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BUILD MY OWN WORKOUT

jeromeloresco05jeromeloresco05 Posts: 27Member Member Posts: 27Member Member
so own my non running days I just started doing this workout

row machine: 15mins

Round 1
pull ups: 3 sets of 5 reps
push up: 3/10
dumbbell squat: 40lbs 3/8 (no barbell on the gym)

Round 2
cable row: 3/8
dumbbell press: 25/30/35lbs progression 3/8
deadlift: 30/35/40lbs progression 3/8

What do you think?

Replies

  • sbryanthcsbryanthc Posts: 25Member Member Posts: 25Member Member
    I like doing my own workouts because I am able to tell myself that I chose those workouts, therefore I better finish every last one.

    I’ve tried workout videos and by the end of the week I’m either turning my rest day into a forever rest or not putting effort into it.

    But that’s just me. I know my mind and my body and I know what workouts I need to do to keep seeing progress.

    If it works for you then go for it. If you stop seeing results change it up and if that still doesn’t give you results then try whatever the above people suggested.

    As for me, I like changing it up or I will get bored.
  • CahgetsfitCahgetsfit Posts: 1,344Member Member Posts: 1,344Member Member
    I write my own plans now. But this is after years of following plans coaches provided for me so now I have a decent enough idea of how to build a plan.

    I change it every 6-8 weeks because I get bored.

    I also dislike that "keep your body guessing and confused" thing. That being said though, I often run periodised programs where the rep/set ranges will change each week. Same exercises though.

    At the end of the day, unless you have specific strength or sculpting goals, do whatever makes you happy and keeps your moving.
  • whmscllwhmscll Posts: 1,831Member Member Posts: 1,831Member Member
    I wrote my own program, too, but it combines elements of highly rated established programs, including Strong Lifts 5x5 and New Rules of Lifting For Women. I can’t do some of the exercises exactly as prescribed in those programs, so I’ve substituted others, and tailored the progression to my needs.
  • mcemino2mcemino2 Posts: 152Member, Premium Member Posts: 152Member, Premium Member
    I basically do my own workouts. Tried doing structured programs, but the gym I go to is too busy when I can go to follow a structured program. I try to work the same muscle groups, but may have to substitute a machine for barbell and dumb bell work. Try to progressively load for a few weeks with heavier weight and lower reps, then deload with lighter weight and higher reps.
  • kathryn1391kathryn1391 Posts: 93Member Member Posts: 93Member Member
    The best workout is the one you can stick to - so until your goals really need a focus and a shift, stick with what just makes you feel good. A time will come where it will need to be structured but for now theres really no harm in just going with what you like and can sustain.
  • Sharon_CSharon_C Posts: 1,974Member Member Posts: 1,974Member Member
    I've written my own workouts in the past but this was after years of doing other workouts, hours of watching videos and reading articles and looking to the experts. I do still occasionally do my own workouts when I want to shake things up.

    Also, I agree with the others on the "keep your body guessing" belief. It's not really a thing with your body. Just progressively overload and you're good.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 1,960Member Member Posts: 1,960Member Member
    I always like the people who say I don't agree with "body confusion" but they follow that statement up with "I just change my reps or sets" which in itself is muscle confusion. :smiley:

    Professional athletes only train for 1 specific thing. Running, biking, swimming, body building, whatever their actual profession is. The other 99% of us who aren't and never will be professional athletes should train for real life overall fitness. Keeping your body guessing and trying different movements or workouts will help you find your weaknesses thus giving you overall well rounded fitness and strength.

    Two things. When people say "body confusion" they're typically talking about different exercises all together, not a change in sets, reps, or weight. Second, as Ann said, you're misunderstanding how professional/elite athletes train and underestimating the number of multi-sport athletes that exist. You've got disciplines like triathlon, duathlon, nordic combined, the various multi-discipline track and field events, etc. Then you've also got various athletes who do "crossover sports" ie cyclists who are also speed skaters (sometimes at elite international levels) and people who have swiftly moved from being an elite athlete in one sport to being an elite athlete in another. Most athletes also do some sort of cross training which isn't about "confusing" their bodies.
  • gearhead426hemigearhead426hemi Posts: 723Member Member Posts: 723Member Member
    AnnPT77

    Don't think I was attacking you or even offended the slightest about any of your comments. Life is entirely to short to be offended by what people say. I just suggest people do whatever keeps them active, healthy and happy. Be realistic with goals and expectations and live life.
    edited May 16
  • gearhead426hemigearhead426hemi Posts: 723Member Member Posts: 723Member Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    I am by no means an expert on fitness but I got bored going to the gym everyday and doing structured workouts so I base my workouts by how my body feels that day. I like to just make up a workout right after I take my pre-workout drink. I never workout more than 1 hour and I like to split it up between cardio and strength training. Change it up to keep your body guessing and keep things interesting. If what you are doing makes you feel good and you are getting the results you like stick with it. Some people over think fitness and diet programs. Set realistic goals and keep focused. Best of luck!!

