"Help! I'm eating HEALTHY but not losing weight!"

Options
2

Replies

  • ncfitbit
    ncfitbit Posts: 1,058 Member
    Options
    I like it. Thanks, @toxikon. From a "filthy" IIFYM eater who believes CICO always applies... ;)

    I like you!
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,719 Member
    Options
    Sunna_W wrote: »
    Too many calories; it's about Calories In and Calories out. Try limiting your calories to 1500 a day. Don't eat back your calories either...

    Another thing to consider is changing the types of foods you are eating.

    Example of my typical week day meals:

    Breakfast: 2 HB eggs and 100 g of cold boiled organic potatoes (source of resistant starch) with sea salt and ground pepper (243 calories)

    Lunch: 8 oz Trader Joe's 8 veggie chopped salad with raw apple cider vinegar and 3 oz of organic chicken or turkey breast (170 calories)

    Snack: 1.5 oz EPIC bar (Savory high protein snack with grass fed meat, fruit, and nuts) (120 to 200 calories)

    Dinner: 4 to 6 oz of lean meat, cooked green veggie (green beans, kale, spinach, rocket, bok choy), cooked squash (pumpkin, butternut) or sweet potato, or mixed veggies (like mushrooms, peppers, onions); sometimes fresh spaghetti sauce (24 oz tomatoes, some onion and butter, spices) mixed with HALF a serving of pasta per person that is cooked and then dumped in to soak up the sauce - this reduces the carbs but because the pasta soaks up the sauce no one will really notice. I do something similar with noodles in goulash or rice in a stir fry. Per serving most of my dinner meals are 600 to 700 calories.

    Hope this helps. :)

    Wow. Did you even read the first post? :huh:

    That's got to be a new record.

    i was literally just going to ask @Sunna_W where the normal low carb rant was when i saw the edit :laugh:
  • toxikon
    toxikon Posts: 2,383 Member
    Options
    Sunna_W wrote: »
    Obviously I didn't... LOL

    On autopilot today, eh? I forgive you, it's Friday.
  • jjpptt2
    jjpptt2 Posts: 5,650 Member
    Options
    toxikon wrote: »
    Sunna_W wrote: »
    Obviously I didn't... LOL

    On autopilot today, eh? I forgive you, it's Friday.

    Since I pointed my car key at my office door this morning, and pushed the "unlock" button, I'll also forgive and forget. :laugh:

    lmao
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited February 2018
    Options
    toxikon wrote: »
    Bread is clean?

    Or flavoured Chobani? Or light Italian dressing? :D

    You don't think a person new to weight loss would look at the above food items and consider them fairly healthy? Especially if they're coming from a formerly junk food predominant diet?

    I think that might be a "I'm eating healthy and low cal" from some people who don't count calories, sure. I don't think that's what people mean by "I'm eating clean" but it actually sheds a lot of light for me on why people who use "clean" to mean basically "pretty healthy" or "food I think is good diet food" claim to be eating "clean" or even "all non processed" when eating lots of processed stuff in reality.

    I think it's a good message, so sorry to go off on this tangent; just found it interesting.
  • ladyhusker39
    ladyhusker39 Posts: 1,406 Member
    Options
    Bread is clean?

    It all depends on who you ask. "Clean" doesn't really have a definition.
  • bambusa
    bambusa Posts: 6 Member
    Options
    Can someone reply with their definition of clean eating?

    7567305.png
  • mmapags
    mmapags Posts: 8,934 Member
    Options
    bambusa wrote: »
    Can someone reply with their definition of clean eating?

    7567305.png

    As has been stated, there isn't a universally accepted one. Thus rendering it a meaningless term. It means whatever the person using it thinks it means.
  • WinoGelato
    WinoGelato Posts: 13,454 Member
    Options
    Sounds like the original post, at least the title may have been edited because I'm not seeing the hot button word "clean" in either the infographic or the OP's post/title. I also think, and I'm assuming here, that OP knows that "clean" is a subjective, mostly meaningless term and that's why the post was changed.

    At any rate - I got the point and I think it's a helpful one to share - even if it is nothing new. People may believe that the type of foods they are eating guarantees weight loss - but at the end of the day - if too many calories are consumed, they will not lose.

    Looking forward to seeing where this thread goes - it is a Friday after all!
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Options
    toxikon wrote: »
    toxikon wrote: »
    toxikon wrote: »
    Bread is clean?

    Or flavoured Chobani? Or light Italian dressing? :D

    You don't think a person new to weight loss would look at the above food items and consider them fairly healthy? Especially if they're coming from a formerly junk food predominant diet?

    You said clean.

    Clean, healthy, tomato, tomato (pronounce them differently in your head...)

    I apologize for not using the proper nomenclature. :D I hope the message and intent of the image is clear enough for newbies to understand!

