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How much will one pay/risk for weight loss?

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  • ninerbuffninerbuff Posts: 42,520Member, Greeter Member Posts: 42,520Member, Greeter Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    People understand the risks behind your examples. They don't understand the risks behind rapid weight loss. The diet industry is largely at fault there, but lack of education on basic health science adds to the problem.
    Which is sad because health should be a priority to teach, especially now with so many people being overweight/obese even amongst children.
    I think I only had 1 overweight teacher growing up. The rest seemed "normal" even though I had no idea if they dieted or exercised.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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    I just can't buy into the lack of education as a reason for overweight or obesity. Ask a 3rd grader why someone is fat and they will say that person eats too much.
    Ask that same 3rd grader how much someone should eat though and what do you think the answer would be? And what kind of food is better nutritional wise? I believe education does make a difference.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • ninerbuffninerbuff Posts: 42,520Member, Greeter Member Posts: 42,520Member, Greeter Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    I think part of the problem, also, is that your list contains obvious risks. I can see the danger in an oncoming car. I can see the sharpness of the knives. I can't intuitively sense the danger in fad diet pills or rapid weight loss.

    Before doing the research a couple of years back, I thought it was perfectly normal and possible to lose 5-10lbs in a week, because of advertising. So, naturally, when I only lost a pound I considered myself a failure and gave up.

    This. There is plenty of psychology of perceived risk. Cows kill far more people per year than sharks, almost no one thinks of cows as scary animals.

    A coal fired power plant emits more radiation than a nuclear power plant, but most people would be more afraid of living next to a nuclear power plant.
    Thank you for teaching me something new. I would have never guessed.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Posts: 42,520Member, Greeter Member Posts: 42,520Member, Greeter Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Yeah, unfortunately I think this is an issue with education and ignorance. By the time people are in their teens, they are seeing articles with tips & secrets to lose weight fast, workouts advertise a "quick-start" add-on that will help you lose 10 lbs & a dress size in a week, the Biggest Loser (nuff said), celebrities who lose baby weight in 6 weeks so they can film a video, etc. I think they get the impression that the only thing keeping them from losing weight fast is their lack of will-power and a team of people to force them to do what needs to be done.

    I wish MFP gave more guidance when you are setting up your account on what a healthy goal is and WHY losing faster could be unhealthy.
    Put it in the suggestion box.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    @ninerbuff hey you have a higher chance of getting killed by a toddler than a terrorist if you are american
  • ClosetBayesianClosetBayesian Posts: 834Member Member Posts: 834Member Member
    Some of the posts in the "Success Stories" forum here may also contribute to the problem; there are several where people detail losing well over 100lbs in a year or less. For someone who's new to this (or even someone who's done this for a while but has hit a plateau), it's hard to not make comparisons to that rate of loss and wonder what it is you're doing wrong.
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Posts: 4,859Member Member Posts: 4,859Member Member
    usmcmp wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    People understand the risks behind your examples. They don't understand the risks behind rapid weight loss. The diet industry is largely at fault there, but lack of education on basic health science adds to the problem.
    Which is sad because health should be a priority to teach, especially now with so many people being overweight/obese even amongst children.
    I think I only had 1 overweight teacher growing up. The rest seemed "normal" even though I had no idea if they dieted or exercised.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    I just can't buy into the lack of education as a reason for overweight or obesity. Ask a 3rd grader why someone is fat and they will say that person eats too much.

    When I suggested lack of education, it wasn't as a reason for obesity, it was as a reason for thinking rapid weight loss is without risk and a typical result of deciding to diet.

    Got it. That's fair. Thanks for the clarification.

    Too many people looking for easy way out.
  • SugarbeatSugarbeat Posts: 825Member Member Posts: 825Member Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    People understand the risks behind your examples. They don't understand the risks behind rapid weight loss. The diet industry is largely at fault there, but lack of education on basic health science adds to the problem.
    Which is sad because health should be a priority to teach, especially now with so many people being overweight/obese even amongst children.
    I think I only had 1 overweight teacher growing up. The rest seemed "normal" even though I had no idea if they dieted or exercised.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    But "health" isn't what is so often promoted, its weight loss. A lot of people equate weight loss with good health. Quicker weight loss means better health faster. I'm not saying I agree with them, but that seems to be the train of thought I hear around me.
  • nvmomketonvmomketo Posts: 12,031Member Member Posts: 12,031Member Member
    I suppose by some people's point of view, I am risking unknown possible side effects of the ketogenic diet to improve my health in the present. It doesn't feel like much of a risk to me though.
  • auddiiauddii Posts: 15,410Member Member Posts: 15,410Member Member
    If it involves eating something (and a lot of it), then I'd willing to risk it. Raw eggs, milk, cheese, lamb, cookie dough, and unwashed produce are very tasty. Except for raw pheasant giblets. Discovered that one by accident... Eugh.

