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Stopped doing squats.

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24

Replies

  • flippy1234
    flippy1234 Posts: 686 Member
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    Squats are awesome. My favorite thing for getting great legs and glutes.
  • SonyaCele
    SonyaCele Posts: 2,841 Member
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    squats, when done properly are a full body compound movement with many benefits. do them if you want or dont do them if you dont want.
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,261 Member
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    lorrpb wrote: »
    aggelikik wrote: »
    Most people in this world go on about their daily lives not doing squats, so in general yes, it is ok, no one ever died because of lack of squats. The question is what are you trying to achieve, and what your overall routine looks like. For me, doing for years a traditional large muscle teams routine, adjusting to a routine of no squats on drs orders (serious ankle injury and bearing any weight is off limits forever) has been extremely challenging and after two years I am still not happy with any alternative.

    Disagree with bolded part. The average person will die if they can’t squat. If you can’t squat, you cannot live independently, will end up in a nursing home. The inability to squat is usually tied to overall health decline and loss of function. There are exceptions to this for disabled people who have adapted well, but even so they will have a shorter life span.
    No, you won’t die tomorrow or even next year for most, but squatting is the most important exercise for maintaining functioning. Young people won’t get it, but anyone over 50 will. Maybe I should put this in Debate forum.

    To add to this, for most people around the globe, a squat is a position of repose. Because we mainly sit on furniture here in the west, we are generally unable to squat. We have the ability when we're children to squat restfully but we lose it over time because we don't keep at it. We are not built for sitting on furniture and it is actually quite terrible for our bodies!

    Squatting is a good measure of overall health and fitness. One should be able to squat comfortably with their feet flat on the ground well into their advanced years, like this old Asian lady:

    vsviw292nvrx.jpg

    Or this old Asian dude:

    nftk4zdxh3ji.jpg


    Considering that the OP was talking about squatting for building strength, I have to assume that @aggelikik is talking about squats for exercise, not the basic squatting movement. Yes, it's important to be mobile even into old age. Even weight bearing exercise is great to keep up with in old age. But no body is going to die if they do lunges or step ups instead of squats.
  • Priyanka2883
    Priyanka2883 Posts: 34 Member
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    flippy1234 wrote: »
    Squats are awesome. My favorite thing for getting great legs and glutes.

    That kind of suggestion I want.
  • Priyanka2883
    Priyanka2883 Posts: 34 Member
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    Any use in building my leg strength.

    What weight did you squat? How often were you squatting?

    5 to 7.5 kg dumbles and alternate says. 3 rep of 12.
  • sardelsa
    sardelsa Posts: 9,812 Member
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    What kind of results were you expecting in less than two weeks though?
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,719 Member
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    Any use in building my leg strength.

    What weight did you squat? How often were you squatting?

    5 to 7.5 kg dumbles and alternate says. 3 rep of 12.

    And in what way wasn't it working?
  • Priyanka2883
    Priyanka2883 Posts: 34 Member
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    sardelsa wrote: »
    What kind of results were you expecting in less than two weeks though?

    I think u didnt get the question correctly.i stopped doing it for 12 days .earlier it was i think 4 months that i have been practising it.
    But for now i got my answer.thanks for the reply.
  • Priyanka2883
    Priyanka2883 Posts: 34 Member
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    My query is solved guys thanks for your reponse.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,633 Member
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    Always increase the weight, otherwise you don't build your legs. If you only have small dumbbells then look for advanced bodyweight squats, like one legged and pistols. Make it more difficult for you!
  • LKArgh
    LKArgh Posts: 5,179 Member
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    lorrpb wrote: »
    aggelikik wrote: »
    Most people in this world go on about their daily lives not doing squats, so in general yes, it is ok, no one ever died because of lack of squats. The question is what are you trying to achieve, and what your overall routine looks like. For me, doing for years a traditional large muscle teams routine, adjusting to a routine of no squats on drs orders (serious ankle injury and bearing any weight is off limits forever) has been extremely challenging and after two years I am still not happy with any alternative.

