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Probiotics

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  • puffbratpuffbrat Posts: 2,428Member Member Posts: 2,428Member Member
    I have had a perpetual yeast infection for over 15 years. Nothing the doctors have prescribed have gotten rid of. I have followed every piece of advice given. Eating yogurt regularly and taking acidophilus pills every day is only thing that keeps it at a liveable level.
  • G33K_G1RLG33K_G1RL Posts: 283Member Member Posts: 283Member Member
    rhtexasgal wrote: »
    G33K_G1RL wrote: »
    I never took probiotics in a pill, but I included fermented foods when I started my weightloss. In addition to all the previously mentioned benefits, I noticed less of a tolerance for very sweet food (candy, maple syrup and their ilk). After a portion or so I just can't tolerate another bite.

    I make my own sauerkraut, kefir and fermented carrots. I occasionally buy kombucha, but haven't ventured in making my own yet.

    I have found that the more I consume fermented foods and kombucha, the less bloating I get with "trigger" foods like my occasional fried shrimp or eating bread. I also feel more energetic. I also noticed like you a lower tolerance to very sweet foods. I had a waffle last week and put syrup on it ... I ended up scraping half of it off because it was just "too much" whereas before I would saturated the waffle.

    Look into making your own kombucha ... we make two gallons a week at home since I have two teenage boys, and it is quite easy. You can find someone to give you part of a scoby to start or you can purchase kits I believe. We experiment by adding different flavored organic juices and fermenting for different period of times. I like mine a little tarter than the rest of my family (which also means it contains less sugar and more good bacteria).

    So glad to hear that someone else saw the same effect of fermented foods lowering the sweet tolerance!

    The brand of kombucha I buy (Rise) has a how-to to make a scoby out of their kombucha. Might give it a try and start one this weekend. What type of container to you use for the fermenting process? And do you give them a carbonation period?
  • pondee629pondee629 Posts: 2,360Member Member Posts: 2,360Member Member
    My husband says they aren't probiotics unless they are getting paid to biotic. Otherwise they are amateur biotics.

    Actually; ambiotics. As in ProAm.
  • rhtexasgalrhtexasgal Posts: 541Member Member Posts: 541Member Member
    G33K_G1RL wrote: »
    rhtexasgal wrote: »
    G33K_G1RL wrote: »
    I never took probiotics in a pill, but I included fermented foods when I started my weightloss. In addition to all the previously mentioned benefits, I noticed less of a tolerance for very sweet food (candy, maple syrup and their ilk). After a portion or so I just can't tolerate another bite.

    I make my own sauerkraut, kefir and fermented carrots. I occasionally buy kombucha, but haven't ventured in making my own yet.

    I have found that the more I consume fermented foods and kombucha, the less bloating I get with "trigger" foods like my occasional fried shrimp or eating bread. I also feel more energetic. I also noticed like you a lower tolerance to very sweet foods. I had a waffle last week and put syrup on it ... I ended up scraping half of it off because it was just "too much" whereas before I would saturated the waffle.

    Look into making your own kombucha ... we make two gallons a week at home since I have two teenage boys, and it is quite easy. You can find someone to give you part of a scoby to start or you can purchase kits I believe. We experiment by adding different flavored organic juices and fermenting for different period of times. I like mine a little tarter than the rest of my family (which also means it contains less sugar and more good bacteria).

    So glad to hear that someone else saw the same effect of fermented foods lowering the sweet tolerance!

    The brand of kombucha I buy (Rise) has a how-to to make a scoby out of their kombucha. Might give it a try and start one this weekend. What type of container to you use for the fermenting process? And do you give them a carbonation period?

    My hubby typically makes the kombucha but I believe the fermentation is about 4-6- days, depending on how strong you want it AND the conditions in which it is kept (we keep ours on the kitchen counter, away from the stove but room temperature). We have two gallon size glass jars that we use but instead of using their lids, we use a coffee filter secured by rubber bands because we found that the kombucha needs to "breathe" a bit; otherwise the scoby will truly grow out of control. Once done, we transfer all but two cups into a pitcher and flavor with an organic juice. Then we leave the mixture out overnight to ferment again with the juice and then bottle in glass bottles (found at Target) and refrigerate. There are some other things I am forgetting but that is the gist of it. We typically use regular black tea bags to make the stuff but occasionally we will use flavored tea bags (just have to add extras). Peach is a favorite.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    For those that take probiotics, do you take them in the recommended amount? The one I take claims to have 20 billion cultures and it says to take 2 a day, so that would be 14 a week.
  • clhoward6clhoward6 Posts: 53Member, Premium Member Posts: 53Member, Premium Member
    While I love fermented foods, and most people are fine, be aware of any reactions as fermentation can increase the histamine levels in food and cause some interesting side effects.
  • BinaryPulsarBinaryPulsar Posts: 9,068Member Member Posts: 9,068Member Member
    clhoward6 wrote: »
    While I love fermented foods, and most people are fine, be aware of any reactions as fermentation can increase the histamine levels in food and cause some interesting side effects.

