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Cancer Research UK Controversial Ads - Thoughts?

tinkerbellang83tinkerbellang83 Posts: 6,664Member Member Posts: 6,664Member Member
Some of you may have seen there's been a big hubbub the last week or so about CRUK's latest ad campaign targeting obesity.

https://news.sky.com/story/cancer-research-advert-criticised-for-comparing-smoking-to-obesity-11754904

Those of you who haven't seen/heard, they are using a mock-up of a cigarette packet to indicate that obesity is becoming more of a problem than smoking in relation to cancer, using ads like below.
2qnymlc1uyse.png

The actual main focus of their campaign is to have food ads that target children withdrawn from TV/Social Media, in the hope that the reduction in advertising may help reduce obesity in children, in the same way tackling cigarette advertising has helped reduce the numbers of people smoking.
https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-us/we-develop-policy/our-policy-on-preventing-cancer/our-policy-on-obesity-and-diet-1

They have received quite a backlash from people claiming that it's fat-shaming.

Personally, I don't think it is fat-shaming - it's not calling out people for being fat, their campaign is targeting manufacturers and governments to intervene and help people improve their health. I do think they could have highlighted their aim better (the link to the website is tiny).

I also think that by the controversial nature of the ad, it has gotten people talking about it and is helping raise awareness of the lack of support for people struggling with their weight, particularly when we look at underlying causes of obesity, for a lot of people it's not as straightforward as eat less, move more because there are underlying issues that need to be dealt with - disordered relationship with food, anxiety, depression, etc; lack of education on the science of weight management and the BS that the diet industry spreads to keep people perpetually overweight, so they can keep lining their pockets.

At the same time, I have seen some awful responses online (Instagram, Twitter, Facebook) from people on both sides of the fence, so I can certainly understand why some people are so upset by the campaign.

What are your thoughts? Please keep it respectful!




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Replies

  • LINIALINIA Posts: 1,006Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,006Member, Premium Member
    No, had not been aware of the ads...thanks for bringing them to our attention. My entire family is overweight with some members actually obese.
    Nothing will help and that is true for a majority of ppl, we can not shame, embarrass or fight the advertising industry. Sorry this sounds so pessimistic but we have almost all (percentage wise) lost our way.
  • 6raham6raham Posts: 146Member Member Posts: 146Member Member
    6raham wrote: »
    Personally I think the day we can purchase vegetables cheaper than we can buy fast food, educate kids effectively in school on nutrition and food preparation make sport / physical education a daily event in school is the day we have a positive impact on obesity numbers. Not just a picture on a bus stop...

    It's a fair point you make, but do you think the uproar the picture on a bus stop has caused might highlight more the needs for these things to the people who are responsible for ensuring this education is happening and result in more people being aware of the campaign to tackle obesity, particularly in children?

    Cancer Research's policy on obesity does state they are on several steering groups/forum in England, Scotland & Wales that are working with the government to tackle obesity and have encouraged people to also contact their MP to support the ban on daytime fast food/junk food ads.

    I do also think that the cost of fresh fruit and vegetables is not really as much of an issue as people think. Take Aldi for instance, they have their Super 6 running all year round, this week there are courgettes, aubergines, sugar snap peas, peaches, melon and romaine lettuce. Tesco had the wonky veg range. Then you can get bags of frozen veg relatively cheap too and these will often create far more meals than the cost of one item of fast food.

    In my opinion, in the UK, the reason people buy more fast food than fresh is that it's more convenient rather than it being cheaper. Much easier to bang some stuff in the oven and microwave, than cook something from scratch. Not that this is the case for all, but I am sure it's the case for the majority, particularly now we're at the point where in most families both parents are out at work all day and have to choose between spending time with their kids or in the kitchen prepping and making dinner.



    I agree, it highlights the issue and if it causes one person to really consider their health and diet then its served a purpose but i think the whole process from education is key.

    I completely agree if you go looking you will find cheaper veg and that is exactly what my family and I do, Lidl and Aldi are great for cheaper veg but that is for us as adults who are doing a weekly shop and are prepared to cook and plan etc. I mean more for kids or young adults, for example next time you walk into a Tesco Express or similar look to see what offers are on and what items are positioned at the end of aisles with deals such as £1 for this or 4 for 3 on these, they might have offers on snackable veg and fruit but those items are positioned far behind the whisper snack packs and dairy milk 500g bars which you can by when on offer cheaper than a pot of melon and grapes and that is where the education or routine starts for our kids.
  • tinkerbellang83tinkerbellang83 Posts: 6,664Member Member Posts: 6,664Member Member
    6raham wrote: »
    6raham wrote: »
    Personally I think the day we can purchase vegetables cheaper than we can buy fast food, educate kids effectively in school on nutrition and food preparation make sport / physical education a daily event in school is the day we have a positive impact on obesity numbers. Not just a picture on a bus stop...

    It's a fair point you make, but do you think the uproar the picture on a bus stop has caused might highlight more the needs for these things to the people who are responsible for ensuring this education is happening and result in more people being aware of the campaign to tackle obesity, particularly in children?

    Cancer Research's policy on obesity does state they are on several steering groups/forum in England, Scotland & Wales that are working with the government to tackle obesity and have encouraged people to also contact their MP to support the ban on daytime fast food/junk food ads.

    I do also think that the cost of fresh fruit and vegetables is not really as much of an issue as people think. Take Aldi for instance, they have their Super 6 running all year round, this week there are courgettes, aubergines, sugar snap peas, peaches, melon and romaine lettuce. Tesco had the wonky veg range. Then you can get bags of frozen veg relatively cheap too and these will often create far more meals than the cost of one item of fast food.

    In my opinion, in the UK, the reason people buy more fast food than fresh is that it's more convenient rather than it being cheaper. Much easier to bang some stuff in the oven and microwave, than cook something from scratch. Not that this is the case for all, but I am sure it's the case for the majority, particularly now we're at the point where in most families both parents are out at work all day and have to choose between spending time with their kids or in the kitchen prepping and making dinner.



    I agree, it highlights the issue and if it causes one person to really consider their health and diet then its served a purpose but i think the whole process from education is key.

    I completely agree if you go looking you will find cheaper veg and that is exactly what my family and I do, Lidl and Aldi are great for cheaper veg but that is for us as adults who are doing a weekly shop and are prepared to cook and plan etc. I mean more for kids or young adults, for example next time you walk into a Tesco Express or similar look to see what offers are on and what items are positioned at the end of aisles with deals such as £1 for this or 4 for 3 on these, they might have offers on snackable veg and fruit but those items are positioned far behind the whisper snack packs and dairy milk 500g bars which you can by when on offer cheaper than a pot of melon and grapes and that is where the education or routine starts for our kids.

    Totally agree, that is precisely what CRUK are campaigning against, the ads are just one part of a much larger campaign:

    nefoho7l74nu.png
    excerpt from CRUK Website which the link on the ad is for.
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