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Protein shakes ... ugh!

version50version50 Posts: 24Member Member Posts: 24Member Member
Anybody else hate these things? I just turned 50, and at 6'0, 195lbs, I keep reading that I should be consuming at least 150g of protein to maintain muscle, testosterone, etc...

I really struggle getting this amount of protein in my daily diet without resorting to shakes/powder (revolting), or protein bars (equally revolting). At best, 100g a day of real food (chicken, pork, beef, fish) is all I can really stomach. And that's forcing myself. I think I'd be happier at 70g.

Seeking other personal observations....are any of you more senior gents (50+) hovering around 100g a day? If so, have you noticed any loss of muscle, or strength, or *ahem* drive?
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Replies

  • MikePTYMikePTY Posts: 2,698Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,698Member, Premium Member
    What is your daily calorie goal? What other foods are you eating besides meats? Sure meats can be a good source of protein, but they are not the only source. Fish, shellfish, cheese, beans, cottage cheese, eggs, are a few I can think of offhand.
  • Lillymoo01Lillymoo01 Posts: 2,355Member Member Posts: 2,355Member Member
    I don't like protein shakes but I do enjoy a scoop of protein powder added to my milk for cereal in the morning.
  • whmscllwhmscll Posts: 2,083Member Member Posts: 2,083Member Member
    Have you tried different brands of protein for your shakes? Not sure if is the taste or something else that you find revolting. It may also depend on the type of powder (whey, casein, pea, soy, etc.)
  • feisty_bucketfeisty_bucket Posts: 988Member Member Posts: 988Member Member
    Protein info dump:
    https://suppversity.blogspot.com/2017/07/protein-08gkg-insufficient-for-female.html
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28698222

    EZ summary:
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/07/well/move/lift-weights-eat-more-protein-especially-if-youre-over-40.html

    *newest standard: "1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day. In practical terms, that would amount to about 130 grams of protein a day for a 175-pound man. (February 2018)"

    version50 wrote: »
    are any of you more senior gents (50+) hovering around 100g a day? If so, have you noticed any loss of muscle, or strength, or *ahem* drive?

    I'm 49 and eat ~130g/protein a day (at around 175lbs, as in the example above). No problems.
    version50 wrote: »
    shakes/powder (revolting), or protein bars (equally revolting).

    They're all different. I love my synthetic f00d, but it took a lot of trial and error to find what I like. Every day I have a shake, a bar, and a concoction ("goop") of whey and gelatin powder. Plus a thing of Chobani Greek yogurt. Usually early in the day before I feel revved up enough to make any real food.


    FWIW, these are my faves:

    bars: Combat Crunch Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough, Cinnamon Twist flavors

    shakes: Premier Protein chocolate (but they're all ok).

    powder goop: Bodytech Whey (Vitamin Shoppe's house brand, cheap) - Rich Chocolate flavor.
    Combine with Great Lakes Gelatin - green can (flavorless) in a bowl. Add 1 tablespoon Nesquik and 2 tablespoons of peanut butter. Slowly mix with a tiny bit of water pouring in from faucet. Fantastic.

    You can also add 1 scoop of vanilla whey (same brand) to certain cereals. Works best with fruit-flavored stuff. Terrible with chocolate. Try Fruity Pebbles, Lucky Charms, berry Captain Crunch. Add Fiber One if you're worried about fiber.

    Good luck!
  • staticsplitstaticsplit Posts: 477Member Member Posts: 477Member Member
    I don't like protein shakes on their own but I like them mixed in with other stuff. I'll often add 5g of whey to my café au lait I make with my coffee machine - the milk and powder makes it like 7 or 8g of protein. Or chocolate (I use protein works) blended with frozen cherries or banana, oat milk, and a tablespoon of peanut butter. Tastes like dessert.

    I have a giant thing of unflavored pea protein and I've made pancakes with them or as part of a coating for baked cauliflower 'wings.' I've made protein energy balls with protein powder, dates, nut butter, mixed seeds, chocolate chips, etc.

    A can of tuna is great for a non protein powder source. Second adding lentils to things like pasta sauce etc. I usually have a bit bowl of broccoli to bulk up a meal that usually has 4 or 5g, and yes little bits add up. Cottage cheese or ricotta or cream cheese on crackers. Babybel cheese or string cheese.

    I tend to eat about 90 to 125g and I weigh 155. That seems to be fine for me. I'd struggle to get 150.
  • jeffjeff85jeffjeff85 Posts: 51Member Member Posts: 51Member Member
    I routinely get 150g protein just eating food. Ocassionally break 200 grams. And this is on or under 1800 calories.
    Chicken breast, chicken eggs, tuna, salmon, Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, beef, pork loin,... all pretty high protein
  • EvamuttEvamutt Posts: 1,556Member Member Posts: 1,556Member Member
    I'm not male but I average around 125 or so protein per day. My brunch I just had of beans, cheese & a turkey sausage came to 47g protein. I eat some type of meat/poultry at every meal & have 1-2 servings of greek yogurt a day
  • erickirberickirb Posts: 12,255Member Member Posts: 12,255Member Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    version50 wrote: »
    Wow, lots of good advice and observations here. Lots of interesting links, as well. What a helpful community!

    But in the end, I think I just need to start experimenting on my body.