    Yes. This happens to me. I have histamine sensitivity and a gut microbiome imbalance. So, I have to juggle the two issues. It's awful when my histamine levels get too high. But, also awful when my gut issue is unmanaged. So, I always need moderation and balance.
  • BinaryPulsarBinaryPulsar Posts: 9,068Member Member Posts: 9,068Member Member
    For those that take probiotics, do you take them in the recommended amount? The one I take claims to have 20 billion cultures and it says to take 2 a day, so that would be 14 a week.

    I think it depends on if you have gut symptoms or recent antibiotic use. Etc. They sell probiotics with 150 billion per pill.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    For those that take probiotics, do you take them in the recommended amount? The one I take claims to have 20 billion cultures and it says to take 2 a day, so that would be 14 a week.

    I think it depends on if you have gut symptoms or recent antibiotic use. Etc. They sell probiotics with 150 billion per pill.
    Ok. I'm considering increasing the dosage of what I'm taking (I'm taking 4 a week). It just seemed excessive to me to take 14 a week, but maybe part of the reason I haven't noticed major changes is because the dosage is too low to really strengthen my gut from whatever I'm eating that is bothering it.

  • rhtexasgalrhtexasgal Posts: 541Member Member Posts: 541Member Member
    For those that take probiotics, do you take them in the recommended amount? The one I take claims to have 20 billion cultures and it says to take 2 a day, so that would be 14 a week.

    I think it depends on if you have gut symptoms or recent antibiotic use. Etc. They sell probiotics with 150 billion per pill.
    Ok. I'm considering increasing the dosage of what I'm taking (I'm taking 4 a week). It just seemed excessive to me to take 14 a week, but maybe part of the reason I haven't noticed major changes is because the dosage is too low to really strengthen my gut from whatever I'm eating that is bothering it.

    My probiotic also says to take 2 a day. However, I take only 1 a day because of two things: 1) the stuff is expensive! and 2) I make sure I eat fermented foods every day which makes up for not taking that second probiotic.

    Now when I was still in recovery from ulcerative colitis (now in remission), I took the full amount and then tapered off once I started feeling better and my gut just seemed to be recovering. Because my boys tend to have bowel issues if they take antibiotics, I do have them up their dosage of probiotics to the full amount (2x a day) for the length of the antibiotic treatment plus about 5 days since antibiotics lingers in the system. After that, they also go back to 1x a day. Of course, they do not take the strong one I take (85 billion count) ... they take the 500 million count which is cheaper but still effective for them.
  • BinaryPulsarBinaryPulsar Posts: 9,068Member Member Posts: 9,068Member Member
    For those that take probiotics, do you take them in the recommended amount? The one I take claims to have 20 billion cultures and it says to take 2 a day, so that would be 14 a week.

    I think it depends on if you have gut symptoms or recent antibiotic use. Etc. They sell probiotics with 150 billion per pill.
    Ok. I'm considering increasing the dosage of what I'm taking (I'm taking 4 a week). It just seemed excessive to me to take 14 a week, but maybe part of the reason I haven't noticed major changes is because the dosage is too low to really strengthen my gut from whatever I'm eating that is bothering it.

    I think the current general recommendation is 50 billion a day at least.
  • BinaryPulsarBinaryPulsar Posts: 9,068Member Member Posts: 9,068Member Member
    A book I found helpful is The Microbiome Solution by Robynne Chutkan. Now, she recommends eating quinoa. I loved quinoa. But, I can't digest it. I don't know if this is permanent or temporary due to antibiotic injury. But, basically dietary suggestions are just suggestions and it can vary per person. In general the book is extensive and excellent info and very interesting! She is a GI specialist.
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,630Member Member Posts: 7,630Member Member
    bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-14/how-gut-bacteria-are-shaking-up-cancer-research

    Gut flora is getting a lot of attention. I started on probiotics last year.
  • bspanther71bspanther71 Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
    I've been taking antibiotics on and off since December....which has resulted in extra infections(women know what I mean)...I have a feeling I will be put back on them again this week' Does anyone know, if I took a probiotic, would this avoid those infections? I'm dreading going back to the doctor just thinking about it....

    Yes, taking a probiotic will probably help. When I was deployed to Afghanistan, we were given an antibiotic anti-malarial for the entire year. At the same time, I took acidophilous and was able to avoid the additional infections that many of my fellow female Soldiers suffered.
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    I don't know. I take a probiotic, and can now eat a lot more vegetables without horrendous pain and indigestion, but maybe that's because I've been eating more vegetables, as I've found myself able to tolerate more vegetables. I don't have them on hand - I read a few studies in which what the experimental subjects ate started to affect their gut microbiota very quickly, in less than a day.

