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research: high-fat low-carb diets could mean significant heart risk

ndj1979ndj1979 Posts: 29,021Member Member Posts: 29,021Member Member
I found this article interesting and it links to the study referenced. Here is a snippet:

The research study, conducted among a group of obese pre-diabetic adults, compared the results of following a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet (20% fat, 60% carbohydrate) with a high-fat low-carbohydrate diet (60% fat, 20% carbohydrate). It showed that in all areas, other than the risk of cardiovascular disease, the diets have equal health benefits. The same amount of weight is lost; there is no significant difference in the body’s glucose uptake or production; and meal tolerance-related insulin secretion is comparable. However, the study revealed a significant difference in overall systemic arterial stiffness and pointed to increased cardiovascular risk factors from high-fat low-carbohydrate diets.

Interesting, as our LCHF friends like to tell us that there is absolutely no reason to worry about exceeding your fat minimum by 50% of the RDA; however, don't eat carbs because those are bad and will lead to weight gain.

Link to full article:
http://www.sugarnutrition.org.uk/news/new-research-high-fat-low-carb-diets-could-mean-significant-heart-risk/
Link to Study (at bottom of article)
http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2009/08/23/db09-0098.abstract

discuss…..
edited March 2016
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Replies

  • juggernaut1974juggernaut1974 Posts: 6,212Member Member Posts: 6,212Member Member
    I don't know that I'd call it "new" (appears to have been published in 2009 if I'm reading correctly?)

    But I can't say as I've seen this one before...so it is new to me.

    Without reading the full study - I wonder, how do they go about measuring arterial stiffness?
    edited March 2016
  • ndj1979ndj1979 Posts: 29,021Member Member Posts: 29,021Member Member
    I don't know that I'd call it "new" (appears to have been published in 2009 if I'm reading correctly?)

    But I can't say as I've seen this one before...so it is new to me.

    Without reading the full study - I wonder, how do they go about measuring arterial stiffness?

    New In the past seven years...
    edited March 2016
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    "Research Design and Methods: We investigated a low-fat (20% fat, 60% carbohydrate) versus a low-carbohydrate (60% fat, 20% carbohydrate) weight reduction diet " so not quite what most would call LCHF.
    The change in overall systemic arterial stiffness, was, however,
    significantly different between diets (P=0.04); this reflected a significant decrease in
    augmentation index following the low-fat diet, compared to a non-significant increase within the
    low-carbohydrate group
    .

    OK, so nothing deteriorated in the lower carb group but the high carb group saw a change in this parameter.

    The triglycerides dropped markedly on low carb
    Triglycerides (mmol/l) 1.59 ± 0.55 0.91 ± 0.33 <0.01

    as these are generally associated with heart disease this looks like a benefit.

    @psulemon should enjoy the funding :smile:
    This study was supported by RRG
    5.42 (PI SJH) from the Northern Ireland
    Department of Health and Social Services
    Research and Development Office and by an
    unrestricted research grant from The Sugar
    Bureau (UK)
    .
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,116Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,116Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    yarwell wrote: »
    "Research Design and Methods: We investigated a low-fat (20% fat, 60% carbohydrate) versus a low-carbohydrate (60% fat, 20% carbohydrate) weight reduction diet " so not quite what most would call LCHF.
    The change in overall systemic arterial stiffness, was, however,
    significantly different between diets (P=0.04); this reflected a significant decrease in
    augmentation index following the low-fat diet, compared to a non-significant increase within the
    low-carbohydrate group
    .

    OK, so nothing deteriorated in the lower carb group but the high carb group saw a change in this parameter.

    The triglycerides dropped markedly on low carb
    Triglycerides (mmol/l) 1.59 ± 0.55 0.91 ± 0.33 <0.01

    as these are generally associated with heart disease this looks like a benefit.

    @psulemon should enjoy the funding :smile:
    This study was supported by RRG
    5.42 (PI SJH) from the Northern Ireland
    Department of Health and Social Services
    Research and Development Office and by an
    unrestricted research grant from The Sugar
    Bureau (UK)
    .

    haha, nice.

    Tagging to read later.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    The study mentions " Furthermore the type of fat in a low-carbohydrate diet i.e. saturated/trans fat versus mono/polyunsaturated fat may be important". I have to wonder if the LCHF group had more unsaturated fat and less saturated fat whether the outcome would have been different.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    The study mentions " Furthermore the type of fat in a low-carbohydrate diet i.e. saturated/trans fat versus mono/polyunsaturated fat may be important". I have to wonder if the LCHF group had more unsaturated fat and less saturated fat whether the outcome would have been different.

