue what food you may need to avoid.

    I figured out I had an allergy to almonds (but no other nuts) by meticulously logging and reviewing my diet. My (family doctor) sister warned me that a food allergy (hives, for me) can show up a couple days after ingestion. So I would have to review everything I ate over the last couple days to see if there was anything new or different I was eating.
  • rainbowbowrainbowbow Posts: 7,497Member Member Posts: 7,497Member Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    i'd be curious to know if this is something that applies to everyone across the board or if anti inflammatory foods come down to an individual basis.

    I am only questioning this because i want a few tests done (like the ALCAT) as i've seen that some foods may be perfectly fine and others may be poorly tolerated on a case by case basis.

    I have an auto immune disease (sjorgen's syndrome) as well as rosacea both of which can be worsened or even triggered with certain foods. Typically i see things such as curcumin (turmeric) and ginger be recommended and avoiding things that may be inflammatory such as: spicy foods, fried foods, tomatoes, dairy, and chocolate/caffiene. Are these foods simply more likely to cause inflammation in humans in general?

    I haven't found my specific food triggers and i suspect that i likely have many food intolerances going on that i'm eating unawaredly.

    Yes, I think inflammation could be related to an allergic reaction, and that can be highly individual. Migraine sufferers also may be triggered by some known foods and not others. I see the current wisdom is to NOT try and avoid all possible triggers, but if a food is a known culprit, avoid that.

    One way to figure out what is a problem for you is to start with a very bland FODMAP diet and then slowly incorporate foods week by week back in to your diet. If you have a bad reaction one week, you have a clue what food you may need to avoid.

    I figured out I had an allergy to almonds (but no other nuts) by meticulously logging and reviewing my diet. My (family doctor) sister warned me that a food allergy (hives, for me) can show up a couple days after ingestion. So I would have to review everything I ate over the last couple days to see if there was anything new or different I was eating.

    Yes, i know i have a few food allergies (hazelnuts and almonds which cause hives and possibly some melons which cause itchiness in my mouth and throat) but i've been really wanting to avoid doing an elimination diet.

    This is mostly because I am a lifelong vegetarian, and i feel like it cuts out a huge part of my already restrictive diet. I guess really, I should plan accordingly and see what happens.

    The thing that REALLY sucks, is that even if a food is tolerated well (stomach wise), It may still be a trigger for my rosacea which means I must be on the lookout for both. I just wish i could go to the doctor, have them prick me a few times, and be like "Here's what you can and can't eat". >_< I don't want to put in the work of eliminating. /lazy

    But it is causing a slew of problems for me like: really bad GERD, constant mucous in back of throat, dry skin, dry eyes, dry mouth, dry hair, brittle nails, skin which breaks out in hives often, flushing/blushing with temperature changes like cold to hot, etc. You'd think this would be enough of a motivator. :expressionless:
  • Roza42Roza42 Posts: 213Member Member Posts: 213Member Member
    My experience is that causes of inflammation are individual. And if you are having chronic issues, I would recommend an elimination diet. I used The Plan, http://lyngenet.com/. It is set up like a scientific experiment where all the variables are controlled.

    For myself, I found out I am allergic to dairy and most nuts. Other causes of inflammation in order of severity are sesame seeds, buckwheat, pineapple, potato and eggplant, legumes (except peanuts), wheat (not gluten), citrus, corn. Other items that don't cause other symptoms, but do cause inflammation are fresh tomatoes and peppers, cucumbers, radishes turkey and some fish. Other things I have tested that don't cause inflammation most grains, eggs, most wheat relatives, butter, cream (unless I drink too much), every type of meat except turkey, veggies and fruit that aren't mentioned above.

    I am no longer red all of the time, I don't have IBD, my joint pain is controlled, and my hair and skin look great.
  • stealthqstealthq Posts: 4,307Member Member Posts: 4,307Member Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    A PI in my department studies the effects of curcurmin (active component) in turmeric in the context of a couple of different cancers, colorectal is his main focus. He's branching out to other diseases.

    Unfortunately, while curcurmin definitely has an anti-inflammatory effect both in vivo and in vitro (shown via microarray as a down-regulation of inflammatory pathway transcripts in blood and the tissue cultures tested), you don't get enough curcurmin from the amounts of turmeric eaten in food to do much of anything. Not even if you eat it at almost every meal.

