Do people ever criticize the way you choose to eat?

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Replies

  • debrag12
    debrag12 Posts: 1,064 Member
    Not on here no, but I commented on someones post on IG on how she was sticking to her macro while at a bar by bringing her own food and drink with her, not a horrible comment by the way. Someone replied to me staying I couldn't talk with all the crap food I'd posted on my IG, one post of avocado toast with poached egg, another a chicken salad and one my couscous & chicken prepped for work, I don't see how they are 'bad'. I rarely post food photos, maybe they were commenting on the alcohol lol
  • ruqayyahsmum
    ruqayyahsmum Posts: 1,495 Member
    My husband does, but only because I do the cooking and occasionally like to try new things, or include things that you may not find on the McDonald's menu, and he hopes that by complaining he'll never have to eat tofu/fish/orange vegetables again. I pretty much ignore him and carry on with what I want to do. If he wants to eat something different, he's welcome to cook it himself.
    My kids are also shocked and horrified when I eat things like sushi, or try to force them to eat non-deep fried foods, but again I'm quite happy to ignore them. Although they don't have the option of cooking for themselves, they either shut up and eat it, or starve.

    We have that rule in my family
    I call it the take it or leave it rule

    I have a friend who baffles me. The kids actually do like the same stuff as each other but will always demand different dinners so she cooks 4 different meals a night. The kids are 15,13 and 11

    She complains often so I just smile and say that must be hard on you
  • New_Heavens_Earth
    New_Heavens_Earth Posts: 610 Member
    My husband does, but only because I do the cooking and occasionally like to try new things, or include things that you may not find on the McDonald's menu, and he hopes that by complaining he'll never have to eat tofu/fish/orange vegetables again. I pretty much ignore him and carry on with what I want to do. If he wants to eat something different, he's welcome to cook it himself.
    My kids are also shocked and horrified when I eat things like sushi, or try to force them to eat non-deep fried foods, but again I'm quite happy to ignore them. Although they don't have the option of cooking for themselves, they either shut up and eat it, or starve.

    We have that rule in my family
    I call it the take it or leave it rule

    I have a friend who baffles me. The kids actually do like the same stuff as each other but will always demand different dinners so she cooks 4 different meals a night. The kids are 15,13 and 11

    She complains often so I just smile and say that must be hard on you

    That will never ever take place in my home.
    People who don't want to eat what's available are on their own. Eggs and toast was the dinnner of the week because no one wanted what I cooked or could offer a good suggestion besides KFC.
  • mmnv79
    mmnv79 Posts: 538 Member
    You mean there are people out there who don't criticize other people's food choices???

    Exactly. I don't normally eat yogurt, but the other day I got a low fat one. I bought it because of its flavour, mango. One of my colleges, who barely know me and ironically is unfit and looks like twenty years older than she is, told me 'you shouldn't be eating low fat yogurts because they are full of sugar' and kept going on and on about how sugar turns into calories if not burned, etc. But she always telling other people that they are eating too much, etc. even when they are healthy and fit. We barely know each other there, as we only meet for a few minutes break. Therefore she hasn't got a clue if someone has a second job or works out in the gym, is a runner, etc.
  • Deviette
    Deviette Posts: 978 Member
    My husband does, but only because I do the cooking and occasionally like to try new things, or include things that you may not find on the McDonald's menu, and he hopes that by complaining he'll never have to eat tofu/fish/orange vegetables again. I pretty much ignore him and carry on with what I want to do. If he wants to eat something different, he's welcome to cook it himself.
    My kids are also shocked and horrified when I eat things like sushi, or try to force them to eat non-deep fried foods, but again I'm quite happy to ignore them. Although they don't have the option of cooking for themselves, they either shut up and eat it, or starve.

    We have that rule in my family
    I call it the take it or leave it rule

    I have a friend who baffles me. The kids actually do like the same stuff as each other but will always demand different dinners so she cooks 4 different meals a night. The kids are 15,13 and 11

    She complains often so I just smile and say that must be hard on you

    That will never ever take place in my home.
    People who don't want to eat what's available are on their own. Eggs and toast was the dinnner of the week because no one wanted what I cooked or could offer a good suggestion besides KFC.

    My parent's option was bread and cheese. We either ate what we were given or there was bread and cheese. This also extended to friends. I once had two friends over who took them up on this and made themselves bread and cheese instead of quiche. Was actually less effort for my parents as they didn't have to cook extra for my friends.
  • mmnv79
    mmnv79 Posts: 538 Member

    We have that rule in my family
    I call it the take it or leave it rule

    I have a friend who baffles me. The kids actually do like the same stuff as each other but will always demand different dinners so she cooks 4 different meals a night. The kids are 15,13 and 11

    She complains often so I just smile and say that must be hard on you

    That's the way I've been brought up, take it or leave it. A friend of mines does the same as your friend. One day she looked very tired and when I asked her if she was OK. She told me she wakes up at 5am every day to cook different meals for each family member (husband and two daughters aged 17 and 21) and walk one of her daughter's dogs, when my friend doesn't start working until 9am.
  • Bry_Fitness70
    Bry_Fitness70 Posts: 2,484 Member
    edited September 2018
    People make assumptions about how I eat in a sort of passive-aggressively critical way. For example, we all went out to a work luncheon a few weeks ago and I ordered a cheeseburger and fries and several people remarked: "I thought you were into health food since you exercise so much". Right, to be fit you have to exist entirely on kale, chia seeds, and organic coconut water...
  • Deviette
    Deviette Posts: 978 Member
    People make assumptions about how I eat in a sort of passive-aggressively critical way. For example, we all went out to a work luncheon a few weeks ago and I ordered a cheeseburger and fries and several people remarked: "I thought you were into health food since you exercise so much". Right, to be fit you have to exist entirely on kale, chia seeds, and organic coconut water...

