Do you plan on counting calories your whole life in order to maintain?

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Replies

  • BitofaState
    BitofaState Posts: 75 Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    It would be interesting to see the results of a controlled study of people who reach their goal weight and maintain it by logging daily for at least 6 months to a year, who then are divided into groups of those who continue to log daily and those who don't log at all over the following year.

    The hypothesis to be tested would be whether those who continue to log daily are able to maintain their weight better than those who don't.

    My guess is that those who continue to log would, as a group, be better able to do so than those who don't.

    Any sports Phd or Master's candidates out their who could use this as a thesis topic?

    ;)

    There is a resource that tracks successful losers and maintainers and looks for strategies that help maintain losses.

    http://www.nwcr.ws/

    If you are older than 18 years and have maintained a loss of >30lbs for a year then you can join the registry and become part of the study.

    The common behaviors are a focus on a low fat diet (>25% of calories from fats), a monitoring of food consumption, maintaining higher levels of activity and monitoring body weight on a regular basis.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9665679?dopt=Abstract
  • KANGOOJUMPS
    KANGOOJUMPS Posts: 6,477 Member
    NOPE, never have done it once and do not own a scale
  • HappyGrape
    HappyGrape Posts: 436 Member
    Yes, I do.
  • inertiastrength
    inertiastrength Posts: 2,344 Member
    No but I suspect I may have to
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    It would be interesting to see the results of a controlled study of people who reach their goal weight and maintain it by logging daily for at least 6 months to a year, who then are divided into groups of those who continue to log daily and those who don't log at all over the following year.

    The hypothesis to be tested would be whether those who continue to log daily are able to maintain their weight better than those who don't.

    My guess is that those who continue to log would, as a group, be better able to do so than those who don't.

    Any sports Phd or Master's candidates out their who could use this as a thesis topic?

    ;)

    There is a resource that tracks successful losers and maintainers and looks for strategies that help maintain losses.

    http://www.nwcr.ws/

    If you are older than 18 years and have maintained a loss of >30lbs for a year then you can join the registry and become part of the study.

    The common behaviors are a focus on a low fat diet (>25% of calories from fats), a monitoring of food consumption, maintaining higher levels of activity and monitoring body weight on a regular basis.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9665679?dopt=Abstract

    I'm a participant of the NWCR study. They send you surveys every year or so to see where you stand and what your habits are. It's a survey, so there are a lot of yes/no and multiple choice questions. *They* chose the focus for the survey. I find the survey is overly fixated on fat consumption, among other things. For example, on the last one, there was a question about if you decrease the butter/oil you use while baking. NO! That would give me dry shi**y muffins. However, I *do* often decrease the amount of sugar I use (this was not an option, they were only asking about oil). There are very few questions, if any at all, that concern logging.

    They do give you the option to write some additional comments at the end of the survey, and I always end up writing a book. I do wonder if anyone ever reads it!

    This is one of the reasons I started being active in these forums. I have read their research papers, but actually listening to one of the subjects adds a new dimension to it! Thanks for the comment. I would love to add you as a friend if I could.
  • brittyn3
    brittyn3 Posts: 481 Member
    I need the structure. The times I've stopped logging is when I've gained weight back. It's not that I don't know what a healthy amount of food is, it's just easier to have that extra slice of pizza or extra helping of dinner if you don't log it. I tend to eat the same things for lunch and same rotation of dinners anyways - I don't suspect it'll be that challenging.

    When I feel like logging is the last thing I want to do for the day, I don't do it. I think everyone will find their own happy medium that allows them to maintain their own success. It all just boils down to the process that works for you.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,304 Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    It would be interesting to see the results of a controlled study of people who reach their goal weight and maintain it by logging daily for at least 6 months to a year, who then are divided into groups of those who continue to log daily and those who don't log at all over the following year.

    The hypothesis to be tested would be whether those who continue to log daily are able to maintain their weight better than those who don't.

    My guess is that those who continue to log would, as a group, be better able to do so than those who don't.

    Any sports Phd or Master's candidates out their who could use this as a thesis topic?

    ;)

    I also wonder what the difference would be for someone who's had weight issues most of their life vs someone who didn't.

    I've been pretty lean most of my life...I was never more than 10-12% BF until after I turned 30. My issue really wasn't food compulsions or anything like that...I graduated university at 30 and went from being a very active person to working 12 hours per day behind a desk and put on 40-50 Lbs over the course of about 8 years.

    I don't find managing my weight to be particularly difficult and I don't put a ton of thought into it...my biggest thing I think is maintaining a good activity level like I used to. I do eat a bit better in terms of getting my veggies in and whatnot as well...but I really think keeping my activity level up is what has made maintenance pretty easy.

    It might be different if I was trying to maintain a super lean physique at my current age as well...10-12% used to be very easy in my 20s...I'm good with around 15% in my 40s.
  • abirdintherain
    abirdintherain Posts: 73 Member
    I maintained for about a year and a half without counting calories, just let myself go off track a little too long and need an extra boost to get this weight back off (20 pounds gained back, after 140 lost). It's a tool and instills good habits and knowledge for the long run. Sometimes it's good to take a few days to log to make sure you're still on track. I keep watch on my weight and could typically lower my weight back down to normal when I'd get ~5 pounds up, but I struggled with some depression and let it go too long, so now I need to get back to where I was and knowing how much I need to eat there, then I should be able to keep it up without logging again. It's all personal, though, and what works for one person in maintenance won't work for another.
  • nxd10
    nxd10 Posts: 4,571 Member
    Yes. It's been six years. I use it to keep track not to limit myself.
  • MySweetLavinia
    MySweetLavinia Posts: 90 Member
    I do naturally eat (and desire) way less food than I used to, but yes, I'll probably count forever. There are also certain foods I've cut out of my life for good because I can't mentally moderate myself with them, which helps prevent backsliding. I actually find tracking kind of satisfying and fun to do now. It's part of my self-care routine so I enjoy it!
  • BitofaState
    BitofaState Posts: 75 Member

    I'm a participant of the NWCR study. They send you surveys every year or so to see where you stand and what your habits are. It's a survey, so there are a lot of yes/no and multiple choice questions. *They* chose the focus for the survey. I find the survey is overly fixated on fat consumption, among other things. For example, on the last one, there was a question about if you decrease the butter/oil you use while baking. NO! That would give me dry shi**y muffins. However, I *do* often decrease the amount of sugar I use (this was not an option, they were only asking about oil). There are very few questions, if any at all, that concern logging.

    They do give you the option to write some additional comments at the end of the survey, and I always end up writing a book. I do wonder if anyone ever reads it!

    Thanks for that, much better to get a participant's view.

    I would suspect that one of the researchers is looking beyond initial findings if they're doing a deeper dive into fat consumption. Coding an open study with a large participant group study is time consuming so you do sometimes need to force fit your data into categories.

    Hopefully they will survey for sugar consumption at some point as it would be interesting to see the strategies for the "pure, white and deadly" substance.
  • beerfoamy
    beerfoamy Posts: 1,523 Member
    It's part of my self-care routine so I enjoy it!

    This really resonated with me and is why I think I will still track and log everything when I reach my goals. :)

  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,974 Member
    I'm a participant of the NWCR study. They send you surveys every year or so to see where you stand and what your habits are.

    Thanks for the link to the study group. Just signed up.