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INTERMITTENT FASTING - A LIFESTYLE MAKEOVER

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Replies

  • ChristinaOne21
    ChristinaOne21 Posts: 49 Member
    Here I am! Thank you for those private messages that came into my inbox as it has reminded me that tuning in here each day is the way to keep accountable to myself. IF has become a daily part of my lifestyle - not every day but the majority of the week. Just over three weeks to go until our wedding and unfortunately I haven't got anywhere near my goal - life kind of got in the way and a few things fell by the wayside. However I am feeling pretty happy in my own skin despite not achieving all my goals. I think the main thing I need to get back on track is having the evening meals earlier and not too much and the right things - a big meal in the evening makes me more hungry the next morning - especially if it isn't balanced - whereas smaller portions and a better mix of protein, veges and good carbs earlier in the evening means I can happily not eat for another 16 hours.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 37,799 MFP Moderator

    Nope. That's mumbo jumbo.

    If you eat 1300 calories spread out over 10 meals or only eat 1300 calories in one meal a day you'll burn the same amount of fat.

    I do not believe that statement to be true. The only thing I can agree with is that if you consume 1300 calories at once or over time, you will have consumed 1,300 calories. It's how your body REACTS to consuming 1,300 calories that matters. Most people will lose weight on 1,300 calories/day, even without exercise, if they are very overweight, regardless of the method used. However, for those of us who are INSULIN RESISTANT or have METABOLIC SYNDROME, fasting is very different from calorie restriction. In addition to following Dr. Jason Fung (search for him on YouTube), I have queried several endocrinologists within the health system that I work in, and all agree that intermittent fasting (fasting begins after 12 hours of not eating) boosts your metabolism/energy and fat burning to the maximum.

    I have a friend who is calorie counting (1,200 calories per day) and one who is doing IF (1,200) calories per day. Both started January 1st of this year. The person who is calorie counting has lost 8 lbs, the one who is doing IF has lost 15 lbs (almost double). Both are women in mid-life.

    Does Fung have any studies that hold macros and calories constant to back his claims? Most of what i have seen from his is largely anecdotal or based on preliminary research.

    There is some research to suggest there might be a small increase in metabolism and increase insulin sensitivity.
  • GaleHawkins
    GaleHawkins Posts: 8,160 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Nope. That's mumbo jumbo.

    If you eat 1300 calories spread out over 10 meals or only eat 1300 calories in one meal a day you'll burn the same amount of fat.

    I do not believe that statement to be true. The only thing I can agree with is that if you consume 1300 calories at once or over time, you will have consumed 1,300 calories. It's how your body REACTS to consuming 1,300 calories that matters. Most people will lose weight on 1,300 calories/day, even without exercise, if they are very overweight, regardless of the method used. However, for those of us who are INSULIN RESISTANT or have METABOLIC SYNDROME, fasting is very different from calorie restriction. In addition to following Dr. Jason Fung (search for him on YouTube), I have queried several endocrinologists within the health system that I work in, and all agree that intermittent fasting (fasting begins after 12 hours of not eating) boosts your metabolism/energy and fat burning to the maximum.

    I have a friend who is calorie counting (1,200 calories per day) and one who is doing IF (1,200) calories per day. Both started January 1st of this year. The person who is calorie counting has lost 8 lbs, the one who is doing IF has lost 15 lbs (almost double). Both are women in mid-life.

    Does Fung have any studies that hold macros and calories constant to back his claims? Most of what i have seen from his is largely anecdotal or based on preliminary research.

    There is some research to suggest there might be a small increase in metabolism and increase insulin sensitivity.

    @psuLemon that is interesting about the increased insulin sensitivity. When I was googling the term I found the below supplement that claims to increase insulin sensitivity as well plus a host of other things.

    lifeextension.com/magazine/2014/5/how-lipoic-acid-preserves-critical-mitochondrial-function/page-02?p=1
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 37,799 MFP Moderator
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Nope. That's mumbo jumbo.

    If you eat 1300 calories spread out over 10 meals or only eat 1300 calories in one meal a day you'll burn the same amount of fat.

    I do not believe that statement to be true. The only thing I can agree with is that if you consume 1300 calories at once or over time, you will have consumed 1,300 calories. It's how your body REACTS to consuming 1,300 calories that matters. Most people will lose weight on 1,300 calories/day, even without exercise, if they are very overweight, regardless of the method used. However, for those of us who are INSULIN RESISTANT or have METABOLIC SYNDROME, fasting is very different from calorie restriction. In addition to following Dr. Jason Fung (search for him on YouTube), I have queried several endocrinologists within the health system that I work in, and all agree that intermittent fasting (fasting begins after 12 hours of not eating) boosts your metabolism/energy and fat burning to the maximum.

