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Eating before going to sleep

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  • eric_sg61eric_sg61 Posts: 2,931Member Member Posts: 2,931Member Member
    Numerio wrote: »
    It really depends
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    thorsmom01 wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    meal timing makes no difference, what matters is that you are in a consistent calorie deficit.

    This

    I'm sorry, but you're only half right! A calorie deficit IS important for losing weight, but in order to prevent feelings of resentment and self-loathing, you need to eat the right foods to keep you full, or not craving food.

    I know this is all confusing, so I've created a simple formula:

    Focus on protein for all your meals, start the day with lower carbs, and increase your carbs with each meal.

    Why exactly?

    Protein keeps you fuller longer, and crushes cravings! If you start the day with high amounts of carbs, you send your blood sugar spiking, increase cortisol levels AKA your stress hormone, which sends signals to the brain that it's time to store fat (primal survival instinct)!

    Higher amounts of carbs later in the day, however, increases the production of melatonin, which helps our bodies sleep better!

    Admittedly, I'm still ironing out the little details, but I've followed this formula daily since last February, and have lost more than 60 pounds, and now my body feels the best it ever has!

    Citation? And not some blog Only Pubmed, ResearchGate etc.
  • NumerioNumerio Posts: 29Member Member Posts: 29Member Member
    If it is a citation, I'm unaware of the source.
  • NumerioNumerio Posts: 29Member Member Posts: 29Member Member
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Maybe for you but not for everyone. I eat carbs at every meal and eat after 7pm and now am in maintenance. Meal timing is a irrelevant and macros are a personal choice.

    In my experience, you're right, but the trouble comes if you consistently outnumber grams, ounces, etc of protein with carbs!
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    monikker wrote: »
    Why would you increase carbs with each meal? From what I understand if you're going to consider amount of carbs you'd want to start with most at the start of the day for energy purposes...and decrease as the day goes on. I'm eating low carb so either way I'm not eating many carbs.
    I guess it varies from person to person, but for me I find that prioritizing protein more at breakfast helps me from an energy standpoint. Eating a lot of carbs and and not much fat or protein seems to be worse for me.
  • queenliz99queenliz99 Posts: 15,358Member Member Posts: 15,358Member Member
    Numerio wrote: »
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Maybe for you but not for everyone. I eat carbs at every meal and eat after 7pm and now am in maintenance. Meal timing is a irrelevant and macros are a personal choice.

    In my experience, you're right, but the trouble comes if you consistently outnumber grams, ounces, etc of protein with carbs!

    But that is the point, your way of eating is just that your way of eating. Blanket statements advising someone not to eat after 7 is silly. What if the poster gets home after 7, sorry you can't eat it's too late.
  • Mouse_PotatoMouse_Potato Posts: 1,207Member Member Posts: 1,207Member Member
    It's 8:30 here and I'm just sitting down to dinner. I must admit I *do* feel resentful, but my loathing is directed more at the PM who made me work so late.

    It doesn't seem to have any effect on my weight loss, though. In fact, I eat all the way up until bedtime. I guess the carbs in my nightly glass of wine cancel out the fat from the pistachios. ;)
  • NumerioNumerio Posts: 29Member Member Posts: 29Member Member
    Hey
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Maybe for you but not for everyone. I eat carbs at every meal and eat after 7pm and now am in maintenance. Meal timing is a irrelevant and macros are a personal choice.

    In my experience, you're right, but the trouble comes if you consistently outnumber grams, ounces, etc of protein with carbs!

    But that is the point, your way of eating is just that your way of eating. Blanket statements advising someone not to eat after 7 is silly. What if the poster gets home after 7, sorry you can't eat it's too late.

    Hey, I eat after 7 too! Doesn't matter how late you eat, just have carbs later, so it helps you sleep! More than anything, get a good night's sleep!
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    Numerio wrote: »
    Hey
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Maybe for you but not for everyone. I eat carbs at every meal and eat after 7pm and now am in maintenance. Meal timing is a irrelevant and macros are a personal choice.

    In my experience, you're right, but the trouble comes if you consistently outnumber grams, ounces, etc of protein with carbs!

    But that is the point, your way of eating is just that your way of eating. Blanket statements advising someone not to eat after 7 is silly. What if the poster gets home after 7, sorry you can't eat it's too late.

    Hey, I eat after 7 too! Doesn't matter how late you eat, just have carbs later, so it helps you sleep! More than anything, get a good night's sleep!
    From personal experience this doesn't work for me, although I have suspicions why this is the case. IMO there are other things that individuals looking to improve sleep should look at first, such as keeping stress from all causes (emotional and digestive in particular) low.
  • NumerioNumerio Posts: 29Member Member Posts: 29Member Member
    I think you
    Numerio wrote: »
    Hey
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Maybe for you but not for everyone. I eat carbs at every meal and eat after 7pm and now am in maintenance. Meal timing is a irrelevant and macros are a personal choice.

