Calorie Counter

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Does anyone else find this creepy?

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  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 9,369Member Member Posts: 9,369Member Member
    It's an advertisement modeled as advice. Not everyone is paying attention enough to understand the underlying misinformation here. The average consumer is the one who gets hurt.

    Aren't all ads modeled as advice? I mean, if they said "you'd have to be an idiot to spend your hard earned money on our product" nobody would buy anything, right? People need to use common sense, be selective about where they get their information. You can't jut believe everything you read, especially when it comes from somebody who's trying to sell you something. People need some healthy skepticism.

    I agree that a lot of people are being hurt by their diet, and a lot of them don't know any better. Personally I think that's a really sad and shameful thing, and also a complex problem. If we're going to solve it, we'll need a complex solution.
  • BecomingBaneBecomingBane Posts: 3,648Member Member Posts: 3,648Member Member
    If you find this creepy, I hate to think of how you view 90 percent of the conversations that happen on this website. This isn't creepy. It's actually really good advice and a good campaign.

    And here we are.

    This is why it's a debate. Just cluing you to that fact that this nonsense about "all calories are equal" is intentionally and discretely propagated by major food companies for very good reason... profit and to undermine real evidence. If they can't get the fake nonprofit to endorse them, at least they've got the PSAs and some of you preaching their message.

    Is there a reason why you keep referring to an ad as a "PSA"?

    And would you prefer it if major food companies *didn't* acknowledge that excess calories will lead to weight gain?

    "Balance what you, eat, drink, and do" sure sounds like helpful advice. Who's giving it? Soda companies. Why? They want to encourage people to buy soda... Can you connect the dots?

    Yes. It's an ad. To sell soda. That's why people are asking why you keep referring to it as a "PSA."

    Your outrage seems to stem from a misunderstanding of what it actually is. That space isn't donated to the company, they purchase the right to display the message to us. We can then balance what we know about advertising (it's designed to get us to buy stuff) to help determine if we want to purchase the product.

    Many ads contain "advice-like" content. Some of it is accurate, some of it is less so. If this upsets you, I can only imagine you must be annoyed frequently.

    I knew when I woke up this morning that soda companies wanted me to buy soda. This isn't news. On the whole, I prefer their acknowledgment that excess calories are harmful than them pretending this isn't the case.

    Well, that's good for you, in the bubble where you live. I suppose maybe I've been over-exposed to the human suffering related to the debilitating and mortal effects of diabetes... among so many other issues in our current health epidemic.

    In the bubble where I live? My father died of multiple organ failure related to heart disease and diabetes (unrelated to soda, which he never drank). Your assumptions about my life are seriously out of line.

    Stop assuming that everyone who disagrees with you doesn't know anything about the impact of obesity and/or diabetes. It may make you feel better to think that, but it isn't true. Consider this: people can have legitimate disagreement with your positions without being ignorant.

    Same... father, heart disease
    Step father, heart disease and diabetes
    Grandmother- diabetes
    Grandfather - heart disease, diabetes, and emphysema

    None of them drank soda, or if they did it was diet only
  • CrisseydaCrisseyda Posts: 532Member Member Posts: 532Member Member
    If you find this creepy, I hate to think of how you view 90 percent of the conversations that happen on this website. This isn't creepy. It's actually really good advice and a good campaign.

    And here we are.

    This is why it's a debate. Just cluing you to that fact that this nonsense about "all calories are equal" is intentionally and discretely propagated by major food companies for very good reason... profit and to undermine real evidence. If they can't get the fake nonprofit to endorse them, at least they've got the PSAs and some of you preaching their message.

    Is there a reason why you keep referring to an ad as a "PSA"?

    And would you prefer it if major food companies *didn't* acknowledge that excess calories will lead to weight gain?

    "Balance what you, eat, drink, and do" sure sounds like helpful advice. Who's giving it? Soda companies. Why? They want to encourage people to buy soda... Can you connect the dots?

    Yes. It's an ad. To sell soda. That's why people are asking why you keep referring to it as a "PSA."

    Your outrage seems to stem from a misunderstanding of what it actually is. That space isn't donated to the company, they purchase the right to display the message to us. We can then balance what we know about advertising (it's designed to get us to buy stuff) to help determine if we want to purchase the product.

    Many ads contain "advice-like" content. Some of it is accurate, some of it is less so. If this upsets you, I can only imagine you must be annoyed frequently.

    I knew when I woke up this morning that soda companies wanted me to buy soda. This isn't news. On the whole, I prefer their acknowledgment that excess calories are harmful than them pretending this isn't the case.

