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Does anyone else find this creepy?

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  • Alyssa_Is_LosingItAlyssa_Is_LosingIt Posts: 4,684Member Member Posts: 4,684Member Member
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    That doesn't change the glaring problems with the study that you posted, which other people have pointed out and you've yet to counter.

    You also did not respond to the Mayo Clinic link that I posted that outlined the main risk factors for diabetes (soda not being one of them). What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?
  • CrisseydaCrisseyda Posts: 532Member Member Posts: 532Member Member
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    That doesn't change the glaring problems with the study that you posted, which other people have pointed out and you've yet to counter.

    You also did not respond to the Mayo Clinic link that I posted that outlined the main risk factors for diabetes (soda not being one of them). What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    You're welcome to post another thread regarding that topic.
  • sunnybeaches105sunnybeaches105 Posts: 2,846Member Member Posts: 2,846Member Member
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    Public health experts must worry about the bottom half of the nation who couldn't read the nutritional information on the back of a box, let alone an abstract or study. Trying to help that crowd is an exercise in frustration. It's why these messages to the general public are so simplified. It's why messages get broken down to alcohol is bad. Water is good. Colored veggies are good. Stuff in a box is bad, etc.

    Drinking a soda as a treat and part of a balanced diet within one's TDEE isn't going to harm an otherwise healthy person.
  • CrisseydaCrisseyda Posts: 532Member Member Posts: 532Member Member
    So, if you're refusing to debate people who are offering rebuttals to your OP, I guess this doesn't actually belong in the debate section.

    It's a totally new discussion, so it should be another post. Is that not forum etiquette?
  • RobD520RobD520 Posts: 419Member Member Posts: 419Member Member
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    The more active you are, the higher your TDEE, which makes it easier to fit treats/soda into your diet in moderation while still losing/maintaining your weight. Many people can easily have a serving of soda if they want and still hit their calorie and macro goals for the day.

    If someone chooses to over-consume anything, whether it's soda or smoked salmon, that's their choice.

    Of course Pepsi and Coca Cola are trying to make a profit - they're businesses. It's what businesses do! :smile:

    Question for you, is 150 calories of soda per day overconsumption? about one can. Because that will increase your risk of diabetes 11 times versus another source of calories.

    Can you please provide a source for this?

    Since Mayo Clinic doesn't even list soda consumption as a risk factor for T2DM (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/basics/risk-factors/con-20033091), I find it hard to believe that someone at a healthy weight, living an active lifestyle, with a balanced diet and no family history of diabetes would be put more at risk by having 150 calories of soda from time to time.

    I don't think the things Mayo Clinic includes under dietary factors is intended to be an exhaustive list.

    My point was the other risk factors - overweight, sedentary, family history, high cholesterol/triglycerides, hypertension, ethnicity - play a larger part than consuming soda/sugar in moderate amounts.

    You have to look at the context of someone's diet and lifestyle as a whole. You can blame one thing.

    But it's a lot easier to demonize a particular food than it is to look at the context in which people actually become obese.

    Full calorie soda consumption is falling in America. If soda caused obesity, we'd be seeing a corresponding rate of weight loss. Spoiler alert . . .

    This would only be true of everything else were held constant, right?

    If obesity is caused by one thing (soda consumption), then lowering soda consumption would have results. But if other things not being constant can also impact soda consumption, then obesity isn't caused exclusively by soda consumption.

    I agree 100%.

    I didn't think anyone was arguing that soda consumption was the exclusive cause of obesity; but I may have missed it.

    If it isn't the cause of obesity, then I don't see the issue with soda companies reminding people to balance the calories they consume with the calories that they burn.

    I believe soda plays a significant role in childhood obesity. It would be silly to consider it the sole cause. I still personally don't have any issue with the soda companies advocating activity.
    edited April 2016
  • Alyssa_Is_LosingItAlyssa_Is_LosingIt Posts: 4,684Member Member Posts: 4,684Member Member
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    That doesn't change the glaring problems with the study that you posted, which other people have pointed out and you've yet to counter.

    You also did not respond to the Mayo Clinic link that I posted that outlined the main risk factors for diabetes (soda not being one of them). What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    You're welcome to post another thread regarding that topic.

    It is within the realm of what you're discussing. You said:
    Question for you, is 150 calories of soda per day overconsumption? about one can. Because that will increase your risk of diabetes 11 times versus another source of calories.

    I responded to your statement with the Mayo Clinic link and my argument regarding diabetes. You then decided that it was off-topic.

    Though you were the one who brought up diabetes. You posted the study, which is related to diabetes risk, and people are countering the points that the study attempted to make.
    edited April 2016
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 20,809Member Member Posts: 20,809Member Member
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    The more active you are, the higher your TDEE, which makes it easier to fit treats/soda into your diet in moderation while still losing/maintaining your weight. Many people can easily have a serving of soda if they want and still hit their calorie and macro goals for the day.

