Myfitnesspal

Message Boards Food and Nutrition
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

For the love of Produce...

1103104105106108

Replies

  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member, Premium Posts: 5,359 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,359 Member
    I still had pea and lentil soup and some canary beans, but the black beans I started soaking the other day were sprouting.

    So I cooked them. That's all good and well, and there were a whole LOT of them. I thought to myself, "Self; when's the last time you made black bean soup?" I answered, "Self, I have no freakin' idea."

    So I let the pot cool, transferred everything to a giant bowl, washed the pot, and started sauteing onions, celery, and garlic. I pureed some of the beans, and mixed everything back together and let it simmer another half hour or so. I pureed a little more of what was left, and let it cool enough to containerize and refrigerate.

    I will have a nice lunch! And soup all weekend. Maybe I'll send a picture, but it just looks like mortar. It's pretty tasty even though it's less spicy than normal. I just tossed a couple chiles de Arbol in when I was cooking the beans.
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Member, Premium Posts: 978 Member Member, Premium Posts: 978 Member
    Hi friends! I've been stalking this thread for a bit. I'm trying to think... I don't *think* I've ever met a vegetable I didn't like, though not wild about radishes, and the only fruit I won't eat so far is durian. Mom swears that when I was a toddler riding in the shopping cart I lunged to grab vegetables instead of candy! I'm a pretty adventurous eater but there are a lot of things I've seen people mention on here that I've never tried. Living in a place with 6+ months of winter kind of limits the selection lol. But I recently discovered a locally-owned store dedicated entirely to produce so I'm excited to see what I might find there!

    Anyways... just wanted to say hi and introduce myself a bit 🙂

    Inspiring!
  • chris89topherchris89topher Member Posts: 283 Member Member Posts: 283 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    Pretty boring.

    Roasted broccoli.
    injh7n51fr73.jpg

    I am still waiting for the replacement glass for my oven door to come in to the shop. I decided to go ahead and get the convection going anyway. I am trying to avoid any splatters on the glass that will be in the middle of two other plates once the new one arrives. I don't know why I haven't been roasting as many vegetables this winter. They sure are good. I guess it's because I keep making soup, beans, and bean soup. I'm just one person, and I can only eat so much food. SO. MUCH. FOOD!

    Roasted veggies are awesome, and I love broccoli crispy like that. It's perfect! You nailed it.
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member, Premium Posts: 5,359 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,359 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    Pretty boring.

    Roasted broccoli.
    injh7n51fr73.jpg

    I am still waiting for the replacement glass for my oven door to come in to the shop. I decided to go ahead and get the convection going anyway. I am trying to avoid any splatters on the glass that will be in the middle of two other plates once the new one arrives. I don't know why I haven't been roasting as many vegetables this winter. They sure are good. I guess it's because I keep making soup, beans, and bean soup. I'm just one person, and I can only eat so much food. SO. MUCH. FOOD!

    Roasted veggies are awesome, and I love broccoli crispy like that. It's perfect! You nailed it.

    Oh it was cooked right for sure, and I had it in the fridge long enough it was time to cook it. Just nothing special. I guess that's ok. It doesn't always have to be special! Today I might roast a sweet potato or two. . I think I have some purple potatoes in the fridge too that I should get after. They crisp up really nicely I also like to make thick slices of yellow onions and roast them on their own. So tasty. Next time I buy produce, I think I'll get beets or cauliflower. And I can't wait until I get the oven door fixed.

    I decided my carrot sauerkraut was fermented enough yesterday after about 25 days. I packed it into smaller jars including one pint jar that some neighbors dropped off last week with some home-made gumbo. They got it back full of kraut. It was their choice; they already have kimchi in the fridge. I'm not sure I like the kraut with the carrot. It's also kind of Franenkraut. I had some garlicky sauerkraut that was only fermented two weeks that I added to this batch after it fermented a while because I thought there were too many carrots. I do like that it's nice and sour and not too salty. I think the next batch will just be cabbage again, or if it has anything else, I'll add it after a couple weeks of ferment and let it go through a shorter ferment.

    The last batch of kimchi is REALLY good.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member, Premium Posts: 6,744 Member Member, Premium Posts: 6,744 Member
    I used to use cooked endive a lot, but I'd normally chop it and sautee with other veg. Kind of how I've been using radicchio lately.

    Yesterday's dinner produce was pretty simple again: sauteed green beans (side dish with rockfish, which I topped with lemon and artichoke hearts), plus a big salad with romaine, chopped kale, cucumbers, green peppers, and cherry tomatoes.
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member, Premium Posts: 5,359 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,359 Member
    Mushroom Barley Vegetable Miso Soup.

    This dish can be modified to suit your needs or desires. It also can make use of what vegetables you happen to have. I have used potatoes, but don't do that anymore. The barley is hearty enough, I save the potatoes for some other use. When I have parsnips, they go good. Carrots are a little sweeter and add color. Be aware: I love mushrooms and garlic. Adjust amounts to suit your needs.