    If you take turmeric capsules as supplements, there is a real risk of toxicity from overdose of other components of turmeric. You can get curcurmin supplements. Those would be the better choice, but keep in mind that an anti-inflammatory response is not in all cases a good thing. Anti-inflammatories can also impede the body's ability to fight off disease - inflammation is part of that process.

    I know the importance of inflammation but as I said earlier I have Crohn's disease so inflammation is a big problem for me. I will try curcurmin supplements.

    I wasn't addressing anyone in particular, there were several posts that mentioned turmeric so I was providing general info.

    Just FYI - I do know someone who has very severe Crohn's (son of a friend) and he has not had any luck with any anti-inflammatory he tried. He is doing pretty well on a biologic - can't remember the name of it off the top of my head.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    A PI in my department studies the effects of curcurmin (active component) in turmeric in the context of a couple of different cancers, colorectal is his main focus. He's branching out to other diseases.

    Unfortunately, while curcurmin definitely has an anti-inflammatory effect both in vivo and in vitro (shown via microarray as a down-regulation of inflammatory pathway transcripts in blood and the tissue cultures tested), you don't get enough curcurmin from the amounts of turmeric eaten in food to do much of anything. Not even if you eat it at almost every meal.

    If you take turmeric capsules as supplements, there is a real risk of toxicity from overdose of other components of turmeric. You can get curcurmin supplements. Those would be the better choice, but keep in mind that an anti-inflammatory response is not in all cases a good thing. Anti-inflammatories can also impede the body's ability to fight off disease - inflammation is part of that process.

    Indeed. A literature review of saturated fat minimum hypothesized that Paleo's belief that saturated fat is fine because of ancestral levels (whatever that might be) might be misguided. Saturated fat could be pro inflammatory and therefore useful for fighting infections, the more common killer in paleo man.
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    stealthq wrote: »
    A PI in my department studies the effects of curcurmin (active component) in turmeric in the context of a couple of different cancers, colorectal is his main focus. He's branching out to other diseases.

    Unfortunately, while curcurmin definitely has an anti-inflammatory effect both in vivo and in vitro (shown via microarray as a down-regulation of inflammatory pathway transcripts in blood and the tissue cultures tested), you don't get enough curcurmin from the amounts of turmeric eaten in food to do much of anything. Not even if you eat it at almost every meal.

    If you take turmeric capsules as supplements, there is a real risk of toxicity from overdose of other components of turmeric. You can get curcurmin supplements. Those would be the better choice, but keep in mind that an anti-inflammatory response is not in all cases a good thing. Anti-inflammatories can also impede the body's ability to fight off disease - inflammation is part of that process.

    I know the importance of inflammation but as I said earlier I have Crohn's disease so inflammation is a big problem for me. I will try curcurmin supplements.

    I wasn't addressing anyone in particular, there were several posts that mentioned turmeric so I was providing general info.

    Just FYI - I do know someone who has very severe Crohn's (son of a friend) and he has not had any luck with any anti-inflammatory he tried. He is doing pretty well on a biologic - can't remember the name of it off the top of my head.

    Remicade, humira or entyvio? I'm on Remicade. I have had no luck but twillimg to try
  • alasin1derlandalasin1derland Posts: 575Member Member Posts: 575Member Member

    I added that link specifically for people suffering with crohns. I love that this post was started. I think a lot of inflammatory issues can be cured through healthy lifestyle. There probably isn't one cure all, I think its finding out your personal triggers. Everyone is different. I am triggered by refined sugars, potatoes and white flours. Busy lifestyles make it hard to really remove everything and introduce things one at a time to truly find your personal triggers but if you have issues that affect everyday living its so worth it. I also think if there is proven majority triggers, that is probably a good place to start.
  • BoxerBrawlerBoxerBrawler Posts: 1,977Member Member Posts: 1,977Member Member
    Tumeric and just black cherry juice :smile:
  • NaturalNancyNaturalNancy Posts: 1,099Member Member Posts: 1,099Member Member
    Organic tart cherry juice and cinnamon.
  • Alatariel75Alatariel75 Posts: 17,806Member Member Posts: 17,806Member Member
    Tumeric and just black cherry juice :smile:

    How? Why?
    Organic tart cherry juice and cinnamon.