    If someone chooses to over-consume anything, whether it's soda or smoked salmon, that's their choice.

    Of course Pepsi and Coca Cola are trying to make a profit - they're businesses. It's what businesses do! :smile:

    Question for you, is 150 calories of soda per day overconsumption? about one can. Because that will increase your risk of diabetes 11 times versus another source of calories.

    Can you please provide a source for this?

    Since Mayo Clinic doesn't even list soda consumption as a risk factor for T2DM (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/basics/risk-factors/con-20033091), I find it hard to believe that someone at a healthy weight, living an active lifestyle, with a balanced diet and no family history of diabetes would be put more at risk by having 150 calories of soda from time to time.

    I don't think the things Mayo Clinic includes under dietary factors is intended to be an exhaustive list.

    My point was the other risk factors - overweight, sedentary, family history, high cholesterol/triglycerides, hypertension, ethnicity - play a larger part than consuming soda/sugar in moderate amounts.

    You have to look at the context of someone's diet and lifestyle as a whole. You can blame one thing.

    But it's a lot easier to demonize a particular food than it is to look at the context in which people actually become obese.

    Full calorie soda consumption is falling in America. If soda caused obesity, we'd be seeing a corresponding rate of weight loss. Spoiler alert . . .

    This would only be true of everything else were held constant, right?

    If obesity is caused by one thing (soda consumption), then lowering soda consumption would have results. But if other things not being constant can also impact soda consumption, then obesity isn't caused exclusively by soda consumption.

    I agree 100%.

    I didn't think anyone was arguing that soda consumption was the exclusive cause of obesity; but I may have missed it.

    If it isn't the cause of obesity, then I don't see the issue with soda companies reminding people to balance the calories they consume with the calories that they burn.

    I believe soda plays a significant role in childhood obesity. It would be silly to consider it the sole cause. I still personally don't have any issue with the soda companies advocating activity.

    I think consuming more calories than one burns is what is leading to childhood obesity. Can those calories be in the form of soda (or other caloric drinks)? Absolutely. But consuming soda in the context of balancing calories in and calories out -- I'm aware of nothing showing that this is going to lead to obesity.

    That's why I think, generally, the message to balance what you eat and what you do is a sound message (even though it is coming from people who want you to purchase soda).
  • CrisseydaCrisseyda Posts: 532Member Member Posts: 532Member Member
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    That doesn't change the glaring problems with the study that you posted, which other people have pointed out and you've yet to counter.

    You also did not respond to the Mayo Clinic link that I posted that outlined the main risk factors for diabetes (soda not being one of them). What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    @Alyssa_Is_LosingIt
    The Mayo Clinic article looks like it's written at a 6th grade level, like most patient education sheets. It doesn't mention diet at all. Is this supposed to mean that diet plays no part in the development of Type 2 Diabetes?

    As far as your question: What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    Yeah, that's another topic and a little convoluted. Not sure where you're trying to go there, but just start another topic.
    edited April 2016
  • zbakrjczbakrjc Posts: 87Deleted Member Posts: 87Deleted Member
    So, if you're refusing to debate people who are offering rebuttals to your OP, I guess this doesn't actually belong in the debate section.

    It's a totally new discussion, so it should be another post. Is that not forum etiquette?

    Your OP says " If you get people to believe the myth that liquid sugar is just a few harmless "extra calories" they need to burn off (not that, for one thing, it independently raises one's risk of diabetes by 11 fold compared to an increase in calories from any other source). . . " If you're saying that discussing this claim is a totally new discussion, I don't understand.

    There's nothing wrong with having a few extra calories if you can burn them off through exercise. That sounds balanced to me. It doesn't matter if that comes from a soda, beer, or chocolate so long as you're getting an overall balance of carbs/protein/fat.
    edited April 2016
  • snikkinssnikkins Posts: 1,282Member Member Posts: 1,282Member Member
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    The more active you are, the higher your TDEE, which makes it easier to fit treats/soda into your diet in moderation while still losing/maintaining your weight. Many people can easily have a serving of soda if they want and still hit their calorie and macro goals for the day.

    If someone chooses to over-consume anything, whether it's soda or smoked salmon, that's their choice.

    Of course Pepsi and Coca Cola are trying to make a profit - they're businesses. It's what businesses do! :smile:

    Question for you, is 150 calories of soda per day overconsumption? about one can. Because that will increase your risk of diabetes 11 times versus another source of calories.

    Can you please provide a source for this?