    Well, that's good for you, in the bubble where you live. I suppose maybe I've been over-exposed to the human suffering related to the debilitating and mortal effects of diabetes... among so many other issues in our current health epidemic.

    In the bubble where I live? My father died of multiple organ failure related to heart disease and diabetes (unrelated to soda, which he never drank). Your assumptions about my life are seriously out of line.

    Stop assuming that everyone who disagrees with you doesn't know anything about the impact of obesity and/or diabetes. It may make you feel better to think that, but it isn't true. Consider this: people can have legitimate disagreement with your positions without being ignorant.

    You accuse me of unjustified "outrage" which escalates my stance of feeling like it was "creepy," but makes it easier for you to tear down. Your response focused on yourself and your own perspective. How you woke up, how you felt. If you aren't in touch with why this matters, then it hasn't reached your "bubble." Just because you don't care about it and it doesn't affect you, doesn't mean it's not a real issue, and it doesn't matter.
    edited April 2016
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 20,809Member Member Posts: 20,809Member Member
    If you find this creepy, I hate to think of how you view 90 percent of the conversations that happen on this website. This isn't creepy. It's actually really good advice and a good campaign.

    And here we are.

    This is why it's a debate. Just cluing you to that fact that this nonsense about "all calories are equal" is intentionally and discretely propagated by major food companies for very good reason... profit and to undermine real evidence. If they can't get the fake nonprofit to endorse them, at least they've got the PSAs and some of you preaching their message.

    Is there a reason why you keep referring to an ad as a "PSA"?

    And would you prefer it if major food companies *didn't* acknowledge that excess calories will lead to weight gain?

    "Balance what you, eat, drink, and do" sure sounds like helpful advice. Who's giving it? Soda companies. Why? They want to encourage people to buy soda... Can you connect the dots?

    Yes. It's an ad. To sell soda. That's why people are asking why you keep referring to it as a "PSA."

    Your outrage seems to stem from a misunderstanding of what it actually is. That space isn't donated to the company, they purchase the right to display the message to us. We can then balance what we know about advertising (it's designed to get us to buy stuff) to help determine if we want to purchase the product.

    Many ads contain "advice-like" content. Some of it is accurate, some of it is less so. If this upsets you, I can only imagine you must be annoyed frequently.

    I knew when I woke up this morning that soda companies wanted me to buy soda. This isn't news. On the whole, I prefer their acknowledgment that excess calories are harmful than them pretending this isn't the case.

    Well, that's good for you, in the bubble where you live. I suppose maybe I've been over-exposed to the human suffering related to the debilitating and mortal effects of diabetes... among so many other issues in our current health epidemic.

    In the bubble where I live? My father died of multiple organ failure related to heart disease and diabetes (unrelated to soda, which he never drank). Your assumptions about my life are seriously out of line.

    Stop assuming that everyone who disagrees with you doesn't know anything about the impact of obesity and/or diabetes. It may make you feel better to think that, but it isn't true. Consider this: people can have legitimate disagreement with your positions without being ignorant.

    Same... father, heart disease
    Step father, heart disease and diabetes
    Grandmother- diabetes
    Grandfather - heart disease, diabetes, and emphysema

    None of them drank soda, or if they did it was diet only

    Sorry for your losses . . . it truly does suck to watch.
  • RobD520RobD520 Posts: 419Member Member Posts: 419Member Member
    RobD520 wrote: »
    The more active you are, the higher your TDEE, which makes it easier to fit treats/soda into your diet in moderation while still losing/maintaining your weight. Many people can easily have a serving of soda if they want and still hit their calorie and macro goals for the day.

    If someone chooses to over-consume anything, whether it's soda or smoked salmon, that's their choice.

    Of course Pepsi and Coca Cola are trying to make a profit - they're businesses. It's what businesses do! :smile:

    Question for you, is 150 calories of soda per day overconsumption? about one can. Because that will increase your risk of diabetes 11 times versus another source of calories.

    Can you please provide a source for this?

    Since Mayo Clinic doesn't even list soda consumption as a risk factor for T2DM (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/basics/risk-factors/con-20033091), I find it hard to believe that someone at a healthy weight, living an active lifestyle, with a balanced diet and no family history of diabetes would be put more at risk by having 150 calories of soda from time to time.

    I don't think the things Mayo Clinic includes under dietary factors is intended to be an exhaustive list.

    My point was the other risk factors - overweight, sedentary, family history, high cholesterol/triglycerides, hypertension, ethnicity - play a larger part than consuming soda/sugar in moderate amounts.

