60 yrs and up

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Replies

  • ridiculous59
    ridiculous59 Posts: 2,658 Member
    edited January 9
    @kmcintosh1988 I have a couple of things that work for me with regards to evening "snack-attacks"....

    Firstly, for me, snacking in the evening is usually the result of bordom. If I don't have an outside committment, or anything good to watch or read, I end up drifting towards the kitchen. But if I have a good book on the go, or am invested in a good tv series on Netflix or BritBox, then I'm usually okay.

    I often save 100 calories for an evening snack but I also have a drawer of nice teas that are my evening "treat", if I feel like I need something.

    Something else I used to do was stretching in the evening. I won't call it yoga because to me yoga is more of a complete mind/body thing. But as I was watching TV, I'd pull out my mat and stretch for an hour or so. At that time in my weightloss journey I had started exercising more and would get terrible leg and foot cramps during the night. The evening stretching really helped and also kept me occupied so I wasn't thinking about food.

    In the lighter, summer months, an evening walk is always a good option. But I find I don't walk in the evening during the darker, winter months.

    So yeah, for me, if I don't save a few calories for an evening snack then I need to keep my mind and/or body engaged to keep me out of the kitchen. Or have a cup of tea.
  • Pdc654
    Pdc654 Posts: 279 Member
    Welcome to all the new posters here. You will find a lot of support and excellent advice here.
  • BartBVanBockstaele
    BartBVanBockstaele Posts: 623 Member
    edited January 9
    Pdc654 wrote: »
    Today my trainer at the gym asked me to come speak to her weight loss support group next Thursday. She said having someone my age come talk to them about how I lost 100 pounds would be so motivational to them. She said some in the group just don't believe they can do it and they are younger than me. I was going to do it for nothing, but then she told me they would pay me with a free addional training session! Woohoo!
    It is indeed astonishing that the claim that major weight loss cannot be achieved is still being made and believed. One would think that there is more than enough freely available and easily accessible credible information to know that this is just wrong.
  • ridiculous59
    ridiculous59 Posts: 2,658 Member
    Pdc654 wrote: »
    Today my trainer at the gym asked me to come speak to her weight loss support group next Thursday. She said having someone my age come talk to them about how I lost 100 pounds would be so motivational to them. She said some in the group just don't believe they can do it and they are younger than me. I was going to do it for nothing, but then she told me they would pay me with a free addional training session! Woohoo!

    Congratulations!!!
  • deb234moa
    deb234moa Posts: 3 Member
    Good for you! That's a great perk! Well deserved it sounds like.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 28,209 Member
    Good Evening everyone. I’m Kathy. 61 years old. I’ll be 62 in August.
    So happy to have found a group in my age group. Night time is my worse enemy. I do good all day long then night comes and I turn into a snack monster! Sweets and salty are what I crave. Food has always been my friend when a emotion would hit me. I need to remember food is for fuel and not a friend. I really need to listen to my head too. Am I really hungry? I’m trying to answer that question more recently before grabbing anything. Looking forward to growing in this group. But not in size.

    Hi, @kmcintosh1988 - and welcome to you and the other new participants!

    That was a great post from @ridiculous59 about snacking, and I agree 100%. A couple of other thoughts about evening snackiness:

    For me, experimenting with my other meals (timing/nutrient distribution) helped reduce evening cravings. The specific solutions tend to differ person by person, but for me what made a huge difference was getting a solid breakfast with plenty of protein, then more protein distributed through the day. I know, it seems bizarre that breakfast so strongly affects my evening cravings, but it turned out to be true, for me.

    If you think about it, one possible trigger of evening cravings is fatigue: Appetite is an energy-seeking behavior, y'know? That could be behind my personal finding that breakfast is key (solid energy that holds up through the day), but it also can open other possibilities to consider: Can your sleep quality/quantity be improved? Are there sources of stress in your life that you could reduce/manage, since stress can increase fatigue? Is there any chance that you're exercising too intensely for current fitness level, or cutting calories too far? And so forth.

    I'm more of a salty-snacks person than a sweet-snacks one (especially if I make it a point to eat enough fruit through the day!). There are some great low-calorie salty snacks: Pickles (not just cucumber, but other types) and sauerkraut are a couple of examples. I also gave some thought to finding snacks that satisfy the desire for sweets or salt, but that bring along enough nutrition to be worth their calorie cost. Tastes are individual, but reduced-fat string cheese, salted hard-boiled egg, crispy chickpeas, prunes, whole fruit are some examples that work for me.

