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Full or low fat dairy?

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  • J72FITJ72FIT Posts: 5,292Member Member Posts: 5,292Member Member
    If your weight loss is stalling it is not mean for sure that your diet that is the culprit. You may be overestimating your burn in exercise. On the dairy front if you choose to consume low fat you could be missing out on important nutrition that comes from full fat dairy. Low fat versions are still better than not consuming any dairy for fewer calories. Just make the decision based on your own preferences.

    Other than fat, what important nutrients are present in full fat dairy and not in lowfat?

    I think she means the fat in dairy can help in the absorption of fat soluble vitamins. IMO though, as long as you have adequate fat in your diet it won't matter...
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    What I meant to say is that the fatty acids scraped from the low fat versions can assist with feeling fuller for longer. It can assist with hormone regulation also.

    I'd have to confess
    08966e91eda47bbe87ab41c692cd4244.jpg
  • DizzyMissIzzyDizzyMissIzzy Posts: 168Member, Premium Member Posts: 168Member, Premium Member
    I was actually about to post something about this in the forum but you beat me to it OP!

    I love seeing people's thoughts on this. I was just reading an article, not really a reliable reference in itself, but it uses a lot of reputable references listed below (in the form of academic journals and encyclopedias etc), so I have some degree of faith in it!

    Here's what it said about fat percentage:
    " Provided that you keep your serving size for grass-fed cow's milk at 4 ounces or less, we recommend that you consume it in the form of whole milk. Not only is whole milk the least processed form of milk (placing it in the category of a whole, natural food), it's also the form of grass-fed milk that will provide you with the most omega-3s and other key nutrients. Traditionally, health organizations have not recommended whole milk in the diet but rather reduced fat milk, including 2%, skim, and nonfat milk. Since too much total fat, too much saturated fat, and too many calories in a daily meal plan can raise the risk of certain health problems, this traditional approach makes sense for individuals who cannot make room in their daily meal plan for the amount of total fat, saturated fat, and calories contained in whole milk. However, we believe that many people who may want to include a 4-ounce serving of grass-fed milk in their meal plan will be able to include it in the form of whole milk while still remaining within the guidelines for intake of total fat, saturated fat, and calories."
    ETA: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=130

    Also, the more natural and organic the milk is, apparently the more CLA it has, which is useful as it has been know to help maintain ideal weight and blood sugar!
    edited March 2016
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    I was actually about to post something about this in the forum but you beat me to it OP!

    I love seeing people's thoughts on this. I was just reading an article, not really a reliable reference in itself, but it uses a lot of reputable references listed below (in the form of academic journals and encyclopedias etc), so I have some degree of faith in it!

    Here's what it said about fat percentage:
    " Provided that you keep your serving size for grass-fed cow's milk at 4 ounces or less, we recommend that you consume it in the form of whole milk. Not only is whole milk the least processed form of milk (placing it in the category of a whole, natural food), it's also the form of grass-fed milk that will provide you with the most omega-3s and other key nutrients. Traditionally, health organizations have not recommended whole milk in the diet but rather reduced fat milk, including 2%, skim, and nonfat milk. Since too much total fat, too much saturated fat, and too many calories in a daily meal plan can raise the risk of certain health problems, this traditional approach makes sense for individuals who cannot make room in their daily meal plan for the amount of total fat, saturated fat, and calories contained in whole milk. However, we believe that many people who may want to include a 4-ounce serving of grass-fed milk in their meal plan will be able to include it in the form of whole milk while still remaining within the guidelines for intake of total fat, saturated fat, and calories."

    Also, the more natural and organic the milk is, apparently the more CLA it has, which is useful as it has been know to help maintain ideal weight and blood sugar!

    CLA appears helpful ... rats. If you're really interested in getting more from food, I think goat and sheep milk is higher.
    Grass feed beef and milk don't seem to have an appreciable amount of omega-3's. It is something on the level of 160 mg ( .16% of a gram) in a 4 oz serving of beef.
  • DizzyMissIzzyDizzyMissIzzy Posts: 168Member, Premium Member Posts: 168Member, Premium Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    I was actually about to post something about this in the forum but you beat me to it OP!

    I love seeing people's thoughts on this. I was just reading an article, not really a reliable reference in itself, but it uses a lot of reputable references listed below (in the form of academic journals and encyclopedias etc), so I have some degree of faith in it!