    I hope you said that to them :wink:
  • DisneyDude85
    DisneyDude85 Posts: 427 Member
    Only from my vegan fiancee when I eat meat. It keeps things spicy :D
  • rfreitas1848
    rfreitas1848 Posts: 176 Member
    Yup all the time. I get teased for turning down fries and going for the baked potato instead.
  • MystikPixie
    MystikPixie Posts: 342 Member

    We have that rule in my family
    I call it the take it or leave it rule

    I have a friend who baffles me. The kids actually do like the same stuff as each other but will always demand different dinners so she cooks 4 different meals a night. The kids are 15,13 and 11

    She complains often so I just smile and say that must be hard on you

    I've seen parents that do that even now and it baffles me. We were lucky to get the one meal, no way were we ever going to get multiples because of being fussy. Honestly I am a better adult because of that, I truly believe that giving children everything they want whenever is wrong.
  • ccrdragon
    ccrdragon Posts: 3,248 Member
    The rule when I was growing up was that you had to at least try everything that was served for dinner. You didn't have to eat it, you didn't have to like it, but you at least had to try it. If you didn't like it, there was always sandwich stuff in the fridge.
  • DisneyDude85
    DisneyDude85 Posts: 427 Member
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    The rule when I was growing up was that you had to at least try everything that was served for dinner. You didn't have to eat it, you didn't have to like it, but you at least had to try it. If you didn't like it, there was always sandwich stuff in the fridge.

    wait... you had a second option if you didnt like it?


    Lucky.
  • Yep, im plant based and healthier than ive ever been so what people say does not bother me
  • Lillymoo01
    Lillymoo01 Posts: 2,868 Member
    My husband does, but only because I do the cooking and occasionally like to try new things, or include things that you may not find on the McDonald's menu, and he hopes that by complaining he'll never have to eat tofu/fish/orange vegetables again. I pretty much ignore him and carry on with what I want to do. If he wants to eat something different, he's welcome to cook it himself.
    My kids are also shocked and horrified when I eat things like sushi, or try to force them to eat non-deep fried foods, but again I'm quite happy to ignore them. Although they don't have the option of cooking for themselves, they either shut up and eat it, or starve.

    We have that rule in my family
    I call it the take it or leave it rule

    I have a friend who baffles me. The kids actually do like the same stuff as each other but will always demand different dinners so she cooks 4 different meals a night. The kids are 15,13 and 11

    She complains often so I just smile and say that must be hard on you

    That will never ever take place in my home.
    People who don't want to eat what's available are on their own. Eggs and toast was the dinnner of the week because no one wanted what I cooked or could offer a good suggestion besides KFC.

    Yep. That's how I learned to cook comfortably. (By which I mean that I'd been capable of doing it for a number of years before I had to, but I generally didn't and got intimidated by various instructions. Like "separate eggs" or "beat whites until foamy". Or "whisk flour slowly into sauce until liquid reduces by half.") I went vegetarian at 19. Mom was already making two menus because she preferred chicken to red meat and my dad was the opposite. I had two sisters who, growing up were allergic to many things. One was actually allergic to chicken and turkey. Cooked tomatoes were okay, but raw ones caused hives. Neither could have fish in any form. So, mom made beef for Dad and youngest sis, chicken for the rest of us, and spent a lot of time looking for recipes for salads, soups, etc., that everyone could eat.

    So, when I announced I was going veg, her reaction was, "I'm not making a third menu. You eat what I make or you cook for yourself." I did. And still do. And on the plus side, growing up thinking two menus were normal meant I had no issue when I married a meat-eater. One veg entree for me, one meat entree for him, and we come together on salads/sides/etc. I think I became a much more confident cook much earlier than I would have if I'd waited until I moved out.

    I've had to deal with food allergies with my daughter too which meant very few meals would suit all members. I never have totally separate items though. I just adapt to make alterations along the way. eg if making tuna mornay I would make one lot of the white sauce with milk and another with soy milk. If making a shepherds pie I'd have a small one on the side that didn't have cheese. If making lasagna I'd put some of the meat aside and make a spag bog with it that was dairy free. It was a little bit of extra work but worth it if it meant I could still have dairy and nuts in my meals.
    I still do it now, but I am also making my meals more calorie friendly while serving up what they enjoy. To make zoodles or cauliflower rice for me and pasta and rice for them is no big deal so everyone is happy.
  • mgalsf12
    mgalsf12 Posts: 329 Member
    No. They usually say, 'wow you eat so healthy', and then proceed to tell me that they need to eat better and that they need to drop weight. I lead by example, not by my words.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,033 Member
    All the time. Especially as a trainer by other "fitness" nuts. I have NO RESTRICTIONS on food other than just making sure I reach my macros and stay within a reasonable calorie restriction.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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