    If you've ever tried to read some papers to figure out the best probiotic to take, and the best dosage, then tried to find that probiotic, at the same dosage, you'll know why I throw my hands up and say "I don't know."
  • BinaryPulsarBinaryPulsar Posts: 9,068Member Member Posts: 9,068Member Member
    Another option to try is eating prebiotic foods that feed the probiotics you already have in your intestines.
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    Another option to try is eating prebiotic foods that feed the probiotics you already have in your intestines.

    Resistant starch in the form of unmodified potato starch, and small servings of raw soaked oatmeal, has been working for me. I had to start with 1/4 teaspoon. The first time I had potato starch, I did a teaspoon, leading to pain... :(
    edited March 2016
  • BinaryPulsarBinaryPulsar Posts: 9,068Member Member Posts: 9,068Member Member
    lithezebra wrote: »
    Another option to try is eating prebiotic foods that feed the probiotics you already have in your intestines.

    Resistant starch in the form of unmodified potato starch, and small servings of raw soaked oatmeal, has been working for me. I had to start with 1/4 teaspoon. The first time I had potato starch, I did a teaspoon, leading to pain... :(

    I just added raw unmodified potato starch. I eat a green banana or plantain. I also added leeks. And I am going to try parsnips. Another thing I might try is acacia fiber. There are a lot of potential options. I also have to be cautious about food reactions either my gut or nerve pain in my face that increases from food reactions. Not sure if I can tolerate oatmeal again yet. But, I might try it at some point. Parboiled and cooled rice is potentially another option. My gut does not handle grains well. Quinoa was actually the worst.
    edited March 2016
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    lithezebra wrote: »
    Another option to try is eating prebiotic foods that feed the probiotics you already have in your intestines.

    Resistant starch in the form of unmodified potato starch, and small servings of raw soaked oatmeal, has been working for me. I had to start with 1/4 teaspoon. The first time I had potato starch, I did a teaspoon, leading to pain... :(
    lithezebra wrote: »
    Another option to try is eating prebiotic foods that feed the probiotics you already have in your intestines.

    Resistant starch in the form of unmodified potato starch, and small servings of raw soaked oatmeal, has been working for me. I had to start with 1/4 teaspoon. The first time I had potato starch, I did a teaspoon, leading to pain... :(

    I just added raw unmodified potato starch. I eat a green banana or plantain. I also added leeks. And I am going to try parsnips. Another thing I might try is acacia fiber. There are a lot of potential options. I also have to be cautious about food reactions either my gut or nerve pain in my face that increases from food reactions. Not sure if I can tolerate oatmeal again yet. But, I might try it at some point. Parboiled and cooled rice is potentially another option. My gut does not handle grains well. Quinoa was actually the worst.

    I empathize. My gut didn't like fiber for a while. The very worst was coconut flour. I have the potato starch, my probiotic, and a serving of vegetables together, in hopes that the probiotic can hitch a ride on the starch and fiber to the large intestine, and not settle down in the small intestine, where it doesn't really belong.
  • BinaryPulsarBinaryPulsar Posts: 9,068Member Member Posts: 9,068Member Member
    lithezebra wrote: »
    lithezebra wrote: »
    Another option to try is eating prebiotic foods that feed the probiotics you already have in your intestines.

    Resistant starch in the form of unmodified potato starch, and small servings of raw soaked oatmeal, has been working for me. I had to start with 1/4 teaspoon. The first time I had potato starch, I did a teaspoon, leading to pain... :(
    lithezebra wrote: »
    Another option to try is eating prebiotic foods that feed the probiotics you already have in your intestines.

    Resistant starch in the form of unmodified potato starch, and small servings of raw soaked oatmeal, has been working for me. I had to start with 1/4 teaspoon. The first time I had potato starch, I did a teaspoon, leading to pain... :(

    I just added raw unmodified potato starch. I eat a green banana or plantain. I also added leeks. And I am going to try parsnips. Another thing I might try is acacia fiber. There are a lot of potential options. I also have to be cautious about food reactions either my gut or nerve pain in my face that increases from food reactions. Not sure if I can tolerate oatmeal again yet. But, I might try it at some point. Parboiled and cooled rice is potentially another option. My gut does not handle grains well. Quinoa was actually the worst.

    I empathize. My gut didn't like fiber for a while. The very worst was coconut flour. I have the potato starch, my probiotic, and a serving of vegetables together, in hopes that the probiotic can hitch a ride on the starch and fiber to the large intestine, and not settle down in the small intestine, where it doesn't really belong.

    Me too. I combine the potato starch, veggies, and probiotic. I take Progressive HCP150. It claims to have human strains. And it's 150 billion. I also eat wildbrine sauerkraut and kefir.
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