    In my experience, you're right, but the trouble comes if you consistently outnumber grams, ounces, etc of protein with carbs!

    But that is the point, your way of eating is just that your way of eating. Blanket statements advising someone not to eat after 7 is silly. What if the poster gets home after 7, sorry you can't eat it's too late.

    Hey, I eat after 7 too! Doesn't matter how late you eat, just have carbs later, so it helps you sleep! More than anything, get a good night's sleep!
    From personal experience this doesn't work for me, although I have suspicions why this is the case. IMO there are other things that individuals looking to improve sleep should look at first, such as keeping stress from all causes (emotional and digestive in particular) low.

    I think you misunderstand me, I'm not saying high-carbs like white pasta, I'm talking low carbs, like vegetables!
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    Numerio wrote: »
    It really depends
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    thorsmom01 wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    meal timing makes no difference, what matters is that you are in a consistent calorie deficit.

    This

    I'm sorry, but you're only half right! A calorie deficit IS important for losing weight, but in order to prevent feelings of resentment and self-loathing, you need to eat the right foods to keep you full, or not craving food.

    I know this is all confusing, so I've created a simple formula:

    Focus on protein for all your meals, start the day with lower carbs, and increase your carbs with each meal.

    Why exactly?

    Protein keeps you fuller longer, and crushes cravings! If you start the day with high amounts of carbs, you send your blood sugar spiking, increase cortisol levels AKA your stress hormone, which sends signals to the brain that it's time to store fat (primal survival instinct)!

    Higher amounts of carbs later in the day, however, increases the production of melatonin, which helps our bodies sleep better!

    Admittedly, I'm still ironing out the little details, but I've followed this formula daily since last February, and have lost more than 60 pounds, and now my body feels the best it ever has!

    Food / eating typically lowers cortisol. Cortisol often rises in the morning as part of causing wakefulness.
    Your advice actually sounds backwards.

    In for claims about:
    timthumb.php?src=http%3A%2F%2Fbrainimmune.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2015%2F12%2Fsapolsky-zebras-glucocorticoids-stress.jpg&q=90&w=630&zc=1
    edited March 2016
  • AnvilHeadAnvilHead Posts: 18,543Member Member Posts: 18,543Member Member
    Numerio wrote: »
    thorsmom01 wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    meal timing makes no difference, what matters is that you are in a consistent calorie deficit.

    This

    I'm sorry, but you're only half right! A calorie deficit IS important for losing weight, but in order to prevent feelings of resentment and self-loathing, you need to eat the right foods to keep you full, or not craving food...

    Say what???

    Numerio wrote: »
    I know this is all confusing, so I've created a simple formula:

    Focus on protein for all your meals, start the day with lower carbs, and increase your carbs with each meal.

    Any scientific research to back up your "formula", or is this all just n=1? I haven't seen you tie this together into anything which makes sense or has anything whatsoever to do with the original topic.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    Did you know that in many European countries a 7pm dinner is considered early?

    I approve of this.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    Numerio wrote: »
    thorsmom01 wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    meal timing makes no difference, what matters is that you are in a consistent calorie deficit.

    This

    I'm sorry, but you're only half right! A calorie deficit IS important for losing weight, but in order to prevent feelings of resentment and self-loathing, you need to eat the right foods to keep you full, or not craving food.

    Um, it really shouldn't be that complicated to figure out how to eat to not be hungry and to be satisfied.

    I sometimes eat lots of carbs at night and sometimes eat only protein and veg, doesn't matter. My overall diet and habits mean I am not hungry or craving food.
  • robertw486robertw486 Posts: 1,993Member, Greeter, Premium Member Posts: 1,993Member, Greeter, Premium Member
    My mom always fusses with me saying that i shouldnt eat after like 7 because it will make me gain weight. What's your view on this and why?

    She is just wrong. Multiple scientific studies show that meal timing has little if anything to do with gaining or losing weight. Calorie intake vs energy use (calories out) is what controls weight.

    I've eating at all kinds of strange hours since I've been an adult, and it hasn't caused any weight control issues.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    It really depends
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    thorsmom01 wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    meal timing makes no difference, what matters is that you are in a consistent calorie deficit.

    This

    I'm sorry, but you're only half right! A calorie deficit IS important for losing weight, but in order to prevent feelings of resentment and self-loathing, you need to eat the right foods to keep you full, or not craving food.

    I know this is all confusing, so I've created a simple formula:

    Focus on protein for all your meals, start the day with lower carbs, and increase your carbs with each meal.

    Why exactly?

    Protein keeps you fuller longer, and crushes cravings! If you start the day with high amounts of carbs, you send your blood sugar spiking, increase cortisol levels AKA your stress hormone, which sends signals to the brain that it's time to store fat (primal survival instinct)!