    @yarwell had a study that showed that at one point. Funny as it was just mentioned about funding source. The one he's referenced before was done by the Atkins instituted. It featured maintenance calorie diets were LCHF showed improvements in triglycerides I believe, but I think not LDL, and an increased HDL, if I remember the studys' results. The buried lead is that the diet was rather high in mono and poly unsaturated fats compared to the control diet. Still, it would tend to indicate a LCHF emphasizing the unsaturated fats will improve lipid profile.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,116Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,116Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    senecarr wrote: »
    The study mentions " Furthermore the type of fat in a low-carbohydrate diet i.e. saturated/trans fat versus mono/polyunsaturated fat may be important". I have to wonder if the LCHF group had more unsaturated fat and less saturated fat whether the outcome would have been different.

    @yarwell had a study that showed that at one point. Funny as it was just mentioned about funding source. The one he's referenced before was done by the Atkins instituted. It featured maintenance calorie diets were LCHF showed improvements in triglycerides I believe, but I think not LDL, and an increased HDL, if I remember the studys' results. The buried lead is that the diet was rather high in mono and poly unsaturated fats compared to the control diet. Still, it would tend to indicate a LCHF emphasizing the unsaturated fats will improve lipid profile.

    I believe you are correct.

    IRT the bold, I think that is one of the main reasons why the Mediterranean diet is ranked as one of the healthiest diets.
  • Yi5hedr3Yi5hedr3 Posts: 2,704Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,704Member, Premium Member
    Hmmmmm.... all blood markers improve on low carb, high fat diet, yet deteriorate on high carb, low fat diets....yet we are to believe this "study"??? I think not. ;)
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    The study mentions " Furthermore the type of fat in a low-carbohydrate diet i.e. saturated/trans fat versus mono/polyunsaturated fat may be important". I have to wonder if the LCHF group had more unsaturated fat and less saturated fat whether the outcome would have been different.

    @yarwell had a study that showed that at one point. Funny as it was just mentioned about funding source. The one he's referenced before was done by the Atkins instituted. It featured maintenance calorie diets were LCHF showed improvements in triglycerides I believe, but I think not LDL, and an increased HDL, if I remember the studys' results. The buried lead is that the diet was rather high in mono and poly unsaturated fats compared to the control diet. Still, it would tend to indicate a LCHF emphasizing the unsaturated fats will improve lipid profile.

    So we have two studies with polar opposite "unrestricted" funding sources both finding reduced triglycerides on an LCHF diet. Sounds like a conclusion.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    yarwell wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    The study mentions " Furthermore the type of fat in a low-carbohydrate diet i.e. saturated/trans fat versus mono/polyunsaturated fat may be important". I have to wonder if the LCHF group had more unsaturated fat and less saturated fat whether the outcome would have been different.

    @yarwell had a study that showed that at one point. Funny as it was just mentioned about funding source. The one he's referenced before was done by the Atkins instituted. It featured maintenance calorie diets were LCHF showed improvements in triglycerides I believe, but I think not LDL, and an increased HDL, if I remember the studys' results. The buried lead is that the diet was rather high in mono and poly unsaturated fats compared to the control diet. Still, it would tend to indicate a LCHF emphasizing the unsaturated fats will improve lipid profile.

    So we have two studies with polar opposite "unrestricted" funding sources both finding reduced triglycerides on an LCHF diet. Sounds like a conclusion.

    The replacing saturated fats in the diet with other sources of calories tends to improve lipid profiles? Particularly replacement with poly and mono unsaturated? I'd support that conclusion.
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    LOL. You say that triglycerides are unrelated to carbohydrate intake ? Evidence ?

    "carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia" http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11584104

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/12/2/94.abstract (diabetics) 40% vs 60% carbs crossover same sat/polyunsat ratio triglycerides +30% on higher carb.

    Maybe there's a threshold where this starts, be good to know for health.
    edited March 2016
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    yarwell wrote: »
    LOL. You say that triglycerides are unrelated to carbohydrate intake ? Evidence ?

    "carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia" http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11584104

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/12/2/94.abstract (diabetics) 40% vs 60% carbs crossover same sat/polyunsat ratio triglycerides +30% on higher carb.

    Maybe there's a threshold where this starts, be good to know for health.

