Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

research: high-fat low-carb diets could mean significant heart risk

2

Replies

  • mindyhopemindyhope Posts: 4Member Member Posts: 4Member Member
    I am less hungry when I'm on more fats lower carbs than vice versa.
  • ndj1979ndj1979 Posts: 29,021Member Member Posts: 29,021Member Member
    mindyhope wrote: »
    I am less hungry when I'm on more fats lower carbs than vice versa.

    ok, but that is not what this thread is about...
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    mindyhope wrote: »
    I am less hungry when I'm on more fats lower carbs than vice versa.

    Do you think it is because your arteries stiffen and keep your stomach in place? :)
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    shell1005 wrote: »
    14 Days? They should have renamed the study "The effects of 12 adults when they lose a bunch of water weight and a significant less amount of fat."

    the discussion is about the triglycerides or heart risk, please don't divert.

    What is the effect of water weight on triglycerides, or is that not in the playbook.
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    LOL at all the denial.

    So, half of a group of obese diabetics were put on a carb restricted diet and the other half on calorie restriction. After the initial study period many of the controls switched over to the carb restricted diet. Of the five controls that did not switch four suffered at least one heart event in the 4 yr follow up and two died. 80% prevalence of heart disease.

    In the carb restricted originals and convertors two patients had heart related events.
    Cardiovascular disease
    We have examined medical charts for episodes of cardiovascular disease beginning 3 months after the initiation of the diet therapy.

    Among the 16 patients in the low-carbohydrate diet group (41 months observations time) and among the 7 controls that changed from the high-carbohydrate diet to the opposite (33 months observations time) – totalling 23 patients – 2 patients have suffered cardiovascular disease, stroke and heart failure respectively (8.5%. 95% confidence interval (CI 95%): 1.0–28.0). One patient without known cardiac disease has died suddenly. Autopsy showed no sign of coronary thrombosis, myocardial infarction or stroke. The cause of death unknown but assumed to be general atherosclerosis.

    As for the 3 controls who switched diet at later dates, there has been no occurrence of cardiovascular disease.

    Four patients (80%. CI 95%: 28.3–99.5) among the 5 controls that never attempted any change of diet have suffered several heart infarctions followed by heart failure. Two of them have died from their heart disease (p = 0.025. Fischer Exact).

    http://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-7075-5-14

    So this carb restricted diet study clearly found no issues with heart risk over an extended follow-up, unlike the control diet with its body count.
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    Another carbohydrate restriction study in diabetics, with a control, not aiming for weight loss (though some happened in both groups). http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/53/9/2375.full

    A is the control diet, B is the 20% carb low GL intervention, before and after 5 weeks. The fasting Triglycerides were 40% lower on the low carb arm :

    F6.medium.gif
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    Copy of an old discussion from when the OP study was published is at http://www.michaelmooney.net/SugarIndustryAttacksLowCarbs.html
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    aub6689 wrote: »
    I think it is interesting that they noticed a difference in arterial stiffness in 14 days, but sample size is too small, and arterial stiffness following a short diet intervention period isn't exactly something you can extrapolate to equate to CVD risk. Also, one study's findings do not mean a thing until they are replicated.
    Always be cautious on studies of diet and especially on the media's overstating of the results. Diet is very hard to accurately measure because people misreport it (among other problems).

    One could have one's own arterial stiffness measured at the start of, and then a few weeks into, a dietary change. It can be done non-invasively. That's a lot sooner than you can measure triglycerides and cholesterol, and while there is a fair amount of disagreement over optimal cholesterol levels, I haven't heard of anyone saying that increased arterial stiffness is good.
    edited March 2016
  • RebeccaNaegleRebeccaNaegle Posts: 236Member, Premium Member Posts: 236Member, Premium Member
    I cant see any reasoning behind a high fat low carb diet unless directed by your doctor. I personally love my carbs!
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    I cant see any reasoning behind a high fat low carb diet unless directed by your doctor. I personally love my carbs!

    For exactly the same reason that you love carbs, some people personally love their cream, well-marbled steaks, avocados, and nuts.
  • RebeccaNaegleRebeccaNaegle Posts: 236Member, Premium Member Posts: 236Member, Premium Member
    I eat fat and carbs. Your body is made to use carbs as energy, therefore you should be eating a reasonable amount of both to keep everything running as it should.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,093Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,093Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    I eat fat and carbs. Your body is made to use carbs as energy, therefore you should be eating a reasonable amount of both to keep everything running as it should.

    Your body has the ability to adapt. It also uses both fat and carbs as a source of energy depending on the activity (fat oxidation vs carb oxidation).
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    I eat fat and carbs. Your body is made to use carbs as energy, therefore you should be eating a reasonable amount of both to keep everything running as it should.

    Your body is able to use fat, protein, and carbs for energy. Yay body - thanks for the versatility.
    edited March 2016
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,093Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,093Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    @Yarwell would you agree that the type of fat matters, just like the type of carb matters in terms of improvements to cholesterol? Even in KH calorie study, total cholesterol improved in both groups.
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    @Yarwell would you agree that the type of fat matters, just like the type of carb matters in terms of improvements to cholesterol? Even in KH calorie study, total cholesterol improved in both groups.

    As a general point I would agree that the health effects of any fat depends what you replace it with to determine the alternative position.

    Total Cholesterol improved in 6 days ? .... so it did, except in the RC women.
  • lisawinning4losinglisawinning4losing Posts: 732Member Member Posts: 732Member Member
    Too much or too little of anything could be bad, which brings us back to the good old fashioned concept of a well balanced diet, though what the proper balance is will still be debated. For me, low carb means less junk food, so I only see that as a good thing. If you're going low carb then you definitely won't be stuffing your mouth with potato chips and sugary snacks, or packaged foods with lots of added sugars. Junk food also tends to contain a lot of things like corn and flour. Ya know, like Triskets and Cheetos and stuff. You won't be eating fast food either (unless it's a lettuce wrap).