    This is what the famous trainer Mark Rippletoe refers to a F*ckarounditis. It's usually pretty ineffective. And, you body is pretty much never guessing. It's adapting sometimes but it's never guessing. Just sayin'...


    aokoye wrote: »
    I always like the people who say I don't agree with "body confusion" but they follow that statement up with "I just change my reps or sets" which in itself is muscle confusion. :smiley:

    Professional athletes only train for 1 specific thing. Running, biking, swimming, body building, whatever their actual profession is. The other 99% of us who aren't and never will be professional athletes should train for real life overall fitness. Keeping your body guessing and trying different movements or workouts will help you find your weaknesses thus giving you overall well rounded fitness and strength.

    Two things. When people say "body confusion" they're typically talking about different exercises all together, not a change in sets, reps, or weight. Second, as Ann said, you're misunderstanding how professional/elite athletes train and underestimating the number of multi-sport athletes that exist. You've got disciplines like triathlon, duathlon, nordic combined, the various multi-discipline track and field events, etc. Then you've also got various athletes who do "crossover sports" ie cyclists who are also speed skaters (sometimes at elite international levels) and people who have swiftly moved from being an elite athlete in one sport to being an elite athlete in another. Most athletes also do some sort of cross training which isn't about "confusing" their bodies.


    Call it what you want adapting, cross training, guessing whatever, they all refer to different ways making your body adapt to whatever work you are attempting to perform. By attempting work that you normally do not perform your body will let you know your weaknesses. Muscle soreness, exhaustion, cramping are all signs that your body is telling you whatever we did yesterday was not part of the original plan. When you hit plateaus in fitness you either stay happy at that level or you have to adapt to take it to the next level.
    edited May 16
  • DanpDanp Posts: 773Member Member Posts: 773Member Member
    My completely layman, entirely non-scientific and utterly amateurish thoughts on 'body confusion' is that the initial gains in strength from training a particular movement come from improvements in the brain and nervous system.

    Rather than your muscles getting stronger leading to better performance it's more that your brain and nervous system gets 'smarter' or better at using the existing muscles.

    Once this initial neurological performance improvement has happened and progress slows down to the rate of muscle growth people find that 'switching things up' by using different movements lets them tap back into those rapid nervous system improvements.

    So I guess in a sense it's less 'body confusion' and more 'nervous system confusion'.

    Again, I stress this is just my wholly dilettante observation so I could be wildly and spectacularly off base =)
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 7,624Member Member Posts: 7,624Member Member
    Danp wrote: »
    My completely layman, entirely non-scientific and utterly amateurish thoughts on 'body confusion' is that the initial gains in strength from training a particular movement come from improvements in the brain and nervous system.

    Rather than your muscles getting stronger leading to better performance it's more that your brain and nervous system gets 'smarter' or better at using the existing muscles.

    Once this initial neurological performance improvement has happened and progress slows down to the rate of muscle growth people find that 'switching things up' by using different movements lets them tap back into those rapid nervous system improvements.

    So I guess in a sense it's less 'body confusion' and more 'nervous system confusion'.

    Again, I stress this is just my wholly dilettante observation so I could be wildly and spectacularly off base =)

    There is some accuracy to what you say based on neuromuscular adaptation as it relates to strength improvements. I was just recently listening to an Eric Helms podcast where the idea of having to change up your program to force adaptations for muscle growth came up and he basically said it was nonsense. If you keep progressing with a well designed program, you can do it indefinitely. At a certain point, the progress will slow due to reaching your genetic potential and you may need advanced strategies. But for the average amateur, we rarely get there.

    But the whole body confusion thing is nonsense. As is the idea that to follow a well designed program only for people training for specific sports. There are plenty of full body strength and hypertrophy programs that are generalized and not sport specific that are highly effective. PHUL and PHAT come immediately to mind as examples.

    There are plenty of reasons to change up your program, boredom being the primary one. Also, some people, particularly body builders will switch up their focus to achieve a certain aesthetic look as an example. But the "I make it up as I go" approach is not typically (read never) an effective one. But hey, if someone is happy doing it that way, go for it!
  • DanpDanp Posts: 773Member Member Posts: 773Member Member
    Just to clarify I'm not saying that muscle confusion is a real thing.

    More that people have misunderstood the quick progress gained from neuromuscular adaptation (thanks for that term) they experience when they 'change things up' and perform new movements and labelled it 'body confusion'. They tell someone, who tells someone else and before you know it, it's spread and become 'a thing'
    edited May 17
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 7,624Member Member Posts: 7,624Member Member
    Danp wrote: »
    Just to clarify I'm not saying that muscle confusion is a real thing.

    More that people have misunderstood the quick progress gained from neuromuscular adaptation (thanks for that term) they experience when they 'change things up' and perform new movements and labelled it 'body confusion'. They tell someone, who tells someone else and before you know it, it's spread and become 'a thing'

    Yes, understand and agree on all counts.
  • Captain80BlighCaptain80Bligh Posts: 2Member Member Posts: 2Member Member
    so own my non running days I just started doing this workout

    row machine: 15mins

    Round 1
    pull ups: 3 sets of 5 reps
    push up: 3/10
    dumbbell squat: 40lbs 3/8 (no barbell on the gym)

    Round 2
    cable row: 3/8
    dumbbell press: 25/30/35lbs progression 3/8
    deadlift: 30/35/40lbs progression 3/8

    What do you think?

    It looks good. Not sure of the hate. You've got a lower body push and pull including hinge, plus an upper body vertical/horizontal push and pull. Exercise selection looks good as it should not impede your ability to recover and improve at running, which I assume is your main goal.
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