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Essential Oils

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  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    Months ago I tried using peppermint oil to help with my digestion, but the effects I noticed were minimal. However, I know others who have used essential oils for other conditions and have had success. I don't think they necessarily have magical properties, but I do think they can be useful for certain things if used properly.

    If I recall correctly, you were rubbing the oil on your stomach with the hopes that it would improve digestion.

    I still don't understand the biological mechanism to which it would affect digestion whatsoever.
    Since it can be used to relax the muscles in the abdominal area, controlling intestinal gut motility would be a benefit. Some other sources say that it has antibacterial properties as well. Granted, these effects are limited to only a component of the GI tract.

    :huh:

    What part of the gut do you think you are affecting by rubbing oil on your belly?
    Colon
    http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0401/p1027.html

    That article says:
    peppermint oil given via enema has been modestly effective for relief of colonic spasm in patients undergoing barium enemas.

    Rubbing it on your belly isn't the same as shooting it up your rectum.
    It also says, "there seems to be a trend indicating mild effectiveness in the reduction of some IBS symptoms, especially flatulence and abdominal pain and distension."

    BTW, I should also note I didn't get the idea to use the oil from the Internet, but rather a hard-copy book on essential oils.
    edited May 2016
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,424Member Member Posts: 24,424Member Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Months ago I tried using peppermint oil to help with my digestion, but the effects I noticed were minimal. However, I know others who have used essential oils for other conditions and have had success. I don't think they necessarily have magical properties, but I do think they can be useful for certain things if used properly.

    If I recall correctly, you were rubbing the oil on your stomach with the hopes that it would improve digestion.

    I still don't understand the biological mechanism to which it would affect digestion whatsoever.
    Since it can be used to relax the muscles in the abdominal area, controlling intestinal gut motility would be a benefit. Some other sources say that it has antibacterial properties as well. Granted, these effects are limited to only a component of the GI tract.

    :huh:

    What part of the gut do you think you are affecting by rubbing oil on your belly?
    Colon
    http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0401/p1027.html

    So enema?
  • _Waffle__Waffle_ Posts: 13,080Member Member Posts: 13,080Member Member
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    Months ago I tried using peppermint oil to help with my digestion, but the effects I noticed were minimal. However, I know others who have used essential oils for other conditions and have had success. I don't think they necessarily have magical properties, but I do think they can be useful for certain things if used properly.

    If I recall correctly, you were rubbing the oil on your stomach with the hopes that it would improve digestion.

    I still don't understand the biological mechanism to which it would affect digestion whatsoever.
    Since it can be used to relax the muscles in the abdominal area, controlling intestinal gut motility would be a benefit. Some other sources say that it has antibacterial properties as well. Granted, these effects are limited to only a component of the GI tract.

    :huh:

    What part of the gut do you think you are affecting by rubbing oil on your belly?
    Colon
    http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0401/p1027.html

    That article says:
    peppermint oil given via enema has been modestly effective for relief of colonic spasm in patients undergoing barium enemas.

    Rubbing it on your belly isn't the same as shooting it up your rectum.
    It also says, "there seems to be a trend indicating mild effectiveness in the reduction of some IBS symptoms, especially flatulence and abdominal pain and distension."

    BTW, I should also note I didn't get the idea to use the oil from the Internet, but rather a hard-copy book on essential oils.

    Yes, but it's talking about taking it orally. The only reference to applying it topically was used for the reduction of headaches. It clearly says at the top of this study:
    Dosage
    Adults: 0.2 to 0.4 mL of oil three times daily in enteric-coated capsules

    I don't think they intend for your to rub capsules on your belly. They also cite having coated capsules that bypass the upper GI tract and get absorbed in the lower intestines. This is 100% about taking oral doses of peppermint oil.
  • paulgads82paulgads82 Posts: 256Member Member Posts: 256Member Member
    Anecdotal, I've always found peppermint tea good for cramps, but I'd rather not have it up my rear.
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,424Member Member Posts: 24,424Member Member
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,424Member Member Posts: 24,424Member Member
    paulgads82 wrote: »
    Anecdotal, I've always found peppermint tea good for cramps, but I'd rather not have it up my rear.

    Coffee enema or GTFO!
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg
    When used with a carrier oil, they can get absorbed deep into the skin, however. There was a particular instance that I rubbed too much on my skin and felt nauseous within a few minutes.

  • paulgads82paulgads82 Posts: 256Member Member Posts: 256Member Member
    paulgads82 wrote: »
    Anecdotal, I've always found peppermint tea good for cramps, but I'd rather not have it up my rear.

    Coffee enema or GTFO!

    You don't want to know how many people have advised this to cure my chronic illness. Ok its 3 but that's 3 too many.
  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Posts: 2,272Member Member Posts: 2,272Member Member
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?
    edited May 2016
  • Springfield1970Springfield1970 Posts: 1,945Member Member Posts: 1,945Member Member
    So many giggles here x
  • queenliz99queenliz99 Posts: 15,358Member Member Posts: 15,358Member Member
    So many giggles here x

    Seriously
  • Springfield1970Springfield1970 Posts: 1,945Member Member Posts: 1,945Member Member
    Must add. Tea tree oil, in my house gets rid of nits, head lice, skin infections, gum infections, and a nasty lingering sinus infection (yes, I snorted it...diluted)

    Jason did you really think peppermint oil soaked all the way though your skin into your guts? Or did I read that wrong?
  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Posts: 2,272Member Member Posts: 2,272Member Member
    paulgads82 wrote: »
    paulgads82 wrote: »
    Anecdotal, I've always found peppermint tea good for cramps, but I'd rather not have it up my rear.

    Coffee enema or GTFO!

    You don't want to know how many people have advised this to cure my chronic illness. Ok its 3 but that's 3 too many.

    No way :o And they meant it for real?!?!? Holy buckets!
  • auddiiauddii Posts: 15,410Member Member Posts: 15,410Member Member
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.
  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Posts: 2,272Member Member Posts: 2,272Member Member
    auddii wrote: »
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.



    Right, which is why I said it's only in theory. There is nothing scientific I have been able to find to support that claim.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    Jason did you really think peppermint oil soaked all the way though your skin into your guts? Or did I read that wrong?
    I don't know all of the science behind it, but its ability to make me shaky/nauseous (when using too much) suggests to me that the oil went far enough below the skin surface.
  • DaisyHamiltonDaisyHamilton Posts: 576Member Member Posts: 576Member Member
    I have mint for hair growth (though I don't use enough to see results even if it DID work, which I don't know if it does or not), tea tree oil for skin issues (discoloration, breaking out, bumps, cuts, etc) which works 100% of the time, and a lavender-infused bath oil because it helps my husband sleep better (diagnosed insomnia).

    But honestly I'm a total skeptic. I'd try more if someone I knew and trusted had opinions on them.
  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Posts: 2,272Member Member Posts: 2,272Member Member
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    giphy.gif

    Again, that is why I said it is only in "theory". I'm not stating that is how it works, but that seems to be what Forecaster seems to be trying to state.
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