    I've noticed that a healthy diet, or what you might call a whole foods diet, even one that contains fruit, is naturally much lower in carbs than one with a lot of junk food, which is usually full of carbs. One naturally follows the other. As another example, if I'm counting carbs, then I'm encouraged to cook for myself rather than eat a frozen dinner which is no doubt full of added sugar.

    I don't feel like I have to be super restrictive on carbs. But, if you cut junk food out of your diet, then you'll automatically see your carb levels drop dramatically. By the same token, if you restrict carbs, then you'll automatically see your junk food consumption drop dramatically.
    edited March 2016
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,093Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,093Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    Too much or too little of anything could be bad, which brings us back to the good old fashioned concept of a well balanced diet, though what the proper balance is will still be debated. For me, low carb means less junk food, so I only see that as a good thing. If you're going low carb then you definitely won't be stuffing your mouth with potato chips and sugary snacks, or packaged foods with lots of added sugars. You won't be eating fast food either (unless it's a lettuce wrap).

    I've noticed that a healthy diet, or what you might call a whole foods diet, even one that contains fruit, is naturally much lower in carbs than one with a lot of junk food, which is usually full of carbs. One naturally follows the other. As another example, if I'm counting carbs, then I'm encouraged to cook for myself rather than eat a frozen dinner which is no doubt full of added sugar. I don't feel like I have to be super restrictive on carbs. But, if you cut junk food out of your diet, then you'll automatically see your carb levels dramatically.

    Low carb doesn't necessarily mean less junk and high carb doesn't mean lots of junk. There are many high carb diets that are nothing buy whole and nutritious foods and there are plenty of low carb diets high in saturated fats. In all reality, it's how its implement.
    edited March 2016
  • rnelson88rnelson88 Posts: 122Member Member Posts: 122Member Member
    50% Protein/40% Fat/10% Carbs ....works magic!
  • lisawinning4losinglisawinning4losing Posts: 732Member Member Posts: 732Member Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Too much or too little of anything could be bad, which brings us back to the good old fashioned concept of a well balanced diet, though what the proper balance is will still be debated. For me, low carb means less junk food, so I only see that as a good thing. If you're going low carb then you definitely won't be stuffing your mouth with potato chips and sugary snacks, or packaged foods with lots of added sugars. You won't be eating fast food either (unless it's a lettuce wrap).

    I've noticed that a healthy diet, or what you might call a whole foods diet, even one that contains fruit, is naturally much lower in carbs than one with a lot of junk food, which is usually full of carbs. One naturally follows the other. As another example, if I'm counting carbs, then I'm encouraged to cook for myself rather than eat a frozen dinner which is no doubt full of added sugar. I don't feel like I have to be super restrictive on carbs. But, if you cut junk food out of your diet, then you'll automatically see your carb levels dramatically.

    Low carb doesn't necessarily mean less junk and high carb doesn't mean lots of junk. There are many high carb diets that are nothing buy whole and nutritious foods and there are plenty of low carb diets high in saturated fats. In all reality, it's how its implement.

    Well, I guess that's fair enough. There are some people, like Freelee the banana girl, who eat almost nothing but fruit. It's a whole foods diet, but no doubt high in carbs. Though at least it's better than refined carbs. And some people who are low carb will eat a lot of processed meat like hot dogs and sausages that are full of nitrites and other nasty things. So, it really does depend on how it's implemented. That's why I said that's what it means to me . When I think low carb, I don't think "Oooh, hot dogs!" But I guess some people do. (Though I'm guessing that hot dogs also have added sugars, if only in small amounts, because practically everything processed like that does. So if you're trying to avoid any amount of processed sugar, then that would also eliminate that, I would think.)
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Too much or too little of anything could be bad, which brings us back to the good old fashioned concept of a well balanced diet, though what the proper balance is will still be debated. For me, low carb means less junk food, so I only see that as a good thing. If you're going low carb then you definitely won't be stuffing your mouth with potato chips and sugary snacks, or packaged foods with lots of added sugars. You won't be eating fast food either (unless it's a lettuce wrap).

    I've noticed that a healthy diet, or what you might call a whole foods diet, even one that contains fruit, is naturally much lower in carbs than one with a lot of junk food, which is usually full of carbs. One naturally follows the other. As another example, if I'm counting carbs, then I'm encouraged to cook for myself rather than eat a frozen dinner which is no doubt full of added sugar. I don't feel like I have to be super restrictive on carbs. But, if you cut junk food out of your diet, then you'll automatically see your carb levels dramatically.

    Low carb doesn't necessarily mean less junk and high carb doesn't mean lots of junk. There are many high carb diets that are nothing buy whole and nutritious foods and there are plenty of low carb diets high in saturated fats. In all reality, it's how its implement.

    Well, I guess that's fair enough. There are some people, like Freelee the banana girl, who eat almost nothing but fruit. It's a whole foods diet, but no doubt high in carbs. Though at least it's better than refined carbs. And some people who are low carb will eat a lot of processed meat like hot dogs and sausages that are full of nitrites and other nasty things. So, it really does depend on how it's implemented. That's why I said that's what it means to me . When I think low carb, I don't think "Oooh, hot dogs!" But I guess some people do. (Though I'm guessing that hot dogs also have added sugars, if only in small amounts, because practically everything processed like that does. So if you're trying to avoid any amount of processed sugar, then that would also eliminate that, I would think.)

    I hope you're aware that Freelee's diet is pretty bad. She has amenorrhea and she thinks that is a sign that she is keeping her body so clean that it doesn't need a monthly toxin release.
Sign In or Register to comment.