    Here's what it said about fat percentage:
    " Provided that you keep your serving size for grass-fed cow's milk at 4 ounces or less, we recommend that you consume it in the form of whole milk. Not only is whole milk the least processed form of milk (placing it in the category of a whole, natural food), it's also the form of grass-fed milk that will provide you with the most omega-3s and other key nutrients. Traditionally, health organizations have not recommended whole milk in the diet but rather reduced fat milk, including 2%, skim, and nonfat milk. Since too much total fat, too much saturated fat, and too many calories in a daily meal plan can raise the risk of certain health problems, this traditional approach makes sense for individuals who cannot make room in their daily meal plan for the amount of total fat, saturated fat, and calories contained in whole milk. However, we believe that many people who may want to include a 4-ounce serving of grass-fed milk in their meal plan will be able to include it in the form of whole milk while still remaining within the guidelines for intake of total fat, saturated fat, and calories."

    Also, the more natural and organic the milk is, apparently the more CLA it has, which is useful as it has been know to help maintain ideal weight and blood sugar!

    CLA appears helpful ... rats. If you're really interested in getting more from food, I think goat and sheep milk is higher.
    Grass feed beef and milk don't seem to have an appreciable amount of omega-3's. It is something on the level of 160 mg ( .16% of a gram) in a 4 oz serving of beef.

    Haha, CLA from natural sources is good, though I definitely don't believe in the woo that comes from the supplements. They just make me sick to my stomach.
    That is true! I love goat cheese too, mmmm. That's definitely interesting, I'll have to try! I'm always down to get more from what I eat!
  • MsAmandaNJMsAmandaNJ Posts: 1,263Member Member Posts: 1,263Member Member
    I was raised on skim milk. I could drink 1%, but not 2% and certainly not whole, otherwise I'd have to claim the bathroom as my very own. I can eat higher fat cheeses, but not too much. Low-cal cheese is not worth eating, in my opinion. Yogurt can be full fat, my body seems happy with real yogurt.
    edited March 2016
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Posts: 13,589Member Member Posts: 13,589Member Member
    What I meant to say is that the fatty acids scraped from the low fat versions can assist with feeling fuller for longer. It can assist with hormone regulation also.

    OIC I'm not convinced that dairy is the best source of fat, but I do agree that getting enough fat is important. Luckily I don't have to look to dairy for fat because I hate milk. But fat is never a problem for me, other than trying not to overeat it, that is. ;)
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    I was actually about to post something about this in the forum but you beat me to it OP!

    I love seeing people's thoughts on this. I was just reading an article, not really a reliable reference in itself, but it uses a lot of reputable references listed below (in the form of academic journals and encyclopedias etc), so I have some degree of faith in it!

    Here's what it said about fat percentage:
    " Provided that you keep your serving size for grass-fed cow's milk at 4 ounces or less, we recommend that you consume it in the form of whole milk. Not only is whole milk the least processed form of milk (placing it in the category of a whole, natural food), it's also the form of grass-fed milk that will provide you with the most omega-3s and other key nutrients. Traditionally, health organizations have not recommended whole milk in the diet but rather reduced fat milk, including 2%, skim, and nonfat milk. Since too much total fat, too much saturated fat, and too many calories in a daily meal plan can raise the risk of certain health problems, this traditional approach makes sense for individuals who cannot make room in their daily meal plan for the amount of total fat, saturated fat, and calories contained in whole milk. However, we believe that many people who may want to include a 4-ounce serving of grass-fed milk in their meal plan will be able to include it in the form of whole milk while still remaining within the guidelines for intake of total fat, saturated fat, and calories."

    Also, the more natural and organic the milk is, apparently the more CLA it has, which is useful as it has been know to help maintain ideal weight and blood sugar!

    CLA appears helpful ... rats. If you're really interested in getting more from food, I think goat and sheep milk is higher.
    Grass feed beef and milk don't seem to have an appreciable amount of omega-3's. It is something on the level of 160 mg ( .16% of a gram) in a 4 oz serving of beef.

    Haha, CLA from natural sources is good, though I definitely don't believe in the woo that comes from the supplements. They just make me sick to my stomach.
    That is true! I love goat cheese too, mmmm. That's definitely interesting, I'll have to try! I'm always down to get more from what I eat!

    CLA is the same fatty acid regardless of where it comes from. Neither way of attaining it has much evidence for it having beneficial effects in humans. Examine.com has a pretty thorough discussion of it.
  • DizzyMissIzzyDizzyMissIzzy Posts: 168Member, Premium Member Posts: 168Member, Premium Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    I was actually about to post something about this in the forum but you beat me to it OP!

    I love seeing people's thoughts on this. I was just reading an article, not really a reliable reference in itself, but it uses a lot of reputable references listed below (in the form of academic journals and encyclopedias etc), so I have some degree of faith in it!