    Disagree with bolded part. The average person will die if they can’t squat. If you can’t squat, you cannot live independently, will end up in a nursing home. The inability to squat is usually tied to overall health decline and loss of function. There are exceptions to this for disabled people who have adapted well, but even so they will have a shorter life span.
    No, you won’t die tomorrow or even next year for most, but squatting is the most important exercise for maintaining functioning. Young people won’t get it, but anyone over 50 will. Maybe I should put this in Debate forum.

    I am pretty sure you deliberately pretend to misunderstand :)
  • born_of_fire74
    born_of_fire74 Posts: 776 Member
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    jemhh wrote: »
    lorrpb wrote: »
    aggelikik wrote: »
    Most people in this world go on about their daily lives not doing squats, so in general yes, it is ok, no one ever died because of lack of squats. The question is what are you trying to achieve, and what your overall routine looks like. For me, doing for years a traditional large muscle teams routine, adjusting to a routine of no squats on drs orders (serious ankle injury and bearing any weight is off limits forever) has been extremely challenging and after two years I am still not happy with any alternative.

    Disagree with bolded part. The average person will die if they can’t squat. If you can’t squat, you cannot live independently, will end up in a nursing home. The inability to squat is usually tied to overall health decline and loss of function. There are exceptions to this for disabled people who have adapted well, but even so they will have a shorter life span.
    No, you won’t die tomorrow or even next year for most, but squatting is the most important exercise for maintaining functioning. Young people won’t get it, but anyone over 50 will. Maybe I should put this in Debate forum.

    To add to this, for most people around the globe, a squat is a position of repose. Because we mainly sit on furniture here in the west, we are generally unable to squat. We have the ability when we're children to squat restfully but we lose it over time because we don't keep at it. We are not built for sitting on furniture and it is actually quite terrible for our bodies!

    Squatting is a good measure of overall health and fitness. One should be able to squat comfortably with their feet flat on the ground well into their advanced years, like this old Asian lady:

    vsviw292nvrx.jpg

    Or this old Asian dude:

    nftk4zdxh3ji.jpg


    Considering that the OP was talking about squatting for building strength, I have to assume that @aggelikik is talking about squats for exercise, not the basic squatting movement. Yes, it's important to be mobile even into old age. Even weight bearing exercise is great to keep up with in old age. But no body is going to die if they do lunges or step ups instead of squats.

    I’m not sure how you propose to separate the two as the range of motion is required whether you do them weighted or unweighted. That’s like saying I quit walking and it’s fine because I have no plans to race walk.
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
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    I know I need to update my profile picture first off. Lol I recently switch off squats to a leg press hip thrust combo. I am not into power lifting, so I figured I don't need squats. Besides, my form is horrid at best. I found I was putting unneeded stress on knees and hips. As a person who walks a lot, I want to protect my legs at all cost.
  • Priyanka2883
    Priyanka2883 Posts: 34 Member
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    psychod787 wrote: »
    I know I need to update my profile picture first off. Lol I recently switch off squats to a leg press hip thrust combo. I am not into power lifting, so I figured I don't need squats. Besides, my form is horrid at best. I found I was putting unneeded stress on knees and hips. As a person who walks a lot, I want to protect my legs at all cost.

    Thank you so much for your reply.
    Thats what I meant.
    I have no clue why others were being rude.
    You are such a sweetheart.
  • jjpptt2
    jjpptt2 Posts: 5,650 Member
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    psychod787 wrote: »
    I know I need to update my profile picture first off. Lol I recently switch off squats to a leg press hip thrust combo. I am not into power lifting, so I figured I don't need squats. Besides, my form is horrid at best. I found I was putting unneeded stress on knees and hips. As a person who walks a lot, I want to protect my legs at all cost.

    Thank you so much for your reply.
    Thats what I meant.
    I have no clue why others were being rude.
    You are such a sweetheart.

    Most people aren't being rude - you just asked a poor/incomplete/unclear question... one that is virtually impossible to answer, never mind actually offer any help/advice in regards to. Thus all the follow-up questions.