    You can do this: Best wishes!

  • NewGrl64
    NewGrl64 Posts: 110 Member
    Hello all. I'm new here and just wanted to touch base with some over 60s folks.

    My doctor told me I have prediabetes and metabolic syndrome and wants me to lose weight. I lost 16 lbs. myself by cutting out processed foods and adding more vegetables to my meals, but I seem to be stalled there. He wants me to try a LCHF diet because he says it will help, but didn't really give me any info on how to do that. He told me to "google" it.

    If anyone can suggest any good websites with good solid info, I would appreciate it. It seems so many of them have conflicting information. Some say the LCHF is the Holy Grail and others say it's dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. I'm not sure what to think.

    Thanks in advance for any help you can give.
  • BartBVanBockstaele
    BartBVanBockstaele Posts: 623 Member
    edited January 12
    NewGrl64 wrote: »
    Hello all. I'm new here and just wanted to touch base with some over 60s folks.

    My doctor told me I have prediabetes and metabolic syndrome and wants me to lose weight. I lost 16 lbs. myself by cutting out processed foods and adding more vegetables to my meals, but I seem to be stalled there. He wants me to try a LCHF diet because he says it will help, but didn't really give me any info on how to do that. He told me to "google" it.

    If anyone can suggest any good websites with good solid info, I would appreciate it. It seems so many of them have conflicting information. Some say the LCHF is the Holy Grail and others say it's dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. I'm not sure what to think.

    Thanks in advance for any help you can give.
    The trouble with low carb high fat is that it can mean very different things to many people. In the end, it is all about energy balance. Ingest less than you need and you are guaranteed to lose fat, ingest more and you will almost certainly gain fat. Anything else may or may not have an effect, but the effect will be marginal and it will be useless if energy in is not lower than energy out.

    That said: there are people in which less carbohydrate and perhaps a little more fat, leaves people less hungry and makes it less difficult to keep an energy deficit.

    As LCHF being dangerous and avoided at all cost, it depends: a little less carbohydrate and a little more fat will do absolutely nothing to endanger you. However, excluding carbohydrate and increasing fat intake a lot is dangerous, and one of the dangers is a false sense of security, because if you maintain an energy deficit, almost all risk markers will go down in the beginning. The price you'll have to pay comes later, occasionally when it is too late.

    Since we are all different, we all respond at least somewhat differently to different dieting methods. Again, the only things that really matters, is an energy deficit. In my case, my diet is lowER carb and lowER fat, while providing adequate protein. I have lost over 60 kg so far, and was encouraged today to keep it up for at least another 4 months. It works... for me, there is no guarantee that it works for anyone else. Your best bet is to start with a somewhat balanced diet (somewhat, because it is actually unbalanced since it has to be lowER in energy). If you can not hold out on that, try another approach. LCHF might work HCLF might work... all diets that give you an energy deficit WILL work, you have to find one that is compatible with your lifestyle and preferences, and no one can do that for you. But again, the one thing you MUST have, is an energy deficit.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 8,922 Member
    edited January 12
    NewGrl64 wrote: »
    Hello all. I'm new here and just wanted to touch base with some over 60s folks.

    My doctor told me I have prediabetes and metabolic syndrome and wants me to lose weight. I lost 16 lbs. myself by cutting out processed foods and adding more vegetables to my meals, but I seem to be stalled there. He wants me to try a LCHF diet because he says it will help, but didn't really give me any info on how to do that. He told me to "google" it.

    If anyone can suggest any good websites with good solid info, I would appreciate it. It seems so many of them have conflicting information. Some say the LCHF is the Holy Grail and others say it's dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. I'm not sure what to think.

    Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

    I've been low carb for over 12 years and yeah, it's not dangerous. Low carb is anywhere from 5% carbs to 40% and that would be up to you. I would suggest you transition slowly. Removing ultra and processed foods like you have is the foundation of low carb with a lot of vegetables and if you decide to include starches, use whole foods like beans, legumes, whole grains like barley, brown rice, millet that kind of thing and it's probably a good idea to reduce tubers which can spike insulin pretty well. Really the key for this diet is a decent amount of protein 1.6g's at least and the fats can fill in the rest, but make sure you include fatty fish for essential fatty acids, the omega 3's. It's pretty simple and it's well accepted for your condition. Try not to complicate it. Good luck. Try google scholar and use low carb and diabetes, there's lots to read. Cheers.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 28,209 Member
    NewGrl64 wrote: »
    Hello all. I'm new here and just wanted to touch base with some over 60s folks.

