Calorie Counter

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I Don't Believe in Calorie Counting

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  • JustMissTracyJustMissTracy Posts: 6,389Member Member Posts: 6,389Member Member
    Bronty3 wrote: »
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    Based on the previously posted picture, assuming she's not the chunky one near the door, she doesn't appear to be at all hideous.

    It is literally only two very thin women. There is not a "chunky" one in the mirror. It's a reflection of the tall thin one. You could have just clicked and watched 2 seconds of the video. Sounds to me like you maybe don't have the healthiest attitude and relationship with food or weight. Calling a slightly overweight person "chunky" and hideous means you have some of your own issues you maybe should have a conversation with yourself about. Do some soul searching of your own. You're rather judgmental and hostile to anyone who has gained weight and is losing it in a healthy way on here by counting calories.

    Actually, I didn't call the woman hideous, someone else did. I said she, Tracey, was anything but.

    But yep, I did refer to the one by the door as chunky. Fat is not the new fit, no matter how vociferously people lobby for FA.

    And you actually see the one by the door at "fat" or "chunky"? You must have some high standards where weight is concerned.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    tlflag1620 wrote: »
    It's the act of logging that works magic for me, maybe even more than the calorie counting. I can be loosey goosey with my calorie goals and still do fine. I think logging automatically makes me more mindful about what I am eating.

    ETA: By "what I am eating" I actually mean "how much I am eating" not just quality. I also want to add that counting calories has allowed me to lose more slowly and sustainably than any diet in the past.

    A million times this! Waaaay back in the days of yore, before Google was a thing, I kept a food journal. Since food companies were not yet required to put nutrition facts (including calorie counts) on labels, it would have been difficult, to say the least, to get an accurate idea of the calories I was consuming. But I could see what I was eating, as well as how much (I recorded appx quantities). That act is eye-opening and you can really see your patterns, foods that you tend to overdo, food groups you may be neglecting (veggies I'm lookin at you), and simply having the accountability (if to no one else but yourself) associated with putting what you ate in writing is very helpful. Calorie counting adds further info, as does tracking macros, and more info is almost always a good thing!

    Yeah, I agree with this too. I lost a bunch of weight in my early 30s and didn't count (it wasn't so easy back then), but I did write down a few prior days to get an understanding of how I'd been eating and then journaled for a while. It was really helpful.
  • AestheticStarAestheticStar Posts: 447Member Member Posts: 447Member Member
    I stopped counting calories. Before I found MFP, I used to eat what I wanted, not restrict, not count or obsess over it. I did my workouts as normal & I lost weight & was lean & perfectly fine. When I ended up counting calories, I have never struggled more in my life. It was the worst mistake I ever made. I have seen more & more fitness trainers coming forward & talking about how damaging calorie restriction is for your metabolism & can lead to metabolic damage.

    If people don't believe it, watch this video I put a link to at the end. Kelli (Fitness Blender) is straight-forward, she wouldn't lie, she talks about her calorie restriction, which lead to an eating disorder & she struggled with weight. As soon as she broke away from that, she started eating more calories & overcame it. Even Cassey Ho from Blogilates posted about metabolic damage when she was doing a bikini competition where the trainer made her eat only 1,000 calorie A DAY. Your body NEEDS nutrition. And look at all the people on the Biggest Loser who restricted, went on to live their lives & gained all, if not MORE, weight back. It happens to so many celebs that go on calorie restrictive diets. It is NOT worth it IMO. I log my workout calories & my food, but I do not care about the numbers of it, I just enjoy tracking what I've done for a workout & what I've ate. And the more I've been eating lately, I feel more like my old self, I have energy, I feel happy.

    This is the video Kelli posted from Fitness Blender. I really recommend people watch it, it might be eye opening.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=VM99CXSPcVM
  • moe0303moe0303 Posts: 933Member Member Posts: 933Member Member
    I still say it depends. Counting calories has the ability to better any diet because it empowers the individual by providing data to make informed decisions on which food choices to restrict. I think there are a number of diets which restrict food choices by their design. I suspect in both cases most people will find that there is a significant overlap in the kinds of foods which were restricted either through governance or abstinence.
  • PamelaW41PamelaW41 Posts: 287Member Member Posts: 287Member Member
    I count calories, I'm obsessive and I do not have a good relationship with food. I see all food as bad and fattening, but I eat it anyways bc you have to, but I still feel guilty of eating. I use to be 100 pounds over weight. I think anyone who gets to that point and loses it, has a distorted view of food, fear of gaining weight is always in my mind. For years all I heard was eat less and move more. Yesterday my doctor said eat more and exercise less...I'm never right!?!?! Anyways, my point is counting calories is important for me bc I feel like I am in control of my eating, I can make sure I don't eat too much....or too little. No matter what other people think (even the doctor) I know me, I know I can not stop being diligent unless I want to gain the weight back. AND I never want to go through that again. For me it is much easier to keep it off than it was to lose it.
  • MommyMeggoMommyMeggo Posts: 1,222Member Member Posts: 1,222Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    PamelaW41 wrote: »
    I count calories, I'm obsessive and I do not have a good relationship with food. I see all food as bad and fattening, but I eat it anyways bc you have to, but I still feel guilty of eating. I use to be 100 pounds over weight. I think anyone who gets to that point and loses it, has a distorted view of food, fear of gaining weight is always in my mind. For years all I heard was eat less and move more. Yesterday my doctor said eat more and exercise less...I'm never right!?!?! Anyways, my point is counting calories is important for me bc I feel like I am in control of my eating, I can make sure I don't eat too much....or too little. No matter what other people think (even the doctor) I know me, I know I can not stop being diligent unless I want to gain the weight back. AND I never want to go through that again. For me it is much easier to keep it off than it was to lose it.

    Wow....
    1) You admit that you're obsessive and see food as a bad thing.
    2) Your doctor likely recognizes your issues because they advised you to lessen your calorie restrictions and lighten up on the exercise (based on your post I wouldn't be surprised if you're following a VLCD and engaging in extreme amounts of exercise which is not good for you).
    3) You assume that people who were once overweight but lost the weight all have a disordered view of food when in reality it's more likely that they were once ignorant about food or didn't care but learned how to eat well for their goals.

    Scary, scary post...

    Listen to your doctor.

    +1
  • AnthonyThrashD_AnthonyThrashD_ Posts: 85Member Member Posts: 85Member Member
    Ideas are tools, but sometimes the best tool for the job, isn't the tool you're best at using. Use what you're best at to accomplish goal. I think calorie counting is the best tool for weight loss, but a few people seem incapable of weighing & logging consistently. Maybe a real-time caloric restriction like "portion size and frequency awareness" is for them.
  • janekenney95janekenney95 Posts: 22Member, Premium Member Posts: 22Member, Premium Member
    Of course, dieting habits can vary from person to person. A lot of people do not understand the difference between counting calories and restricting calories. I try to eat as many (good) calories as possible, after coming off a bad relationship with food constantly restricting how much I ate, even if it was all the good stuff. I find that the less you restrict, the better you will feel. It is good to keep track, but instead of restricting, provide.
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