    No more protein powders/bars.
    No more forcing myself to eat 1g protein/lean muscle mass, just because that's conventional wisdom.

    I'm just going to eat plain ol' food (beef, chicken, turkey, pork) until I'm full. That's usually around 80g of protein a day on a 2100 calorie daily diet.

    I'm going to do this for the next few weeks, and see if there is any noticeable loss of strength, energy, weight, or composition.

    Some of these won't show up as fast as a few weeks - with decent lab tests let alone subjective assessment. That's part of the problem with managing them.

    I'm not disputing your strategy, just cautioning that the effects can be subtle, long-term, and cumulative.

    ^ This

    On 2100 cals you should be able to get at least 120 grams without trying. just have larger portions of the meat and less of the starches in your meals.
  • LarodeLarode Posts: 22Member Member Posts: 22Member Member
    I like premier protein vanilla shakes.
  • rhtexasgalrhtexasgal Posts: 529Member Member Posts: 529Member Member
    I mix my chocolate or vanilla protein powder with unsweetened cold coffee. I just brew extra every morning and put the excess in the fridge for the following day. The acidity of the coffee cuts down on the "cloying" flavor of many protein powders ... AND you get a hit of caffeine as additional fuel for a workout. I drink this concoction before my gym workout and it truly makes a difference for me. I retain body inflammation due to autoimmune issues and the caffeine helps my muscles warm up a little quicker.
  • DanSanthomesDanSanthomes Posts: 126Member Member Posts: 126Member Member
    Are you maintaining weight on 2100 cals when you are 6'0 and 195lbs?
    That would be barely more than an average sized female. If you are maintaining and that is a current picture of you in your profile I would suspect very inaccurate food logging TBH.

    I'm 49, 5'10, 173lbs and maintain on 1950 cals per day. (I weigh and log everything and have 2.5 years of data)

    Currently losing a bit of 'fluff' so lifting regularly and keeping my protein intake high (it often hits 200g a day). Not seeing any appreciable loss of strength (other than bench press plateaud) or muscle size but then am only in a 250 cal deficit. (However, I actually really like MyProtein's Vanilla Whey shake so I can have two a day and the taste doesn't bother me. I make up the rest with meat, fish, eggs, nuts, dairy etc.) Testosterone/drive has never been higher.

    I think it all comes down to the individual. If you're happy on a lower amount of protein and not seeing/feeling any negatives then carry on, I say. Personal experience has taught me to keep protein high and lower the dietary fat where possible. Incorporate proper progressive resistance training into your lifestyle and watch the booze and *kitten*.

    Best of luck.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 7,838Member Member Posts: 7,838Member Member
    version50 wrote: »
    Anybody else hate these things? I just turned 50, and at 6'0, 195lbs, I keep reading that I should be consuming at least 150g of protein to maintain muscle, testosterone, etc...

    I really struggle getting this amount of protein in my daily diet without resorting to shakes/powder (revolting), or protein bars (equally revolting). At best, 100g a day of real food (chicken, pork, beef, fish) is all I can really stomach. And that's forcing myself. I think I'd be happier at 70g.

    Seeking other personal observations....are any of you more senior gents (50+) hovering around 100g a day? If so, have you noticed any loss of muscle, or strength, or *ahem* drive?

    As we age we lose mass quicker and quicker. Literature suggest age fifty is considered the starting point on average of the slope and for every ten years we lose another 10% of mass. Not very appetizing to say the least and obviously not healthy at all.

    I'll be turning 50 very soon and currently eat the low end of protein(190-210g) for my age and goals at 240lb.

    I don't notice muscle loss as of yet quite the opposite since I'm a athlete who has trained consistently for forty plus years.

    I continue to get stronger and would be considered in the strongest percentile of men my age.

    Also, no my sex drive is probably considered higher than most teenagers. If you are concerned about yours, a doctors visit would be a great idea.

    I would state once you start noticing mass loss, it will be that much harder to stop it and catch up. Though it certainly possible.

    I suggest a intelligently written resistance program with auto regulation built in. Protien intake should be closer to 1g per lb bw if not more if we are talking optimal results. 150g would be more towards "not being deficient" which is more bare minimum depending on your LBM.

    Whey may be useful to help you obtain your protein goal. Fish or skinless chicken breast is another good option to acquire protein without a racing amount of calories.




  • staticsplitstaticsplit Posts: 477Member Member Posts: 477Member Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    version50 wrote: »
    Wow, lots of good advice and observations here. Lots of interesting links, as well. What a helpful community!

    But in the end, I think I just need to start experimenting on my body.

    No more protein powders/bars.
    No more forcing myself to eat 1g protein/lean muscle mass, just because that's conventional wisdom.

    I'm just going to eat plain ol' food (beef, chicken, turkey, pork) until I'm full. That's usually around 80g of protein a day on a 2100 calorie daily diet.

    I'm going to do this for the next few weeks, and see if there is any noticeable loss of strength, energy, weight, or composition.

    Are you maintaining weight on 2100 cals when you are 6'0 and 195lbs?
    That would be barely more than an average sized female. If you are maintaining and that is a current picture of you in your profile I would suspect very inaccurate food logging TBH.

    As a data point, I'm 6'0" and female and reasonably active and I maintain on 2100-2200 (though tbh I'm not super accurate with logging, so could be higher).

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