    I have a friend who is calorie counting (1,200 calories per day) and one who is doing IF (1,200) calories per day. Both started January 1st of this year. The person who is calorie counting has lost 8 lbs, the one who is doing IF has lost 15 lbs (almost double). Both are women in mid-life.

    Does Fung have any studies that hold macros and calories constant to back his claims? Most of what i have seen from his is largely anecdotal or based on preliminary research.

    There is some research to suggest there might be a small increase in metabolism and increase insulin sensitivity.

    @psuLemon that is interesting about the increased insulin sensitivity. When I was googling the term I found the below supplement that claims to increase insulin sensitivity as well plus a host of other things.

    lifeextension.com/magazine/2014/5/how-lipoic-acid-preserves-critical-mitochondrial-function/page-02?p=1

    You should consider this as well. As usual its overhyped in humans.

    https://examine.com/supplements/conjugated-linoleic-acid/
  • GaleHawkins
    GaleHawkins Posts: 8,160 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Nope. That's mumbo jumbo.

    If you eat 1300 calories spread out over 10 meals or only eat 1300 calories in one meal a day you'll burn the same amount of fat.

    I do not believe that statement to be true. The only thing I can agree with is that if you consume 1300 calories at once or over time, you will have consumed 1,300 calories. It's how your body REACTS to consuming 1,300 calories that matters. Most people will lose weight on 1,300 calories/day, even without exercise, if they are very overweight, regardless of the method used. However, for those of us who are INSULIN RESISTANT or have METABOLIC SYNDROME, fasting is very different from calorie restriction. In addition to following Dr. Jason Fung (search for him on YouTube), I have queried several endocrinologists within the health system that I work in, and all agree that intermittent fasting (fasting begins after 12 hours of not eating) boosts your metabolism/energy and fat burning to the maximum.

    I have a friend who is calorie counting (1,200 calories per day) and one who is doing IF (1,200) calories per day. Both started January 1st of this year. The person who is calorie counting has lost 8 lbs, the one who is doing IF has lost 15 lbs (almost double). Both are women in mid-life.

    Does Fung have any studies that hold macros and calories constant to back his claims? Most of what i have seen from his is largely anecdotal or based on preliminary research.

    There is some research to suggest there might be a small increase in metabolism and increase insulin sensitivity.

    @psuLemon that is interesting about the increased insulin sensitivity. When I was googling the term I found the below supplement that claims to increase insulin sensitivity as well plus a host of other things.

    lifeextension.com/magazine/2014/5/how-lipoic-acid-preserves-critical-mitochondrial-function/page-02?p=1

    You should consider this as well. As usual its overhyped in humans.

    https://examine.com/supplements/conjugated-linoleic-acid/

    Thanks I will take look after my testing of Poly MVA after I burn through my 1/2 gallon supply .
  • DeeDiddyGee
    DeeDiddyGee Posts: 601 Member
    edited March 2017

    Does Fung have any studies that hold macros and calories constant to back his claims? Most of what i have seen from his is largely anecdotal or based on preliminary research.

    There is some research to suggest there might be a small increase in metabolism and increase insulin

    I am witnessing firsthand accounts where A1C has improved significantly as well as moderate weight loss, results they couldn't get from straight calorie counting. I picked 16:8 after reading tons of articles and books by Fung, Valardy, etc.

  • DeeDiddyGee
    DeeDiddyGee Posts: 601 Member
    What I love about is although I am eating the same number of calories like before, the only difference is that during the fed state (the eating window), eating all those calories in a short amount of time makes me feel like I am bulking when in reality, I am eating the same freaking thing as before, but in a shorter time frame.

    YES!
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 37,799 MFP Moderator

    Does Fung have any studies that hold macros and calories constant to back his claims? Most of what i have seen from his is largely anecdotal or based on preliminary research.

    There is some research to suggest there might be a small increase in metabolism and increase insulin

    I am witnessing firsthand accounts where A1C has improved significantly as well as moderate weight loss, results they couldn't get from straight calorie counting. I picked 16:8 after reading tons of articles and books by Fung, Valardy, etc.

    N=1 is great for personal experience but there are a lot of factors that could of driven the results. Carb restriction, fasting, weight loss, etc...