    Here's what it said about fat percentage:
    " Provided that you keep your serving size for grass-fed cow's milk at 4 ounces or less, we recommend that you consume it in the form of whole milk. Not only is whole milk the least processed form of milk (placing it in the category of a whole, natural food), it's also the form of grass-fed milk that will provide you with the most omega-3s and other key nutrients. Traditionally, health organizations have not recommended whole milk in the diet but rather reduced fat milk, including 2%, skim, and nonfat milk. Since too much total fat, too much saturated fat, and too many calories in a daily meal plan can raise the risk of certain health problems, this traditional approach makes sense for individuals who cannot make room in their daily meal plan for the amount of total fat, saturated fat, and calories contained in whole milk. However, we believe that many people who may want to include a 4-ounce serving of grass-fed milk in their meal plan will be able to include it in the form of whole milk while still remaining within the guidelines for intake of total fat, saturated fat, and calories."

    Also, the more natural and organic the milk is, apparently the more CLA it has, which is useful as it has been know to help maintain ideal weight and blood sugar!

    CLA appears helpful ... rats. If you're really interested in getting more from food, I think goat and sheep milk is higher.
    Grass feed beef and milk don't seem to have an appreciable amount of omega-3's. It is something on the level of 160 mg ( .16% of a gram) in a 4 oz serving of beef.

    Haha, CLA from natural sources is good, though I definitely don't believe in the woo that comes from the supplements. They just make me sick to my stomach.
    That is true! I love goat cheese too, mmmm. That's definitely interesting, I'll have to try! I'm always down to get more from what I eat!

    CLA is the same fatty acid regardless of where it comes from. Neither way of attaining it has much evidence for it having beneficial effects in humans. Examine.com has a pretty thorough discussion of it.
    Could you link the discussion? I'd be interested in reading about it and seeing what resources it uses! I love learning more about things. Though I'd argue that obtaining anything naturally is better than taking a supplement, as it has been proven that supplements don't always contain what they say they do, and also have added coatings and fillers.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    I was actually about to post something about this in the forum but you beat me to it OP!

    I love seeing people's thoughts on this. I was just reading an article, not really a reliable reference in itself, but it uses a lot of reputable references listed below (in the form of academic journals and encyclopedias etc), so I have some degree of faith in it!

    Here's what it said about fat percentage:
    " Provided that you keep your serving size for grass-fed cow's milk at 4 ounces or less, we recommend that you consume it in the form of whole milk. Not only is whole milk the least processed form of milk (placing it in the category of a whole, natural food), it's also the form of grass-fed milk that will provide you with the most omega-3s and other key nutrients. Traditionally, health organizations have not recommended whole milk in the diet but rather reduced fat milk, including 2%, skim, and nonfat milk. Since too much total fat, too much saturated fat, and too many calories in a daily meal plan can raise the risk of certain health problems, this traditional approach makes sense for individuals who cannot make room in their daily meal plan for the amount of total fat, saturated fat, and calories contained in whole milk. However, we believe that many people who may want to include a 4-ounce serving of grass-fed milk in their meal plan will be able to include it in the form of whole milk while still remaining within the guidelines for intake of total fat, saturated fat, and calories."

    Also, the more natural and organic the milk is, apparently the more CLA it has, which is useful as it has been know to help maintain ideal weight and blood sugar!

    CLA appears helpful ... rats. If you're really interested in getting more from food, I think goat and sheep milk is higher.
    Grass feed beef and milk don't seem to have an appreciable amount of omega-3's. It is something on the level of 160 mg ( .16% of a gram) in a 4 oz serving of beef.

    Haha, CLA from natural sources is good, though I definitely don't believe in the woo that comes from the supplements. They just make me sick to my stomach.
    That is true! I love goat cheese too, mmmm. That's definitely interesting, I'll have to try! I'm always down to get more from what I eat!

    CLA is the same fatty acid regardless of where it comes from. Neither way of attaining it has much evidence for it having beneficial effects in humans. Examine.com has a pretty thorough discussion of it.
    Could you link the discussion? I'd be interested in reading about it and seeing what resources it uses! I love learning more about things. Though I'd argue that obtaining anything naturally is better than taking a supplement, as it has been proven that supplements don't always contain what they say they do, and also have added coatings and fillers.
    http://examine.com/supplements/Conjugated+Linoleic+Acid/
    I'm pretty sure food manufacturers can lie about the food they're selling too, though quality control is generally higher than the supplement industry.
  • lisawinning4losinglisawinning4losing Posts: 732Member Member Posts: 732Member Member
    I don't think low fat is that much more processed than full fat other than they had to go through the process of removing fat, unless they added sugars or artificial sweeteners and things to make up for the taste. And preservatives and all that. I used to try to do lowish fat and lowish carb just to keep my overall calorie count down, but now that I'm trying LCHF, I'm switching to full fat. I think it will be more satisfying. But I don't really eat that much dairy anyway.

