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How to ACTUALLY boil an egg that peels

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  • TonyB0588TonyB0588 Member Posts: 9,521 Member Member Posts: 9,521 Member
    @suzyjmcd2 Amazing!! But it's so strange the many contradictory theories on this subject. You're starting in cold water. The one I'm trying this week is suggesting putting the cold egg into already boiling water.
  • urloved33urloved33 Member Posts: 3,361 Member Member Posts: 3,361 Member
    egg in pot of water. cover. bring to rolling boil. turn on low. let sit in that for 11 minutes. perfect hard boiled eggs/
  • bgorman65bgorman65 Member Posts: 28 Member Member Posts: 28 Member
    I adapt the method J. Kenji Lopez-Alt (from Cooks Illustrated and now Serious Eats website) prescribes: boil water, then put eggs cold from the fridge into the water - gently! Reduce the water to a high simmer (it bubbles but the bubbles don't break the surface, even though they may move it) and for hard-cooked leave for 15 minutes (it might work better at 14 or even 13 because sometimes my yolks start to smell a bit sulphur-y) then plunge immediately into a large bowl of ice and water and leave at least 5 minutes, or put bowl, ice water and all into the fridge until you're ready to use them that day or the next day. He says the shock of the ice-water is what forces the egg to contract and pull away from the membrane that keeps us from peeling them cleanly. Sometimes I also crack the large end a little as soon as they are cold enough to handle, and this reduces that divot.
    NOTES: Hard-cooked eggs do not last as long as fresh/raw ones so use them that day or the next day. Kenji also advises that older eggs seem to work better, but with this method even fresh eggs usually peel cleanly. When I'm ready to use them I hit them on the counter large end first, then small end, then lightly all over. Then I roll the egg between my hands both around the equator and from the ends. At this point they're practically peeling themselves.
  • crabbybriannacrabbybrianna Member Posts: 344 Member Member Posts: 344 Member
    I think all of these methods work… and sometimes they don’t work. I’ve had 2 eggs from the same carton, cooked together in the same pot, for the same amount of time, and one peels nicely, and the other doesn’t. I have tried all different ways to boil eggs, and putting them in already boiling water and then into cold water when finished cooking has always worked the best, but again, occasionally it doesn’t.
  • nuklh3d1nuklh3d1 Member Posts: 12 Member Member Posts: 12 Member
    Adding my 2 cents. I make 2-4 hard boiled eggs a day. I boil mine for 13-15 minutes, drain, and immediately rinse under cold water until completely cooled. This works with fresh or store bought eggs. Occasionally I will have 1 of a dozen hard to peel but that's rarely.
  • LounmounLounmoun Member Posts: 8,428 Member Member Posts: 8,428 Member
    I think all of these methods work… and sometimes they don’t work. I’ve had 2 eggs from the same carton, cooked together in the same pot, for the same amount of time, and one peels nicely, and the other doesn’t. I have tried all different ways to boil eggs, and putting them in already boiling water and then into cold water when finished cooking has always worked the best, but again, occasionally it doesn’t.

    I cook my eggs the same was every time and never really have trouble peeling them nicely. Seriously surprised it is so hard for other people to find a method that works for them. Maybe my tap water is special- hard water higher in nitrates. It'd be nice to hear it was beneficial for something.


  • combsshancombsshan Member Posts: 49 Member Member Posts: 49 Member
    jseams1234 wrote: »
    The secret is to use older eggs. The fresher the egg the harder to peel they are. This is why it's so hit or miss with most methods. ;)

    Yep. I usually don't have trouble getting supermarket eggs to peel because by the time you buy them they are already a week or two old. However, when I buy fresh eggs from a lady at church who has hens, I almost always have trouble getting them to peel. I have found that putting about a tbsp of oil in the water when boiling seems to help. I read that the shell/membrane actually soak up the oil and that is what makes them peel easier. This does not affect the taste.
  • crabbybriannacrabbybrianna Member Posts: 344 Member Member Posts: 344 Member
    Lounmoun wrote: »
    I think all of these methods work… and sometimes they don’t work. I’ve had 2 eggs from the same carton, cooked together in the same pot, for the same amount of time, and one peels nicely, and the other doesn’t. I have tried all different ways to boil eggs, and putting them in already boiling water and then into cold water when finished cooking has always worked the best, but again, occasionally it doesn’t.