    I ought to invent The Fugu Diet.
    fugu-fish.png
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    People understand the risks behind your examples. They don't understand the risks behind rapid weight loss. The diet industry is largely at fault there, but lack of education on basic health science adds to the problem.
    Which is sad because health should be a priority to teach, especially now with so many people being overweight/obese even amongst children.
    I think I only had 1 overweight teacher growing up. The rest seemed "normal" even though I had no idea if they dieted or exercised.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    I just can't buy into the lack of education as a reason for overweight or obesity. Ask a 3rd grader why someone is fat and they will say that person eats too much.

    True. They do know that much. But do they know which foods are better or worse for you, in any sense? Kids love sweets.

    My family was mildly obese growing up. We ate pre-packaged Betty Crocker food and counted that as home cooking. I thought canned peas and carrots counted as my vegetables for the day. I think when we talk about educating kids on health and fitness, it's not just the principle of "don't eat too much" -- but also teaching them to be active, go outside, find a sport/exercise you're into. As they get older, deepen the education into principles. Kids may or may not listen, but at least they can't claim ignorance.

    Canned carrots don't count? :'(

    Yeah, I got lost on the canned vegetables. They're my least favorite vegetables to eat because I don't like the taste, but if that's what people are limited to due to budgets, they're not unhealthy foods.
  • JeromeBarry1JeromeBarry1 Posts: 10,116Member Member Posts: 10,116Member Member
    Minerbuff, since it's easy to jump to the supposition that you've never actually needed to lose 5 lb, I'll answer your question by saying that I can show you any episode of Biggest Loser and say "That's how to lose 5 lb in a week."
  • auddiiauddii Posts: 15,410Member Member Posts: 15,410Member Member
    Minerbuff, since it's easy to jump to the supposition that you've never actually needed to lose 5 lb, I'll answer your question by saying that I can show you any episode of Biggest Loser and say "That's how to lose 5 lb in a week."

    Actually their "week of weight loss" is more like two weeks thanks to editing (going off of interviews with former contestants). And several outspoken contestants have discussed how unhealthy the program is with trainers and producers of the show telling them to ignore the advice of the doctors paid by the show to care for them during their time there.

    Utterly ridiculous that you would hold this show up as a healthy way to lose weight.
  • moe0303moe0303 Posts: 933Member Member Posts: 933Member Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Minerbuff, since it's easy to jump to the supposition that you've never actually needed to lose 5 lb, I'll answer your question by saying that I can show you any episode of Biggest Loser and say "That's how to lose 5 lb in a week."

    Actually their "week of weight loss" is more like two weeks thanks to editing (going off of interviews with former contestants). And several outspoken contestants have discussed how unhealthy the program is with trainers and producers of the show telling them to ignore the advice of the doctors paid by the show to care for them during their time there.

    Utterly ridiculous that you would hold this show up as a healthy way to lose weight.
    @JeromeBarry1 The parameters in the OP are to lose 5lbs in a week without diet and exercise. I am sure that they do both on that show.

    I think it is entirely possible for one to lose 5 pounds and more in a healthy manner. Each situation is unique.

    edited March 2016
  • moe0303moe0303 Posts: 933Member Member Posts: 933Member Member
    shell1005 wrote: »
    moe0303 wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    Minerbuff, since it's easy to jump to the supposition that you've never actually needed to lose 5 lb, I'll answer your question by saying that I can show you any episode of Biggest Loser and say "That's how to lose 5 lb in a week."

    Actually their "week of weight loss" is more like two weeks thanks to editing (going off of interviews with former contestants). And several outspoken contestants have discussed how unhealthy the program is with trainers and producers of the show telling them to ignore the advice of the doctors paid by the show to care for them during their time there.

    Utterly ridiculous that you would hold this show up as a healthy way to lose weight.
    The parameters in the OP are to lose 5lbs in a week without diet and exercise. I am sure that they do both on that show.

    @JeromeBarry1I think it is entirely possible for one to lose 5 pounds and more in a healthy manner. Each situation is unique.