    I am fortunate that I collect wild mushrooms. If I have more than I can eat right away, I prep them and lightly saute and then freeze and vacuum seal. I can pull out a litte bag and add it to anything I want that deep delicious wild mushroom flavor. I usually add some "grocery store mushrooms" to help fill it out. The batch I just made used a mix of white and brown (cremini) mushrooms. Note that white button mushrooms, cremini mushrooms, and portobello mushrooms are all the same species, Agaricus bisporus. I call 'em "Grocery Store Mushrooms." You can also add shiitake, but they will need longer cooking or be cut smaller. If you can afford (or find) porcini.... yum.

    A note on barley. You can use pearled barley; I don't. Perled barley has not just the hull removed, but it's polished to remove some or all of the bran. Hulled (de-hulled) barley is a more whole grain. I also like the flavor. Lately I've been using what's known as semi-hulled barley. It's a variety called Blue Streaker that was bred in the 1970s to be easy for the hull to fall off. Remember the 1970s? Remember the "streaker" craze? This barley does have blue streaks, but the agronomists who bred it had a chuckle with the name.

    Now it's time to cook.

    Assemble some delicious ingredients. In this case:

    Hulled barley
    Lots of mushrooms. I'd say a pound, but I love 'em.
    A big yellow onion
    Three or four celery stalks
    Two or four carrots
    A head of garlic. Yes a head.
    A little sherry (optional)
    Some hot chiles (I used chiles de Arbol this time around; also optional)
    A few freshly-plucked bay leaves from the bush outside (or some from the grocery)
    Good quality salt
    Miso (I use both mellow white and traditional red miso)

    First measure out a half or 2/3 cups or so of barley. Put them in a pot. Add three times as much water as barley. Turn on the heat. When it boils, set it to low, and set the timer to about 30 or 40 minutes. After a few minutes, fill a tea kettle with water and put it on the stove to boil.

    Meanwhile, slice the celery into delicious sized pieces and set aside. Do the same with the carrot. Slice the mushrooms and set them aside. Cut off the hard end of each garlic clove and peel them all. You can either leave them whole (mine are slightly smushed from smacking them to get the outer husk off) or cut them in half or quarters. Set aside.

    Chop the onion into pieces about 1/8 inch. I love cutting onions. If they make you cry, adjust the salt in your recipe. :smile:

    Get a big saute pan out of the cabinet. Put it on the stove, and get it hot. Add some oil. I use olive oil, but you can use sunflower, grapeseed, or avocoado. Your choice. When it shimmers, add a piece of onions. If it sizzles, add the rest of the onion and cook a few minutes until it starts to soften. You can add some salt if you like, or not. It will soften faster if you put the lid on.

    As the onion softens, add the celery and cook another minute. Then add the mushrooms and cook another minute or three. Then add the carrots and cook another minute. At this point, I broke apart the dried chiles and added them.

    jwrknkcnktw4.jpg

    By now the barley should be about done.

    Add the garlic and cook every so briefly. By now these veggies will smell great.

    Add all the vegetables to the barley. Heat up the saute pan and deglaze with some sherry.

    Add boiling water from the kettle to cover the vegetables. Add as much water as you like. The more you add, the more soup you have. The less you add, the heartier the soup will be.

    Bring back to boil, then turn down to low and add the bay leaves. Let this simmer about 40 minutes, more or less.
    2kko8ijfxi2a.jpg


    Meanwhile, put 1-2 Tbsp each of white and red miso into a bowl. Add a little sherry or other liquid and stir to liquify. Set aside.

    When the soup is done cooking, take it off the heat. Ladle some of the liquid into the bowl with the miso, then add the miso back to the main pot and stir. You want to avoid boiling the miso. It's a living product. This does mean that when you reheat the soup you have to be careful not to cook it too hot, or else you may lose some of the healthy properties of miso.

    Stir.

    Ladle a bowl full. Sit down and enjoy. Wait 15 minutes before you get another bowl, because it's pretty filling, and we're watching our calories, right? This soup probably would work well if you added some ginger. It also goes great with a side of kimchi.

    I don't typically update my recipe, and when I log it, the version I use actually did have potatoes. I'm not too worried. It's about 64 calories per 100 grams, and a bowl is 250 to 350 grams. Very filling, and very tasty.

  • annk18annk18 Member Posts: 72 Member Member Posts: 72 Member
    This sounds and looks delicious. Unfortunately we can't have barley and I can't see a way around it.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member, Premium Posts: 6,744 Member Member, Premium Posts: 6,744 Member
    Hmm, I love barley and haven't had it for awhile (although it is in my pantry), I may have to think about fun and tasty ways to use it.
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member, Premium Posts: 5,359 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,359 Member
    annk18 wrote: »
    This sounds and looks delicious. Unfortunately we can't have barley and I can't see a way around it.

    Can you have rice? That would work, but I would only cook it half way. I bet you could do it with quinoa, but it might be weird. Even hominy. Or just more vegetables. I am not sure, but buckwheat groats (kasha) might work. As an experiment, you might make the soup portion separately and toss in the rice/buckhwheat/whatever (even oat groats) to see if the taste is good before making a whole pot. It also might have a different texture if made as a whole pot rather than added in after the fact.


    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Hmm, I love barley and haven't had it for awhile (although it is in my pantry), I may have to think about fun and tasty ways to use it.

    I actually like it with just a little salt and butter as a change-up from rice. It's got a different nutritional profile. It does go really good with mushroom soup, and it also goes in other soups like nine-bean or whatever.
Sign In or Register to comment.