    But yeah, full fat is going to have more calories, and stuff like cheese and yogurt adds up really, really fast.
    edited March 2016
  • DizzyMissIzzyDizzyMissIzzy Posts: 168Member, Premium Member Posts: 168Member, Premium Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    I was actually about to post something about this in the forum but you beat me to it OP!

    I love seeing people's thoughts on this. I was just reading an article, not really a reliable reference in itself, but it uses a lot of reputable references listed below (in the form of academic journals and encyclopedias etc), so I have some degree of faith in it!

    Here's what it said about fat percentage:
    " Provided that you keep your serving size for grass-fed cow's milk at 4 ounces or less, we recommend that you consume it in the form of whole milk. Not only is whole milk the least processed form of milk (placing it in the category of a whole, natural food), it's also the form of grass-fed milk that will provide you with the most omega-3s and other key nutrients. Traditionally, health organizations have not recommended whole milk in the diet but rather reduced fat milk, including 2%, skim, and nonfat milk. Since too much total fat, too much saturated fat, and too many calories in a daily meal plan can raise the risk of certain health problems, this traditional approach makes sense for individuals who cannot make room in their daily meal plan for the amount of total fat, saturated fat, and calories contained in whole milk. However, we believe that many people who may want to include a 4-ounce serving of grass-fed milk in their meal plan will be able to include it in the form of whole milk while still remaining within the guidelines for intake of total fat, saturated fat, and calories."

    Also, the more natural and organic the milk is, apparently the more CLA it has, which is useful as it has been know to help maintain ideal weight and blood sugar!

    CLA appears helpful ... rats. If you're really interested in getting more from food, I think goat and sheep milk is higher.
    Grass feed beef and milk don't seem to have an appreciable amount of omega-3's. It is something on the level of 160 mg ( .16% of a gram) in a 4 oz serving of beef.

    Haha, CLA from natural sources is good, though I definitely don't believe in the woo that comes from the supplements. They just make me sick to my stomach.
    That is true! I love goat cheese too, mmmm. That's definitely interesting, I'll have to try! I'm always down to get more from what I eat!

    CLA is the same fatty acid regardless of where it comes from. Neither way of attaining it has much evidence for it having beneficial effects in humans. Examine.com has a pretty thorough discussion of it.
    Could you link the discussion? I'd be interested in reading about it and seeing what resources it uses! I love learning more about things. Though I'd argue that obtaining anything naturally is better than taking a supplement, as it has been proven that supplements don't always contain what they say they do, and also have added coatings and fillers.
    http://examine.com/supplements/Conjugated+Linoleic+Acid/
    I'm pretty sure food manufacturers can lie about the food they're selling too, though quality control is generally higher than the supplement industry.

    Very true. Much higher! Obviously there are things that slip through the cracks, but at least a good amount of food is monitored by the FDA while supplements mostly are not regulated at all. Checking the article out now, thank you very much!
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    I don't think low fat is that much more processed than full fat other than they had to go through the process of removing fat, unless they added sugars or artificial sweeteners and things to make up for the taste. And preservatives and all that. I used to try to do lowish fat and lowish carb just to keep my overall calorie count down, but now that I'm trying LCHF, I'm switching to full fat. I think it will be more satisfying. But I don't really eat that much dairy anyway.

    But yeah, full fat is going to have more calories, and stuff like cheese and yogurt adds up really, really fast.

    How about Fairlife?
  • shrinkinglettersshrinkingletters Posts: 1,008Member Member Posts: 1,008Member Member
    Personal choice. If I'm drinking milk or eating cereal, I like 2%, because something about chugging the full-fat gives me a weird mouth-feel and I don't like it. Otherwise I cook with butter, cream, etc.
  • carolynrickettcarolynrickett Posts: 1Member Member Posts: 1Member Member
    If you go low fat or fat free on Anything, just make sure to read the label and make sure they aren't just replacing the fat with tons of sugar. (Read the ingredients for hidden sugars too) More calories made up of natural fats is way better for you and better for weight loss than less calories made up of sugar.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 36,790Member Member Posts: 36,790Member Member
    I can't believe so many people think there is added sugar in low fat dairy...mind blown....
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,100Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,100Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I can't believe so many people think there is added sugar in low fat dairy...mind blown....

    I cant believe people like drinking full fat milk.. its like drinking lard... only thing worst is cottage cheese. Its like eating vomit.
    edited April 2016
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,424Member Member Posts: 24,424Member Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I can't believe so many people think there is added sugar in low fat dairy...mind blown....

    I cant believe people like drinking full fat milk.. its like drinking lard... only thing worst is cottage cheese. Its like eating vomit.

    Can't touch that.
    edited April 2016
  • trjjoytrjjoy Posts: 653Member Member Posts: 653Member Member
    Full cream dairy all the way!
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