    To suggest someome is wrong, would suggest there is evidence to back it up. The studies i have seen support thr number of meals and timing is largely unimportant. I have also seen a large amount of studies supporting low carb as beneficial for those with IR.

    But that does not mean, that IF is superior (outside of personal preference). If your eating pattern allowed it, if you held calories and protein the same, that weight loss could have driven the same result. Its possible that if you also subsequently restricted carbs, it could have been the factor.

    The fact is, your body will take longer to break down larger amounts of calories. So that is why I asked if you had science to back it. So Evengi is correct (which he is a PhD in biology IIRC).

    Keep in mind that compliance and adherence to a diet strategy is first and foremost the most important factor. But ones experience does not negate what science tells us.
  • DeeDiddyGee
    DeeDiddyGee Posts: 601 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Does Fung have any studies that hold macros and calories constant to back his claims? Most of what i have seen from his is largely anecdotal or based on preliminary research.

    There is some research to suggest there might be a small increase in metabolism and increase insulin

    I am witnessing firsthand accounts where A1C has improved significantly as well as moderate weight loss, results they couldn't get from straight calorie counting. I picked 16:8 after reading tons of articles and books by Fung, Valardy, etc.

    N=1 is great for personal experience but there are a lot of factors that could of driven the results. Carb restriction, fasting, weight loss, etc...

    To suggest someome is wrong, would suggest there is evidence to back it up. The studies i have seen support thr number of meals and timing is largely unimportant. I have also seen a large amount of studies supporting low carb as beneficial for those with IR.

    But that does not mean, that IF is superior (outside of personal preference). If your eating pattern allowed it, if you held calories and protein the same, that weight loss could have driven the same result. Its possible that if you also subsequently restricted carbs, it could have been the factor.

    The fact is, your body will take longer to break down larger amounts of calories. So that is why I asked if you had science to back it. So Evengi is correct (which he is a PhD in biology IIRC).

    Keep in mind that compliance and adherence to a diet strategy is first and foremost the most important factor. But ones experience does not negate what science tells us.


    I do not believe IF to be superior -- I believe it to work for me, where all other programs (too many to name) were too loose and I failed (due to MY not being able to adhere). This is something I can follow...and because my meals are condensed into a small window, I feel satsified, even though eating the same things when calorie-counting. Without IF, I wouldn't know about the timing, that again works for me. Let's be friends, okay? :)
  • jacqulinka
    jacqulinka Posts: 4 Member
    I have just stumbled upon this IF idea and while I'm not doing anything else but watching calories, I have realised on an average day I fast about 15 hrs between meals. I generally eat dinner around 530pm and eat breakfast after dropping my kids off at school around 9-930am. This is just normal for me and I'm wondering if its still IF or does my sleep state not count as effective as fasting until 3pm and eating late at night? I do not snack at all after dinner, a habit a taught myself a few years ago. I do not really see any bonus in terms of weightloss. I only lose weight if I keep my calories under my maintenance level.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,321 Member
    jacqulinka wrote: »
    I have just stumbled upon this IF idea and while I'm not doing anything else but watching calories, I have realised on an average day I fast about 15 hrs between meals. I generally eat dinner around 530pm and eat breakfast after dropping my kids off at school around 9-930am. This is just normal for me and I'm wondering if its still IF or does my sleep state not count as effective as fasting until 3pm and eating late at night? I do not snack at all after dinner, a habit a taught myself a few years ago. I do not really see any bonus in terms of weightloss. I only lose weight if I keep my calories under my maintenance level.

    If you are already doing fasts it may not be as effective for you as it is for some people. I generally rarely eat after 6 pm out of habit and sometimes I skip breakfast (breakfast being at around 11 am). I'm already generally eating within an 8 hour window or shorter and I have done it when I was morbidly obese too, that's my normal. Your eating schedule appears to be within an 8 hour window so you're effectively intermittent fasting naturally.

    Windowed eating is basically meant to condense calories within just a few hours so you get to eat what you feel is a large quantity of food which helps some people feel more satisfied. Hunger before starting to eat is less extreme and more tolerable than hunger between meals for many people and if you are already a lifetime intermittent faster like I am there is hardly any hunger before the first meal. If you are already having larger fewer meals it wouldn't help your hunger unless you take in all of your calories within one meal or something, which may not be practical. That's why I turned my attention to the kind of intermittent fasting that severely restricts calories on some days to achieve the same result of feeling like I'm eating pleasantly satisfying quantities on non-fast days.