    Since Mayo Clinic doesn't even list soda consumption as a risk factor for T2DM (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/basics/risk-factors/con-20033091), I find it hard to believe that someone at a healthy weight, living an active lifestyle, with a balanced diet and no family history of diabetes would be put more at risk by having 150 calories of soda from time to time.

    I don't think the things Mayo Clinic includes under dietary factors is intended to be an exhaustive list.

    My point was the other risk factors - overweight, sedentary, family history, high cholesterol/triglycerides, hypertension, ethnicity - play a larger part than consuming soda/sugar in moderate amounts.

    You have to look at the context of someone's diet and lifestyle as a whole. You can blame one thing.

    But it's a lot easier to demonize a particular food than it is to look at the context in which people actually become obese.

    Full calorie soda consumption is falling in America. If soda caused obesity, we'd be seeing a corresponding rate of weight loss. Spoiler alert . . .

    This would only be true of everything else were held constant, right?

    If obesity is caused by one thing (soda consumption), then lowering soda consumption would have results. But if other things not being constant can also impact soda consumption, then obesity isn't caused exclusively by soda consumption.

    I agree 100%.

    I didn't think anyone was arguing that soda consumption was the exclusive cause of obesity; but I may have missed it.

    If it isn't the cause of obesity, then I don't see the issue with soda companies reminding people to balance the calories they consume with the calories that they burn.

    I believe soda plays a significant role in childhood obesity. It would be silly to consider it the sole cause. I still personally don't have any issue with the soda companies advocating activity.

    I think it's also fruit juices, though, and perhaps gaining a larger market. Soda = bad but fruit juices = good.

    I also don't see a problem with soda companies advocating activity.
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Posts: 4,076Member Member Posts: 4,076Member Member
    If you (or a soda company) think a sticker on a cooler is going to influence my buying habits--well, you're both wrong. As for being "creepy", no I don't think so. You are exagerating to move your OP. Do I think soda is an OK thing? No, I haven't had a soda for years. Anybody that wants one can educate themselves and make their own decision.
  • HornsbyHornsby Posts: 10,372Member Member Posts: 10,372Member Member
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    That doesn't change the glaring problems with the study that you posted, which other people have pointed out and you've yet to counter.

    You also did not respond to the Mayo Clinic link that I posted that outlined the main risk factors for diabetes (soda not being one of them). What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    @Alyssa_Is_LosingIt
    The Mayo Clinic article looks like it's written at a 6th grade level, like most patient education sheets. It doesn't mention diet at all. Is this supposed to mean that diet plays no part in the development of Type 2 Diabetes?

    As far as your question: What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    Yeah, that's another topic and a little convoluted. Not sure where you're trying to go there, but just start another topic.

    Diet plays a role in the sense that over consumption can cause obesity, which can cause T2D. There is no one food responsible for it though...
  • Alyssa_Is_LosingItAlyssa_Is_LosingIt Posts: 4,684Member Member Posts: 4,684Member Member
    If you don't think it's a problem, that's your prerogative. It seems Forbes reported on it, so if you want more information about the issue, here's an article for you.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/nancyhuehnergarth/2015/12/02/coca-coca-shuts-down-anti-obesity-network-but-still-teaches-energy-balance-in-schools/#70a13ada6d31

    The now-defunct GEBN is only one of numerous campaigns, programs and organizations that Big Soda uses to spread its unscientific message of energy balance. The soda industry is even in our schools telling children as young as two, ‘don’t drink less soda, just exercise more.’

    Public health experts have long criticized the soda industry’s focus on energy balance as a tactic to deflect attention from its unhealthy portfolio of sugary drinks.


    It seems "public health experts" and I share similar views. If you disagree, that's your prerogative too. If someone else would offer research instead of opinion and anecdote, that would be great too.

    That doesn't change the glaring problems with the study that you posted, which other people have pointed out and you've yet to counter.

    You also did not respond to the Mayo Clinic link that I posted that outlined the main risk factors for diabetes (soda not being one of them). What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    @Alyssa_Is_LosingIt
    The Mayo Clinic article looks like it's written at a 6th grade level, like most patient education sheets. It doesn't mention diet at all. Is this supposed to mean that diet plays no part in the development of Type 2 Diabetes?

    As far as your question: What would your opinion be on the argument that the context of one's dietary and lifestyle habits in conjunction with the other risk factors for diabetes matters more than moderate soda consumption within one's calorie goals?

    Yeah, that's another topic and a little convoluted. Not sure where you're trying to go there, but just start another topic.

    It is not another topic - the study you posted discusses diabetes risk; I am discussing diabetes risk, and how other risk factors are weighted against soda consumption. I don't see how it's a "different topic" unless you're just trying to avoid discussing it.

    I'd like to know what you mean by "convoluted."
This discussion has been closed.