    My doctor told me I have prediabetes and metabolic syndrome and wants me to lose weight. I lost 16 lbs. myself by cutting out processed foods and adding more vegetables to my meals, but I seem to be stalled there. He wants me to try a LCHF diet because he says it will help, but didn't really give me any info on how to do that. He told me to "google" it.

    If anyone can suggest any good websites with good solid info, I would appreciate it. It seems so many of them have conflicting information. Some say the LCHF is the Holy Grail and others say it's dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. I'm not sure what to think.

    Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

    I've been low carb for over 12 years and yeah, it's not dangerous. Low carb is anywhere from 5% carbs to 40% and that would be up to you. I would suggest you transition slowly. Removing ultra and processed foods like you have is the foundation of low carb with a lot of vegetables and if you decide to include starches, use whole foods like beans, legumes, whole grains like barley, brown rice, millet that kind of thing and it's probably a good idea to reduce tubers which can spike insulin pretty well. Really the key for this diet is a decent amount of protein 1.6g's at least and the fats can fill in the rest, but make sure you include fatty fish for essential fatty acids, the omega 3's. It's pretty simple and it's well accepted for your condition. Try not to complicate it. Good luck. Try google scholar and use low carb and diabetes, there's lots to read. Cheers.

    I agree about needing a decent amount of protein, but thinking you might clarify your recommendation here, i.e., 1.6g per . . . kg of current weight? kg of goal weight? kg of lean mass? Or per pound of one of those? Presumably, that's daily.

    Personally, I've used a rough rule of thumb of minimum 0.6-0.8g protein daily per pound of healthy goal weight (which is in the neighborhood of .8-1g per pound of lean body mass for many people), but I don't know what weight units you use, and there's quite a range of values for protein that different people recommend.

    Thanks for clarifying!
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 8,922 Member
    edited January 12
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    NewGrl64 wrote: »
    Hello all. I'm new here and just wanted to touch base with some over 60s folks.

    My doctor told me I have prediabetes and metabolic syndrome and wants me to lose weight. I lost 16 lbs. myself by cutting out processed foods and adding more vegetables to my meals, but I seem to be stalled there. He wants me to try a LCHF diet because he says it will help, but didn't really give me any info on how to do that. He told me to "google" it.

    If anyone can suggest any good websites with good solid info, I would appreciate it. It seems so many of them have conflicting information. Some say the LCHF is the Holy Grail and others say it's dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. I'm not sure what to think.

    Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

    I've been low carb for over 12 years and yeah, it's not dangerous. Low carb is anywhere from 5% carbs to 40% and that would be up to you. I would suggest you transition slowly. Removing ultra and processed foods like you have is the foundation of low carb with a lot of vegetables and if you decide to include starches, use whole foods like beans, legumes, whole grains like barley, brown rice, millet that kind of thing and it's probably a good idea to reduce tubers which can spike insulin pretty well. Really the key for this diet is a decent amount of protein 1.6g's at least and the fats can fill in the rest, but make sure you include fatty fish for essential fatty acids, the omega 3's. It's pretty simple and it's well accepted for your condition. Try not to complicate it. Good luck. Try google scholar and use low carb and diabetes, there's lots to read. Cheers.

    I agree about needing a decent amount of protein, but thinking you might clarify your recommendation here, i.e., 1.6g per . . . kg of current weight? kg of goal weight? kg of lean mass? Or per pound of one of those? Presumably, that's daily.

    Personally, I've used a rough rule of thumb of minimum 0.6-0.8g protein daily per pound of healthy goal weight (which is in the neighborhood of .8-1g per pound of lean body mass for many people), but I don't know what weight units you use, and there's quite a range of values for protein that different people recommend.

    Thanks for clarifying!

    Sure, yeah, that's 1.6g per kilogram for reference or goal weight. Personally I'm just over 2g's, and yes that would be per day. Just to add: there's just so much nuance when it comes to protein but for the context of this conversation I'll leave it there. Cheers.
  • BCLadybug888
    BCLadybug888 Posts: 886 Member
    Hi @NewGrl64, you have probably heard of the Atkins diet plan? That is quite low carb, with lots of books and resources readily available.