    It's possible and healthy to lose 5 lbs per week?? That is a weekly caloric deficit of 17,500. I don't think so. If we are talking about the first couple weeks when water weight is coming off then fine, but to be healthy sustainable weekly loss???

    Again, going by the parameters in the OP, 5lbs in a week. It is very possible that a 400 pound 37 year old man eating 1300 calories per day could expect to safely lose 5 pounds in a week. That is considering diet alone. It is possible that he could lose even more if his activity level were increased. Each situation is unique. Is it sustainable? Maybe. There are a lot of factors that come into play as to whether or not it can be done safely.
    edited March 2016
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    Possible for the super morbidly obese and for those who are retaining a lot of fluid.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    moe0303 wrote: »
    shell1005 wrote: »
    moe0303 wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    Minerbuff, since it's easy to jump to the supposition that you've never actually needed to lose 5 lb, I'll answer your question by saying that I can show you any episode of Biggest Loser and say "That's how to lose 5 lb in a week."

    Actually their "week of weight loss" is more like two weeks thanks to editing (going off of interviews with former contestants). And several outspoken contestants have discussed how unhealthy the program is with trainers and producers of the show telling them to ignore the advice of the doctors paid by the show to care for them during their time there.

    Utterly ridiculous that you would hold this show up as a healthy way to lose weight.
    The parameters in the OP are to lose 5lbs in a week without diet and exercise. I am sure that they do both on that show.

    @JeromeBarry1I think it is entirely possible for one to lose 5 pounds and more in a healthy manner. Each situation is unique.

    It's possible and healthy to lose 5 lbs per week?? That is a weekly caloric deficit of 17,500. I don't think so. If we are talking about the first couple weeks when water weight is coming off then fine, but to be healthy sustainable weekly loss???

    Again, going by the parameters in the OP, 5lbs in a week. It is very possible that a 400 pound 37 year old man eating 1300 calories per day could expect to safely lose 5 pounds in a week. That is considering diet alone. It is possible that he could lose even more if his activity level were increased. Each situation is unique. Is it sustainable? Maybe. There are a lot of factors that come into play as to whether or not it can be done safely.

    Not sustainable. On a long enough time line, no weight loss is sustainable. Eventually it will have to be some amount less, and chances are good one will lose lean mass if the deficit is above 31 calories per pound of current body fat per day.

    I get a 400 pounds and eating 1300 calories with a sedentary TDEE is about 4 pounds though.
  • moe0303moe0303 Posts: 933Member Member Posts: 933Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    moe0303 wrote: »
    shell1005 wrote: »
    moe0303 wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    Minerbuff, since it's easy to jump to the supposition that you've never actually needed to lose 5 lb, I'll answer your question by saying that I can show you any episode of Biggest Loser and say "That's how to lose 5 lb in a week."

    Actually their "week of weight loss" is more like two weeks thanks to editing (going off of interviews with former contestants). And several outspoken contestants have discussed how unhealthy the program is with trainers and producers of the show telling them to ignore the advice of the doctors paid by the show to care for them during their time there.

    Utterly ridiculous that you would hold this show up as a healthy way to lose weight.
    The parameters in the OP are to lose 5lbs in a week without diet and exercise. I am sure that they do both on that show.

    @JeromeBarry1I think it is entirely possible for one to lose 5 pounds and more in a healthy manner. Each situation is unique.

    It's possible and healthy to lose 5 lbs per week?? That is a weekly caloric deficit of 17,500. I don't think so. If we are talking about the first couple weeks when water weight is coming off then fine, but to be healthy sustainable weekly loss???

    Again, going by the parameters in the OP, 5lbs in a week. It is very possible that a 400 pound 37 year old man eating 1300 calories per day could expect to safely lose 5 pounds in a week. That is considering diet alone. It is possible that he could lose even more if his activity level were increased. Each situation is unique. Is it sustainable? Maybe. There are a lot of factors that come into play as to whether or not it can be done safely.

    Not sustainable. On a long enough time line, no weight loss is sustainable. Eventually it will have to be some amount less, and chances are good one will lose lean mass if the deficit is above 31 calories per pound of current body fat per day.

    I get a 400 pounds and eating 1300 calories with a sedentary TDEE is about 4 pounds though.

    I might have my spreadsheet set to light activity. Interesting info about the 31 calories. If the guy is 40% bf, that would give him a window of around 5000 calories, right?

    ETA: Of course that percentage would probably bring down is expenditure as well.
    edited March 2016
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