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Emotional Support Dog at the Gym

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  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 367Member Member Posts: 367Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    LyndaBSS wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    I actually don't believe in service dogs from an ethical standpoint. I just don't think any sentient being should be conscripted to a lifetime of 24/7 servitude.

    What about cadaver dogs, search and rescue dogs and those that visit cancer ridden children in the hospital while they're going through terrifying chemo treatments?

    Drug dogs, bomb sniffing dogs too. And therapy dogs, I know a children's psychologist who uses one.

    As an aside, our airport (O'Hare) security lines are way better whenever they are using the dogs (which they seem to be doing more lately). When they first got them and people were less used to them, I was surprised at how many tried to pet them even though they have vests that say clearly "working dog, don't pet" or something like that, and were being handled by an official person.

    One of my co-workers almost missed a flight at O'Hare when Barney the drug sniffing beagle threw up on the job. They had to take time to clean things up and get another dog to cover the remainder of Barney's shift.

    I do agree the lines generally are better when the dogs are on duty.
  • mike_rommike_rom Posts: 541Member Member Posts: 541Member Member
    hotel4dogs wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    I actually don't believe in service dogs from an ethical standpoint. I just don't think any sentient being should be conscripted to a lifetime of 24/7 servitude.

    What I coincidence @33gail33. I was just chatting on another forum about the incredible strides my niece has taken since her mom and dad were able to acquire a service dog for her. She is autistic, and since having the dog she has made incredible progress in being able to interact with family and friends as well as simple daily functions.

    Oh, she has also just recently started eating again, the animal is helping her overcome the food rejection common with some autistic folks.

    The dog? She's a yellow lab mix. 100% part of the family, loved and treated like gold by everyone, and anyone who knows anything at all about dogs could clearly see the joy she has in going through her routine, hanging tight by my niece and just loving that girl.

    It's very much a partnership. So, your post ...well...there is nothing even worth carrying on a conversation about, but it did warrant a reply.

    The show Cat From Hell now has a Cat from Heaven segment and one featured a cat who had similarly positive effects on an autistic child. There was also one about a cat who goes to a local library and helps kids who have trouble reading feel more comfortable.

    I mean, if we are still on the dogs as employees analogy, I'm going to concede that they are generally going to be better employee types than cats, but I had to plug a couple of cats too!

    ;-)

    There's everything right with a good cat :) I admit it's difficult to imagine a cat as a service animal/companion, but suffice to say I believe a fair number of humans sorely underestimate the benefit and value our 4 legged friends can add to a life. :)

    We adopted a cat from our neighbours a few years ago before they moved. We already had two other cats at the time.

    My daughter struggles with clinical depression and anxiety, as well as some physical issues. From day one, Simon latched onto her as his 'person.' He just knows when she's not having a good day and won't leave her side at those times. There have been lots of times when I know she's having a particularly rough time simply by watching him.

    He has the gift of always being able to calm her when she's anxious, and make her smile when her depression flares. He's her silent, non-judgemental therapy companion, and worth a million bucks to us all. <3

    A good companion tends to be amazing that way. :) It blows my mind sometimes that some folks can't see a family dog or cat as family. They are, very much so.

    I know this won't be a popular opinion....I'm sorry in advance for those I'll offend.

    I have absolutely no problem with you feeling that way about your dog. I do have a problem if you expect everyone else to feel the same way about your pet. Believe it or not, there are people that do not like dogs, are afraid of dogs, or just do not want to be around them.

    I don't believe they should have all the "rights" of a human member of your family, and that means respecting the rules of public places. To be clear, I'm not saying that you personally do this, but there seems to be a huge uptick in people bringing their dogs to stores, restaurants, etc. and expecting that this is no problem for everyone. I also see more and more people ignoring leash laws in public parks. It's really an issue of respect for your fellow humans.

    Actually I suspect (hope) that it is a popular opinion.
    I feel that way about kids, too...

    Ha...I have a much higher tolerance for kids. I know at some point they will learn to stop drooling on themselves and pooping on the floor. :p

    I'm the opposite. Much rather get down on the floor and play with a dog than a kid :)

    Exactly..... hang out with a teenager for a bit and you'll MUCH prefer life with a dog.

    I wouldn't be able to get in my workout... i'd just want to play with that dog the WHOLE time!!!
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 2,875Member Member Posts: 2,875Member Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    LyndaBSS wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    I actually don't believe in service dogs from an ethical standpoint. I just don't think any sentient being should be conscripted to a lifetime of 24/7 servitude.

    What about cadaver dogs, search and rescue dogs and those that visit cancer ridden children in the hospital while they're going through terrifying chemo treatments?

    Drug dogs, bomb sniffing dogs too. And therapy dogs, I know a children's psychologist who uses one.

    As an aside, our airport (O'Hare) security lines are way better whenever they are using the dogs (which they seem to be doing more lately). When they first got them and people were less used to them, I was surprised at how many tried to pet them even though they have vests that say clearly "working dog, don't pet" or something like that, and were being handled by an official person.

    One of my co-workers almost missed a flight at O'Hare when Barney the drug sniffing beagle threw up on the job. They had to take time to clean things up and get another dog to cover the remainder of Barney's shift.

    I do agree the lines generally are better when the dogs are on duty.

    Terrible for your co-worker, but now he has a great story, at least.
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