    You have to look at the context of someone's diet and lifestyle as a whole. You can blame one thing.

    But it's a lot easier to demonize a particular food than it is to look at the context in which people actually become obese.

    Full calorie soda consumption is falling in America. If soda caused obesity, we'd be seeing a corresponding rate of weight loss. Spoiler alert . . .

    This would only be true of everything else were held constant, right?
  • ryry_ryry_ Posts: 4,966Member Member Posts: 4,966Member Member
    If you find this creepy, I hate to think of how you view 90 percent of the conversations that happen on this website. This isn't creepy. It's actually really good advice and a good campaign.

    And here we are.

    This is why it's a debate. Just cluing you to that fact that this nonsense about "all calories are equal" is intentionally and discretely propagated by major food companies for very good reason... profit and to undermine real evidence. If they can't get the fake nonprofit to endorse them, at least they've got the PSAs and some of you preaching their message.

    Is there a reason why you keep referring to an ad as a "PSA"?

    And would you prefer it if major food companies *didn't* acknowledge that excess calories will lead to weight gain?

    "Balance what you, eat, drink, and do" sure sounds like helpful advice. Who's giving it? Soda companies. Why? They want to encourage people to buy soda... Can you connect the dots?

    Yes. It's an ad. To sell soda. That's why people are asking why you keep referring to it as a "PSA."

    Your outrage seems to stem from a misunderstanding of what it actually is. That space isn't donated to the company, they purchase the right to display the message to us. We can then balance what we know about advertising (it's designed to get us to buy stuff) to help determine if we want to purchase the product.

    Many ads contain "advice-like" content. Some of it is accurate, some of it is less so. If this upsets you, I can only imagine you must be annoyed frequently.

    I knew when I woke up this morning that soda companies wanted me to buy soda. This isn't news. On the whole, I prefer their acknowledgment that excess calories are harmful than them pretending this isn't the case.

    Well, that's good for you, in the bubble where you live. I suppose maybe I've been over-exposed to the human suffering related to the debilitating and mortal effects of diabetes... among so many other issues in our current health epidemic.

    In the bubble where I live? My father died of multiple organ failure related to heart disease and diabetes (unrelated to soda, which he never drank). Your assumptions about my life are seriously out of line.

    Stop assuming that everyone who disagrees with you doesn't know anything about the impact of obesity and/or diabetes. It may make you feel better to think that, but it isn't true. Consider this: people can have legitimate disagreement with your positions without being ignorant.

    You accuse me of unjustified "outrage" which escalates my stance of feeling like it was "creepy," but makes it easier for you to tear down. Your response focused on yourself and your own perspective. How you woke up, how you felt. If you aren't in touch with why this matters, then it hasn't reached your "bubble." Just because you don't care about it and it doesn't affect you, doesn't mean it's not a real issue, and it doesn't matter.

    Please elaborate on why it would be better to not have a sign on that vending machine that says the equivalent of please consume our product in a balanced manner that takes into account your overrall intake and activity level.
  • brower47brower47 Posts: 16,369Member Member Posts: 16,369Member Member
    tomteboda wrote: »
    There are studies showing sitting too much is bad for you, or that those with diabetes and other conditions who add in walking are healthier than those that don't.

    How dare La-Z-Boy make comfortable chairs! And recliners that hold people over 180 lbs. We better get out the anti-corporation boycott materials!

    Big chair is doing a lot of damage to this country.
  • CrisseydaCrisseyda Posts: 532Member Member Posts: 532Member Member
    ryry62685 wrote: »
    If you find this creepy, I hate to think of how you view 90 percent of the conversations that happen on this website. This isn't creepy. It's actually really good advice and a good campaign.

    And here we are.

    This is why it's a debate. Just cluing you to that fact that this nonsense about "all calories are equal" is intentionally and discretely propagated by major food companies for very good reason... profit and to undermine real evidence. If they can't get the fake nonprofit to endorse them, at least they've got the PSAs and some of you preaching their message.

    Is there a reason why you keep referring to an ad as a "PSA"?

    And would you prefer it if major food companies *didn't* acknowledge that excess calories will lead to weight gain?

    "Balance what you, eat, drink, and do" sure sounds like helpful advice. Who's giving it? Soda companies. Why? They want to encourage people to buy soda... Can you connect the dots?

    Yes. It's an ad. To sell soda. That's why people are asking why you keep referring to it as a "PSA."

    Your outrage seems to stem from a misunderstanding of what it actually is. That space isn't donated to the company, they purchase the right to display the message to us. We can then balance what we know about advertising (it's designed to get us to buy stuff) to help determine if we want to purchase the product.