    I cook my eggs the same was every time and never really have trouble peeling them nicely. Seriously surprised it is so hard for other people to find a method that works for them. Maybe my tap water is special- hard water higher in nitrates. It'd be nice to hear it was beneficial for something.


    Could be, but I have hard water as well and sometimes they just don’t want to peel. I’d say 90% of the time mine peel with no problems, but the other 10% I have to scoop them out with a spoon or I’ll just end up mangling the egg. I have no idea why!
  • Crafty_camper123Crafty_camper123 Member Posts: 1,440 Member Member Posts: 1,440 Member
    I truly believe it just has to do with the age of the egg. Older eggs shrink back from the membrane and peel better then new eggs. So if you have two eggs from the same carton that peel better then the other, chances are one egg is newer then the other. So if you want easy peel eggs, just wait two weeks after buying from the store. If they are farm fresh, the wait is probably closer to 3 or 4 weeks before they start to get easier.
  • suzyjmcd2suzyjmcd2 Member Posts: 263 Member Member Posts: 263 Member
    TonyB0588 - I know - so many different methods. But after years of trying different things, I like this way the best. Potatoes are also supposed to be boiled starting in cold water - cooks them more evenly.
  • ValeriePlzValeriePlz Member Posts: 524 Member Member Posts: 524 Member
    It is all about the age of the egg, as others have said!
  • TonyB0588TonyB0588 Member Posts: 9,521 Member Member Posts: 9,521 Member
    I truly believe it just has to do with the age of the egg. Older eggs shrink back from the membrane and peel better then new eggs. So if you have two eggs from the same carton that peel better then the other, chances are one egg is newer then the other. So if you want easy peel eggs, just wait two weeks after buying from the store. If they are farm fresh, the wait is probably closer to 3 or 4 weeks before they start to get easier.

    Interesting thought, but we don't buy eggs to keep for a few weeks before using.
  • cjv73cjv73 Member Posts: 263 Member Member Posts: 263 Member
    Read a blog that was very useful. This guy tried every method and did the results. His conclusions -- eggs age didn't matter at all. That's a myth.

    Sorry, but as a chicken farmer, I very strongly dispute this. There is absolutely no question that the fresher our eggs, the harder they are to peel.
  • TonyB0588TonyB0588 Member Posts: 9,521 Member Member Posts: 9,521 Member
    cjv73 wrote: »
    Read a blog that was very useful. This guy tried every method and did the results. His conclusions -- eggs age didn't matter at all. That's a myth.

    Sorry, but as a chicken farmer, I very strongly dispute this. There is absolutely no question that the fresher our eggs, the harder they are to peel.

    Hello "farmer", perhaps you can change their diet to affect the results. That would be deserving of a medal or trophy of some sort.
  • cjv73cjv73 Member Posts: 263 Member Member Posts: 263 Member
    Not sure why the quotation marks, but at various times over the years they have eaten steady diets of corn, or layer feed, or free range, and so far it hasn't seemed to affect the peeling.
  • CrosbiniumCrosbinium Member Posts: 417 Member Member Posts: 417 Member
    I use my instant pot. Bring to pressure for 4 mins. Let sit for 6 before doing a quick release. Easy to peel eggs - even if the eggs are fresh!
  • Crafty_camper123Crafty_camper123 Member Posts: 1,440 Member Member Posts: 1,440 Member
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    I truly believe it just has to do with the age of the egg. Older eggs shrink back from the membrane and peel better then new eggs. So if you have two eggs from the same carton that peel better then the other, chances are one egg is newer then the other. So if you want easy peel eggs, just wait two weeks after buying from the store. If they are farm fresh, the wait is probably closer to 3 or 4 weeks before they start to get easier.

    Interesting thought, but we don't buy eggs to keep for a few weeks before using.

    Neither do we, but with a household of 2, it takes a while to get through them sometimes, lol.
  • whosshewhosshe Member Posts: 597 Member Member Posts: 597 Member
    Book idea.

    100 different ways to peel eggs perfectly followed by pictures of people failing to peel eggs perfectly using all the different methods

    What is this sorcery
  • suzyjmcd2suzyjmcd2 Member Posts: 263 Member Member Posts: 263 Member
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