    Wasn't my claim, nor anyone else's that I see. I just wasn't extrapolating it from the studies mentioned. I'd say that replacing non-fiber carbs with mono and poly unsaturated fats has a similar lipid improvement effect. Though I'd expect the lipid effect to be more exercise / activity level dependent an effect for carbohydrates than for saturated fats.
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    Here's another with 11/12 men on a 2-week Atkins induction program reducing a measure of CVD risk. One guy went the other way but details not presented.

    "After 14 days, BMI and triglycerides decreased significantly, while HDL-C increased."
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    yarwell wrote: »
    Here's another with 11/12 men on a 2-week Atkins induction program reducing a measure of CVD risk. One guy went the other way but details not presented.

    "After 14 days, BMI and triglycerides decreased significantly, while HDL-C increased."

    Yeah, BMI and triglcyerides improved. I'm actually surprised the 12th guy had issues if his BMI dropped too.
  • Sabine_StroehmSabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,389Member Member Posts: 19,389Member Member
    Tagging to read later.
  • soulofgracesoulofgrace Posts: 175Member Member Posts: 175Member Member
    shell1005 wrote: »
    14 Days? They should have renamed the study "The effects of 12 adults when they lose a bunch of water weight and a significant less amount of fat."

    Haha! "BMI improved" over 14 days. Right. 12 men; 14 days. Absolutely groundbreaking research.
  • aub6689aub6689 Posts: 354Member, Premium Member Posts: 354Member, Premium Member
    I think it is interesting that they noticed a difference in arterial stiffness in 14 days, but sample size is too small, and arterial stiffness following a short diet intervention period isn't exactly something you can extrapolate to equate to CVD risk. Also, one study's findings do not mean a thing until they are replicated.
    Always be cautious on studies of diet and especially on the media's overstating of the results. Diet is very hard to accurately measure because people misreport it (among other problems).
  • ndj1979ndj1979 Posts: 29,021Member Member Posts: 29,021Member Member
    aub6689 wrote: »
    I think it is interesting that they noticed a difference in arterial stiffness in 14 days, but sample size is too small, and arterial stiffness following a short diet intervention period isn't exactly something you can extrapolate to equate to CVD risk. Also, one study's findings do not mean a thing until they are replicated.
    Always be cautious on studies of diet and especially on the media's overstating of the results. Diet is very hard to accurately measure because people misreport it (among other problems).

    that is why I threw out for discussion ...
  • mindyhopemindyhope Posts: 4Member Member Posts: 4Member Member
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    I found this article interesting and it links to the study referenced. Here is a snippet:

    The research study, conducted among a group of obese pre-diabetic adults, compared the results of following a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet (20% fat, 60% carbohydrate) with a high-fat low-carbohydrate diet (60% fat, 20% carbohydrate). It showed that in all areas, other than the risk of cardiovascular disease, the diets have equal health benefits. The same amount of weight is lost; there is no significant difference in the body’s glucose uptake or production; and meal tolerance-related insulin secretion is comparable. However, the study revealed a significant difference in overall systemic arterial stiffness and pointed to increased cardiovascular risk factors from high-fat low-carbohydrate diets.

    Interesting, as our LCHF friends like to tell us that there is absolutely no reason to worry about exceeding your fat minimum by 50% of the RDA; however, don't eat carbs because those are bad and will lead to weight gain.

    Link to full article:
    http://www.sugarnutrition.org.uk/news/new-research-high-fat-low-carb-diets-could-mean-significant-heart-risk/
    Link to Study (at bottom of article)
    http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2009/08/23/db09-0098.abstract

    discuss…..
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    I found this article interesting and it links to the study referenced. Here is a snippet:

    The research study, conducted among a group of obese pre-diabetic adults, compared the results of following a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet (20% fat, 60% carbohydrate) with a high-fat low-carbohydrate diet (60% fat, 20% carbohydrate). It showed that in all areas, other than the risk of cardiovascular disease, the diets have equal health benefits. The same amount of weight is lost; there is no significant difference in the body’s glucose uptake or production; and meal tolerance-related insulin secretion is comparable. However, the study revealed a significant difference in overall systemic arterial stiffness and pointed to increased cardiovascular risk factors from high-fat low-carbohydrate diets.

    Interesting, as our LCHF friends like to tell us that there is absolutely no reason to worry about exceeding your fat minimum by 50% of the RDA; however, don't eat carbs because those are bad and will lead to weight gain.

    Link to full article:
    http://www.sugarnutrition.org.uk/news/new-research-high-fat-low-carb-diets-could-mean-significant-heart-risk/
    Link to Study (at bottom of article)
    http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2009/08/23/db09-0098.abstract

    discuss…..

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