    Many ads contain "advice-like" content. Some of it is accurate, some of it is less so. If this upsets you, I can only imagine you must be annoyed frequently.

    I knew when I woke up this morning that soda companies wanted me to buy soda. This isn't news. On the whole, I prefer their acknowledgment that excess calories are harmful than them pretending this isn't the case.

    Well, that's good for you, in the bubble where you live. I suppose maybe I've been over-exposed to the human suffering related to the debilitating and mortal effects of diabetes... among so many other issues in our current health epidemic.

    In the bubble where I live? My father died of multiple organ failure related to heart disease and diabetes (unrelated to soda, which he never drank). Your assumptions about my life are seriously out of line.

    Stop assuming that everyone who disagrees with you doesn't know anything about the impact of obesity and/or diabetes. It may make you feel better to think that, but it isn't true. Consider this: people can have legitimate disagreement with your positions without being ignorant.

    You accuse me of unjustified "outrage" which escalates my stance of feeling like it was "creepy," but makes it easier for you to tear down. Your response focused on yourself and your own perspective. How you woke up, how you felt. If you aren't in touch with why this matters, then it hasn't reached your "bubble." Just because you don't care about it and it doesn't affect you, doesn't mean it's not a real issue, and it doesn't matter.

    Please elaborate on why it would be better to not have a sign on that vending machine that says the equivalent of please consume our product in a balanced manner that takes into account your overrall intake and activity level.

    I've done a fair job explaining the context of that sign in terms of Coke's involvement in obesity research and why they endorse that message. Maybe go back and the read the thread if you missed it.
  • tincanonastringtincanonastring Posts: 3,969Member Member Posts: 3,969Member Member
    ryry62685 wrote: »
    If you find this creepy, I hate to think of how you view 90 percent of the conversations that happen on this website. This isn't creepy. It's actually really good advice and a good campaign.

    And here we are.

    This is why it's a debate. Just cluing you to that fact that this nonsense about "all calories are equal" is intentionally and discretely propagated by major food companies for very good reason... profit and to undermine real evidence. If they can't get the fake nonprofit to endorse them, at least they've got the PSAs and some of you preaching their message.

    Is there a reason why you keep referring to an ad as a "PSA"?

    And would you prefer it if major food companies *didn't* acknowledge that excess calories will lead to weight gain?

    "Balance what you, eat, drink, and do" sure sounds like helpful advice. Who's giving it? Soda companies. Why? They want to encourage people to buy soda... Can you connect the dots?

    Yes. It's an ad. To sell soda. That's why people are asking why you keep referring to it as a "PSA."

    Your outrage seems to stem from a misunderstanding of what it actually is. That space isn't donated to the company, they purchase the right to display the message to us. We can then balance what we know about advertising (it's designed to get us to buy stuff) to help determine if we want to purchase the product.

    Many ads contain "advice-like" content. Some of it is accurate, some of it is less so. If this upsets you, I can only imagine you must be annoyed frequently.

    I knew when I woke up this morning that soda companies wanted me to buy soda. This isn't news. On the whole, I prefer their acknowledgment that excess calories are harmful than them pretending this isn't the case.

    Well, that's good for you, in the bubble where you live. I suppose maybe I've been over-exposed to the human suffering related to the debilitating and mortal effects of diabetes... among so many other issues in our current health epidemic.

    In the bubble where I live? My father died of multiple organ failure related to heart disease and diabetes (unrelated to soda, which he never drank). Your assumptions about my life are seriously out of line.

    Stop assuming that everyone who disagrees with you doesn't know anything about the impact of obesity and/or diabetes. It may make you feel better to think that, but it isn't true. Consider this: people can have legitimate disagreement with your positions without being ignorant.

    You accuse me of unjustified "outrage" which escalates my stance of feeling like it was "creepy," but makes it easier for you to tear down. Your response focused on yourself and your own perspective. How you woke up, how you felt. If you aren't in touch with why this matters, then it hasn't reached your "bubble." Just because you don't care about it and it doesn't affect you, doesn't mean it's not a real issue, and it doesn't matter.

    Please elaborate on why it would be better to not have a sign on that vending machine that says the equivalent of please consume our product in a balanced manner that takes into account your overrall intake and activity level.

    I've done a fair job explaining the context of that sign in terms of Coke's involvement in obesity research and why they endorse that message. Maybe go back and the read the thread if you missed it.

    That's not what he asked.
This discussion has been closed.