    How? Why?

  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    Tumeric and just black cherry juice :smile:

    How? Why?
    Organic tart cherry juice and cinnamon.

    How? Why?

    e137do9brrrg.jpg
  • DarjaurhzivaDarjaurhziva Posts: 28Member Member Posts: 28Member Member
    Ghee and curcuma mixed together.
  • FunkyTobiasFunkyTobias Posts: 1,776Member Member Posts: 1,776Member Member

    Eureka Alert! Lol, sounds legit

    The second one was a joke. 12 subjects and no blinding.
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,188Member Member Posts: 3,188Member Member

    Eureka Alert! Lol, sounds legit

    The second one was a joke. 12 subjects and no blinding.

    Fair enough. I'll poke around to see if I can find anything more convincing.

    ETA Not as easy as I expected and I'm out of time atm. Here is one about sweet cherries:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23343675

    I'm interested because we buy tart cherry juice on occasion.
    edited March 2016
  • FunkyTobiasFunkyTobias Posts: 1,776Member Member Posts: 1,776Member Member

    Eureka Alert! Lol, sounds legit

    The second one was a joke. 12 subjects and no blinding.

    Fair enough. I'll poke around to see if I can find anything more convincing.

    ETA Not as easy as I expected and I'm out of time atm. Here is one about sweet cherries:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23343675

    I'm interested because we buy tart cherry juice on occasion.

    Better, but still nothing remotely approaching a clinical result.

    It's possible that there is an anti-inflammatory component of cherry juice, but it is unlikely to be in a high enough concentration to have any real result.
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,188Member Member Posts: 3,188Member Member
    I'm impressed that you took the time to review. A lot of the discussion points to a 1950's study that I'm having trouble finding the text of: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14776685

    What surprises (and disappoints) me is that researchers often cite the anti inflammatory properties of cherries without even providing links, as though it is a known fact, no evidence required.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    I'm impressed that you took the time to review. A lot of the discussion points to a 1950's study that I'm having trouble finding the text of: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14776685

    What surprises (and disappoints) me is that researchers often cite the anti inflammatory properties of cherries without even providing links, as though it is a known fact, no evidence required.

    When clinicians and researchers sound like Dothraki, there's a problem
    53532811.jpg
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    i'd be curious to know if this is something that applies to everyone across the board or if anti inflammatory foods come down to an individual basis.

    I am only questioning this because i want a few tests done (like the ALCAT) as i've seen that some foods may be perfectly fine and others may be poorly tolerated on a case by case basis.

    I have an auto immune disease (sjorgen's syndrome) as well as rosacea both of which can be worsened or even triggered with certain foods. Typically i see things such as curcumin (turmeric) and ginger be recommended and avoiding things that may be inflammatory such as: spicy foods, fried foods, tomatoes, dairy, and chocolate/caffiene. Are these foods simply more likely to cause inflammation in humans in general?

    I haven't found my specific food triggers and i suspect that i likely have many food intolerances going on that i'm eating unawaredly.

    @rainbowbow from my personal experience I think very few things applies to everyone when it comes to diet. In my case when I cut all carbs to less than 50 grams daily and held protein down to 70-90 grams daily and made up the rest of my calories from fats (avoiding any from grains like soybeans/sunflower/etc) my joint and muscle pain of 40 year duration dropped from a subjective 7-8 level to 2-3 in just 30 days. 1.5 years later the pain is still low, I am down 50 pounds and my IBS left after the 1st six month of eating this way and so far has not returned.

    A food that is bad for me may be good for another and the other way around.

    I am heavy into fried bacon, eggs, sausages, dairy (as in Heavy Whipping Cream, cheeses and the like but not so much in high lactose forms) plus a lot of cocoa and regular coffee along with nuts like almonds, cashews, macadamia. 80% of my 2200-2500 calories daily come from fats hence this example list of foods.

    At age 65 currently my health and health markers are better then when I was 45. I do not know why carbs do such a number on my health and others can seem to eat them just fine.
    edited March 2016
Sign In or Register to comment.