    Tough crowd today.

    Eating clean is not the same as eating healthy. They are completely different!

    Anywho...if that was a regular diet, I wouldn't consider it particularly healthy or clean.

    I think the image is fairly tongue-in-cheek. I've seen it on the forum a million times. Tons of new people think flavored yogurt is healthy, whole wheat is inherently healthier than white, sugary protein/granola bars are healthy, etc. All those dieting myths. The image is meant to portray a new person who has fallen for the myths of what is considered "clean/healthy" eating and is baffled by their lack of weight loss. Hope that clears it up.

    I don't see anything in the list that is not healthy. But as noted above clean and healthy aren't the same things.

    That actually is why I think focusing on overall diet is more significant than individual food items. I'm sure people might think they were eating well because each food item was "healthy" in their minds, but really there's not very many vegetables, it probably doesn't even meet the low US recommendation. So to me that wouldn't be a particularly healthful diet if that day reflected most days.

    (If it was just one day of a week and the others had more veg, of course, fine.)

    I do agree that the post usefully makes the point that you can pick only things you consider healthy and still exceed calories and even gain.
  • WinoGelato
    WinoGelato Posts: 13,454 Member
    Options
    bambusa wrote: »
    Can someone reply with their definition of clean eating?

    7567305.png

    It means something different to almost everyone who tries to practice it which is why it is an unhelpful term to describe the way one eats - and why it gets so much discussion on these boards.

    @diannethegeek had a great list of all the different ways to define it - oh, here it is.

    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10337480/what-is-clean-eating/p1

    As you can see, that's hardly a helpful way to talk about one's diet (noun).

  • French_Peasant
    French_Peasant Posts: 1,639 Member
    Options
    Great post Toxicon!

    I am going through the same thing with my father in law. I am not sure what all foods he has even cut out, but it includes filthy dirty bread and grains, dairy, sugar, and now filthy dirty beans, peanuts, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, squashes, and whatever other evil "lectin" foods are out there (per flavor-of-the-month guru Gundry), and is frustrated because he can't lose. He was on estrogen therapy a few months ago, and that is really having an impact on his weight; it is surely very difficult for a former Marine and athletic star who has always been fit and muscular to deal with.

    He was talking about how he was always having peanut butter every day and how the lectins were causing him not to lose weight through inflammation or some such. I asked him how much peanut butter he was eating: "just a little with my apple." I held up a tiny 2-ounce container (we were at Red Robin...not sure how that fits into the diet, but he gets the lettuce buns) and said, "this is 400 calories." You could see the surprise and the lightbulb going on, but he just dismissed it because he had thrown all his peanut butter away the previous day anyway.

    I try to get him to calculate his calories (it would not be hard for him with his limited foods) but no, that is too hard, he could never do that. Better/easier to cut out entire families of foods including really important prebiotics like whole grains and legumes.

    I don't argue with his too much about it, but it just makes me sad to see him cutting out things he enjoys and should have no issue eating. I told him once the weather got better and he was back out on the golf course, things would be getting better. He plays golf almost every day and walks the course.
  • toxikon
    toxikon Posts: 2,383 Member
    Options
    Great post Toxicon!

    I am going through the same thing with my father in law. I am not sure what all foods he has even cut out, but it includes filthy dirty bread and grains, dairy, sugar, and now filthy dirty beans, peanuts, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, squashes, and whatever other evil "lectin" foods are out there (per flavor-of-the-month guru Gundry), and is frustrated because he can't lose. He was on estrogen therapy a few months ago, and that is really having an impact on his weight; it is surely very difficult for a former Marine and athletic star who has always been fit and muscular to deal with.

    He was talking about how he was always having peanut butter every day and how the lectins were causing him not to lose weight through inflammation or some such. I asked him how much peanut butter he was eating: "just a little with my apple." I held up a tiny 2-ounce container (we were at Red Robin...not sure how that fits into the diet, but he gets the lettuce buns) and said, "this is 400 calories." You could see the surprise and the lightbulb going on, but he just dismissed it because he had thrown all his peanut butter away the previous day anyway.

    I try to get him to calculate his calories (it would not be hard for him with his limited foods) but no, that is too hard, he could never do that. Better/easier to cut out entire families of foods including really important prebiotics like whole grains and legumes.

    I don't argue with his too much about it, but it just makes me sad to see him cutting out things he enjoys and should have no issue eating. I told him once the weather got better and he was back out on the golf course, things would be getting better. He plays golf almost every day and walks the course.

    Yeah, a lot of my friends have fallen into this trap. It can be very hard to convince them to just count their damn calories. It's funny how our brains work like that. Restricting foods (or entire food groups) = perfectly reasonable! Counting calories = worst thing ever.