    If you reduce your carbs, you need to eat something, so protein & fats take up the slack.

    To reduce carbs for a plan like Atkins, you pretty much remove or drastically reduce all starches like pasta, rice & potatoes, plus of course no baked goods unless very high fibre to offset the carbs (which is where net carbs come in - Atkins explains all that).

    Atkins was the precursor of the whole Keto movement, and is indeed a form of Keto.

    The Glycemic Index is another useful guide, as high GI foods are also high carb foods.

    MFP blogs and recipes also feature LCHP information, but not very LC lol.

    Take your time shifting your diet away from carbs and enjoy whatever food you do eat - like others have mentioned, you just need a calorie deficit to lose weight. 😉
  • NewGrl64
    NewGrl64 Posts: 110 Member
    Thanks so much to everyone who answered my post asking for help with LCHF. I googled LCHF, Atkins, and Keto and there were TONS of sites and info available. A lot of sites kept referring back to dietdoctor.com, so I just decided to settle in there. I'm going to start with the low carb info and recipes and then decide if I need to proceed to Keto. Keto seems very restrictive, but that's just coming from a rice, potatoes, and pasta perspective. LOL
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 8,922 Member
    edited January 12
    NewGrl64 wrote: »
    Thanks so much to everyone who answered my post asking for help with LCHF. I googled LCHF, Atkins, and Keto and there were TONS of sites and info available. A lot of sites kept referring back to dietdoctor.com, so I just decided to settle in there. I'm going to start with the low carb info and recipes and then decide if I need to proceed to Keto. Keto seems very restrictive, but that's just coming from a rice, potatoes, and pasta perspective. LOL

    Yes diet doctor is a decent site. Keto is petty restrictive and I suggest you transition down slowly not to be totally discouraged. There are more than 1 type of ketogenic diet so it's important that you become familiar with them all to design one that might suit you better. Even 20% from carbs will work effectively, and if you feel going lower from a lack of progress, is warranted, then you could more easily, it's not a race. Cheers.
  • ridiculous59
    ridiculous59 Posts: 2,658 Member
    @NewGrl64 My husband has type 2 diabetes and in order to not have to increase his medication, he opted to eat a lower carb diet. It's quite amazing the difference its made to his numbers. I knew it would, but to actually see the results is entirely different. He had been losing weight (and he's not a big guy to start with) so by controlling his blood sugar more effectively he's managed to put on some weight. Which in his case, is a good thing.

    In other words, whether you choose lower carb, low carb, Atkins, or keto, just be aware that your total calories still has an effect on your weight. Low carb doesn't mean "free of calories".

    Also, you haven't mentioned exercise at all. Exercise affects our blood sugars too. Our bodies were built to move so by adding in some exercise, you may see a difference in your numbers.

    But most of all, congratulations for being proactive with your health 🙂
  • BartBVanBockstaele
    BartBVanBockstaele Posts: 623 Member
    @NewGrl64 My husband has type 2 diabetes and in order to not have to increase his medication, he opted to eat a lower carb diet. It's quite amazing the difference its made to his numbers. I knew it would, but to actually see the results is entirely different. He had been losing weight (and he's not a big guy to start with) so by controlling his blood sugar more effectively he's managed to put on some weight. Which in his case, is a good thing.

    In other words, whether you choose lower carb, low carb, Atkins, or keto, just be aware that your total calories still has an effect on your weight. Low carb doesn't mean "free of calories".

    Also, you haven't mentioned exercise at all. Exercise affects our blood sugars too. Our bodies were built to move so by adding in some exercise, you may see a difference in your numbers.

    But most of all, congratulations for being proactive with your health 🙂
    I second that. I would add that going for a walk after eating, will help with sugar levels as well, because the sugar is used to feed your muscles. As a result, your sugar levels will not rise as high.
  • swimmom_1
    swimmom_1 Posts: 1,302 Member
    My name is Mary, 65 from Pennsylvania.
    Did my Elliptical 120 minutes straight through this AM!!! 8.5 miles. Getting back up to my long sessions. Maybe I wasn't out of Cardiovascular endurance, as I thought. The previous sessions I wore a short sleeve shirt instead of a tank top as I did today again. (It's chilly in my basement.) Even though I had a fan on, maybe I just got to warm, which wore me down.