    Higher amounts of carbs later in the day, however, increases the production of melatonin, which helps our bodies sleep better!

    Admittedly, I'm still ironing out the little details, but I've followed this formula daily since last February, and have lost more than 60 pounds, and now my body feels the best it ever has!

    Food / eating typically lowers cortisol. Cortisol often rises in the morning as part of causing wakefulness.
    Your advice actually sounds backwards.
    Wouldn't that be dependent on the macro nutrient distribution of the meal (high carbs and low fat/protein vs a more balanced meal)? I thought his statement about that in particular is true because excessive blood sugar spikes do increase cortisol. And since a lot of people in general following the typical SAD start their day off with foods like waffles, doughnuts, pastries, cereal (coupled with a sugary drink from, say Starbucks), I thought that made sense.
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Posts: 9,706Member Member Posts: 9,706Member Member
    it's untrue and I blame oprah for starting this popular myth. I remember watching shows where she was a proponent of this idea. and where oprah goes, so do her followers
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    It really depends
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    thorsmom01 wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    meal timing makes no difference, what matters is that you are in a consistent calorie deficit.

    This

    I'm sorry, but you're only half right! A calorie deficit IS important for losing weight, but in order to prevent feelings of resentment and self-loathing, you need to eat the right foods to keep you full, or not craving food.

    I know this is all confusing, so I've created a simple formula:

    Focus on protein for all your meals, start the day with lower carbs, and increase your carbs with each meal.

    Why exactly?

    Protein keeps you fuller longer, and crushes cravings! If you start the day with high amounts of carbs, you send your blood sugar spiking, increase cortisol levels AKA your stress hormone, which sends signals to the brain that it's time to store fat (primal survival instinct)!

    Higher amounts of carbs later in the day, however, increases the production of melatonin, which helps our bodies sleep better!

    Admittedly, I'm still ironing out the little details, but I've followed this formula daily since last February, and have lost more than 60 pounds, and now my body feels the best it ever has!

    Food / eating typically lowers cortisol. Cortisol often rises in the morning as part of causing wakefulness.
    Your advice actually sounds backwards.
    Wouldn't that be dependent on the macro nutrient distribution of the meal (high carbs and low fat/protein vs a more balanced meal)? I thought his statement about that in particular is true because excessive blood sugar spikes do increase cortisol. And since a lot of people in general following the typical SAD start their day off with foods like waffles, doughnuts, pastries, cereal (coupled with a sugary drink from, say Starbucks), I thought that made sense.

    The macronutrition distribution probably plays a part in lowering cortisol. My recollection is that carbs do it more than others, and that a problem for long term ketogenic diets may be high cortisol levels - I recall being blamed by some for causing sleep issues for people. Still, my recollection is that all foods should lower it some extent.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    It really depends
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Numerio wrote: »
    thorsmom01 wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    meal timing makes no difference, what matters is that you are in a consistent calorie deficit.

    This

    I'm sorry, but you're only half right! A calorie deficit IS important for losing weight, but in order to prevent feelings of resentment and self-loathing, you need to eat the right foods to keep you full, or not craving food.

    I know this is all confusing, so I've created a simple formula:

    Focus on protein for all your meals, start the day with lower carbs, and increase your carbs with each meal.

    Why exactly?

    Protein keeps you fuller longer, and crushes cravings! If you start the day with high amounts of carbs, you send your blood sugar spiking, increase cortisol levels AKA your stress hormone, which sends signals to the brain that it's time to store fat (primal survival instinct)!

    Higher amounts of carbs later in the day, however, increases the production of melatonin, which helps our bodies sleep better!

    Admittedly, I'm still ironing out the little details, but I've followed this formula daily since last February, and have lost more than 60 pounds, and now my body feels the best it ever has!

    Food / eating typically lowers cortisol. Cortisol often rises in the morning as part of causing wakefulness.
    Your advice actually sounds backwards.
    Wouldn't that be dependent on the macro nutrient distribution of the meal (high carbs and low fat/protein vs a more balanced meal)? I thought his statement about that in particular is true because excessive blood sugar spikes do increase cortisol. And since a lot of people in general following the typical SAD start their day off with foods like waffles, doughnuts, pastries, cereal (coupled with a sugary drink from, say Starbucks), I thought that made sense.

    The macronutrition distribution probably plays a part in lowering cortisol. My recollection is that carbs do it more than others, and that a problem for long term ketogenic diets may be high cortisol levels - I recall being blamed by some for causing sleep issues for people. Still, my recollection is that all foods should lower it some extent.

    Yes, I've read that about keto diets as well.
  • elivelez62elivelez62 Posts: 19Member Member Posts: 19Member Member
    It is suggested that you do not eat 3 hours before bedtime. There is no study linking eating before bedtime and gain weight on humans, only on mice.
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